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48926Re: [Czechlist] Re: Predsedkyne predstavenstva

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  • Charlie Stanford Translations
    May 2, 2012
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      Maybe things will change Liz but "Madame Chairman" is nearly 4 times more common than "Madame Chairwoman" according to Google hits (fairly unscientific method but still...). I think the Canadian Deputy Speaker is out on a bit of a limb.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Liz
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, May 02, 2012 11:15 AM
      Subject: [Czechlist] Re: Predsedkyne predstavenstva



      Penguin:

      - chairman or chairwoman noun (pl chairmen or chairwomen) 1 somebody who presides over or heads a meeting, committee, organization....

      - chairperson noun (pl chairpersons) a chairman or chairwoman

      - womankind noun female human beings; women as a whole, esp as distinguished from men.

      My super-ancient Merriam-Webster offers only chairman, but I see online they have

      - chairwoman: a woman who serves as chairman

      As to "Madam Chairman", here's a little entertainment from Canada:
      http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/34872-deputy-speaker-draws-line-%E2%80%98madam-chairman%E2%80%99

      - Liz

      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Tomas Mosler" <tomas.mosler@...> wrote:
      >
      > Just out of curiosity - cannot be "-man" understood as a universal/neutral form derived from the meaning of person/human, rather than male? Just like we don't say mankind and womankind? :) Or what makes the difference that "mankind" is still gender neutral?
      >
      > Tomas
      >
      >
      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Liz" <spacils@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi Matej,
      > >
      > > IMO, consistency what's most important: either Chairman for males and Chairwoman for females, OR Chairperson for all genders.
      > >
      > > Chairman for males and Chairperson for females makes my upper lip curl.
      > >
      > > Another gender-neutral form, "Chair", is used widely (and consistently) in academia.
      > >
      > > Someone once tried to explain to me that the -man in Chairman is from the Latin "manus" (hand), making "Chairman" gender-neutral, but that seems to be one of those popular urban myths...
      > >
      > > Cheers
      > >
      > > Liz
      >





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