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Re: [Czechlist] nastupovat

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  • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
    ... Well, you could say boarded the subway . ;-) I usually translate nastupovat in cases like that as something simple and boring, like arise or
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 2, 2002
      In a message dated 3/2/02 5:50:00 PM, erik@... writes:

      >Po valce nastupuje experimentator novych animacních postupu Karel
      >Zeman...

      >The only equivalents that have come to my mind so far are "enter the
      >scene" and "enter the fray", but both sound silly in the context (and
      >I can't use the former much in this extremely long translation,
      >because it's all about puppets), so nixon that.

      Well, you could say "boarded the subway". ;-)

      I usually translate "nastupovat" in cases like that as something simple and
      boring, like "arise" or "appeared" or "came on the scene".

      "After the war, Karel Zeman came on the scene and experimented with new
      methods of animation."

      Sounds perfectly natural to me, and not silly.

      Jamie
    • Martin Janda
      Emerge? If it works for markets... :-) Martin ... From: erisdiscordia.rm To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, March 02, 2002 11:48 PM Subject:
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 3, 2002
        Emerge? If it works for markets... :-)
        Martin
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: erisdiscordia.rm
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, March 02, 2002 11:48 PM
        Subject: [Czechlist] nastupovat


        Hi Czechers,

        I'm looking for some nice equivalent for "nastupovat" in the sense
        used below:

        Po valce nastupuje experimentator novych animacních postupu Karel
        Zeman...

        The only equivalents that have come to my mind so far are "enter the
        scene" and "enter the fray", but both sound silly in the context (and
        I can't use the former much in this extremely long translation,
        because it's all about puppets), so nixon that.

        Two fingers up,
        Erich P.


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      • melvyn.geo
        ... Hmmm, might _possibly_ work in a phrase like: 1946 saw the emergence of... but normally I d go for arrived/appeared on the scene or in some
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 3, 2002
          --- In Czechlist@y..., "Martin Janda" <martinjanda@v...> wrote:
          > Emerge? If it works for markets... :-)
          > Martin

          Hmmm, might _possibly_ work in a phrase like:
          "1946 saw the emergence of..." but normally I'd go for
          "arrived/appeared on the scene" or in some circumstances: "came/rose
          to prominence". Don't know if that works here though.



          >
          > Po valce nastupuje experimentator novych animacních postupu Karel
          > Zeman...
          >
          At the risk of sounding like a total busybody, I'd just mention that
          I often translate lists of events in the 'present historic' with the
          simple past tense.

          M.
        • erisdiscordia.rm
          ... Actually, there are times when the present historic *feels* right to me as I roll along translating, though I can t cite a single damn grammar rule
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 3, 2002
            > > Po valce nastupuje experimentator novych animacních postupu
            > > Karel Zeman...
            > >
            > At the risk of sounding like a total busybody, I'd just mention
            > that I often translate lists of events in the 'present historic'
            > with the simple past tense.

            Actually, there are times when the 'present historic' *feels* right
            to me as I roll along translating, though I can't cite a single damn
            grammar rule justifying it. Often I squash a bunch of these (or, more
            rarely, change some pasts into present historics) during self-
            proofreading, to maintain consistency of tense.

            Of course, this and many other aspects of my English leaves me
            nervously wondering how much it's been corrupted by Czech.

            Erik "Schprockets!" Piper
          • erisdiscordia.rm
            ... simple and ... new ... Try using it more than once in a few pages, out of hundreds of pages all full of puppets and stages, and you might find yourself
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 3, 2002
              --- In Czechlist@y..., JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:

              > I usually translate "nastupovat" in cases like that as something
              simple and
              > boring, like "arise" or "appeared" or "came on the scene".
              >
              > "After the war, Karel Zeman came on the scene and experimented with
              new
              > methods of animation."
              >
              > Sounds perfectly natural to me, and not silly.
              >
              Try using it more than once in a few pages, out of hundreds of pages
              all full of puppets and stages, and you might find yourself like me,
              sitting there feeling it sounds like it's trying to make a bad joke
              (even though it's not).

              I do like the other suggestions, though. Simple and boring (i.e.
              unobtrusive) is exactly what I'm looking for.

              Erik
            • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
              ... HA! Now I get it. In that case, better not say came on the scene . How about saying he popped up ? ;-) Jamie
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 3, 2002
                In a message dated 3/3/02 5:48:06 PM, erik@... writes:

                >> Sounds perfectly natural to me, and not silly.
                >>
                >Try using it more than once in a few pages, out of hundreds of pages
                >all full of puppets and stages, and you might find yourself like me,
                >sitting there feeling it sounds like it's trying to make a bad joke
                >(even though it's not).

                HA! Now I get it. In that case, better not say "came on the scene". How
                about saying he "popped up"? ;-)

                Jamie
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