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51084Re: ISSUES: Issues

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  • jenuwefa
    Mar 6, 2013
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      This is going to be one of those rare times when I actually agree with Jamie... :) Weren't we talking about this at lunch the other day, Liz?

      Just the other day, my agency sent me a really beautiful promo booklet for a photography studio for a last preprint check, telling me not to make any major changes, to just check the hyphenation, etc. as it had been proofread by a native speaker. I was so appalled by the mistakes and generally crappy English I found...I told them as such and did the corrections for a symbolic 100 CZK because I couldn't bear to see it go out like that...

      I know that some of my translations are weak - the problem is that I do a lot of quick turnaround jobs and don't get the time to let the translation "rest" for a while before going back to look at it again before sending it back. Sometimes I have to go back and pull up an old document for reference and am appalled by my own translation. :( If I do a job that's big and important, I usually get another native speaker to look at it before I send it back, just to cover my ass.

      Jennifer

      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
      >
      > Talking to a friend just now has just made me realize you guys are probably misunderstanding my assertions about people's language deteriorating.
      >
      > I'm not talking about people "not keeping up" with changes in their native language. That has actually changed due to technology, although Internet media and TV don't contain all language people use, so while someone may know all the recent slang, they may forget what an aglet is or the exact wording of some everyday proverb that only comes out in speech.
      >
      > What I'm actually talking about is how constant use of the language of the foreign country and immersion in the culture (with a small C) actually causes people problems processing their native language properly. A Swede once described it as the native language being cached on the hard drive and the new language being loaded into RAM.
      >
      > When the person gets back home, it takes time for the new native language to get loaded back into RAM, or whatever the brain has that's like it. The more immersed the person was, the worse the problem can be.
      >
      > This is why not only my English got weak in CZ, but my German also went to hell despite nearly daily exposure to German. Czech was loaded up front, so it was mostly Czech nuggets arranged for delivery.
      >
      > It's all about one's brain reducing effort. An old girlfriend of mine used to talk to her sister on the phone this way: "Ay, habibi! Ay azizi! Yeah, I know, because [Arabic, Arabic, Arabic, Chaldean, Arabic, Chaldean], but don't worry, because he'll just [Arabic, Arabic, Arabic, Chaldean...], you know?" She was perfectly capable of saying everything in Arabic or Chaldean that she said in English, but it was just too hard for her brain to pull the Arabic phrase off the hard drive when the English equivalent was right up there in RAM.
      >
      > The bad TM I get from native English speakers is not due to the fact that they have not kept up with vocabulary changes, but because their brain has become partially Czechified in their processing of English.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:53 PM, Melvyn wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
      > >
      > >>
      > >> It's no secret that a long sojourn in a foreign country affects one's judgements about what is and isn't natural in one's native language.
      > >
      > > In these days of inexpensive air travel, intercity buses you can hop on at a moment's notice and round-the-clock instant communications this view does strike me as charmingly anachronistic.
      > >
      > > Still, I daresay there are some linguistic pitfalls if you stay put practically anywhere for any length of time, e.g. in north Manchester, where I have to constantly bite my teacherly tongue in case relatives become too afraid to open their mouths in front of me. :-O Does the substandard English that you hear around you ever have a negative effect on your language, Jamie?
      > >
      > > And BTW I can never be sure as sure can be about what is natural in my native language, because there are so many varieties of it. Just thirty miles down the road in Liverpool they use words in their everyday speech that I have never heard of.
      > >
      > > BR
      > >
      > > Melvyn
      > >
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      >
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