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46885Re: Re[3]: [Czechlist] Creative translation contest: Lichoz^routi, Lichac^e

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  • James Kirchner
    Aug 3 5:33 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      "Odd sock eaters" sounds like "technical mechanic" or "clothes-sewing tailor" or "food-preparing chef". The word "odd" is completely redundant.

      Besides, which sock is the odd one? In the US, instead of "odd", you'd have to use a word like "random" -- again, completely redundant -- because "odd" is more likely to strike kids as meaning slightly bizarre.

      Jamie

      On Aug 3, 2011, at 8:21 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

      > That's exactly my thinking...
      >
      > I don't mind 'odd-sock eaters' and you're right, the odd-bit is
      > important/adds character to it.. it may be inherently present in
      > sock-eaters as Jamie explains (I've never lost two socks from the same
      > pair), but I'd like to have it in the name...
      >
      > I guess I needed to check how different things sound to native ears and
      > what associations do they bring up... but as always that's very
      > individual...
      >
      > Keep it up though, I'm sure we'll come up with something...
      >
      > M
      > ------ Original Message ------
      > From: "Charlie Stanford Translations"
      > <charliestanfordtranslations@...>
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: 3.8.2011 14:15:59
      > Subject: Re: Re: [Czechlist] Creative translation contest:
      > Lichoz^routi, Lichac^e
      > >I didn't realise it was a Yiddish word (I suppose it sounds it) but I think
      > >that Kent is right that it is pretty much used across the English-speaking
      > >world. I quite like "sock-noshers". Maybe "sock munchers". I might be in a
      > >bit of a minority but I think there is poetry in the term "odd sock" and
      > >don't know why you don't like it Matej - I realise that it is a bit
      > >long-winded to have to keep saying "odd-sock eaters" but "odd sock" sounds
      > >great in English with all those harsh sounds and short vowels and "odd-sock
      > >eaters" is quick to say and sounds funny which is important. Half the fun
      > >of the whole idea of course is that they only chomp one of your socks and
      > >looking at "Sockeaters" I am not sure if that would be immediately
      > >apparent - perhaps it would in the US.
      > >
      > >
      > >----- Original Message -----
      > >From: "Kent Christopher Kasha" <kasha@...>
      > >To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      > >Sent: Wednesday, August 03, 2011 1:28 PM
      > >Subject: Re: Re: [Czechlist] Creative translation contest: Lichoz^routi,
      > >Lichac^e
      > >
      > >
      > >Yeah, it came into the English language through Yiddish, though its roots
      > >are in German, as a lot of Yiddish words are, I guess. I always say that if
      > >a prairie boy from the plains of Saskatchewan knows what it is, then most
      > >people in the English-speaking world probably do! :) But I guess it could be
      > >a bit more obscure. I thought it seemed to flow a bit, but using the word
      > >nosh too often in the book could get a bit tiresome. So I think the best
      > >ideas are sockeater or sock-troll, in my humble opinion.
      > >
      > >Stephan von Pohl <stephan.pohl@...> napsal(a):
      > >
      > >>
      > >>Jamie,
      > >>
      > >>Yes, this type of creature exists, just like the little trolls who hide
      > >>your car keys all the time. But I've never come across them actually
      > >>having a name. We never called them "sockeaters" (in the US). At least
      > >>not in the sense that they had a name: we would just make jokes about
      > >>the creatures that ate our socks.
      > >>
      > >>Kent: Sock-noshers is nice. But maybe a little too specific (most but
      > >>not all people know what "to nosh" means, but it still smacks a little
      > >>too much of New York Jewish)
      > >>
      > >>Steve
      > >>
      > >>On 8/3/2011 1:28 PM, James Kirchner wrote:
      > >>> Matej, this type of "being" already exists in American "folklore" and in
      > >>> the English language (at least in the US).
      > >>>
      > >>> Every American knows that there is a creature in every dryer called "the
      > >>> Sock Eater" that eats one sock in a pair and leaves the other one.
      > >>>
      > >>> So if you call these books/films simply "The Sock Eaters", every
      > >>> American will know immediately that it's about creatures who get into
      > >>> the laundry and eat just one sock from a pair.
      > >>>
      > >>> Jamie
      > >>>
      > >>> On Aug 3, 2011, at 7:01 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:
      > >>>
      > >>> > Hi there,
      > >>> >
      > >>> > a client asked me to review/improve the English translation of a
      > >>> title
      > >>> > of a book/upcoming film...
      > >>> >
      > >>> > It started life as a series of children books about weird 'beings'
      > >>> who
      > >>> > are responsible for the disappearance of single socks out of pairs of
      > >>> > socks..... now they are making it into a 3D animation, do a google
      > >>> text
      > >>> > and image search for Lichozrouti and you'll get the idea... the story
      > >>> > (and the aesthetics) are a bit of a KUKY rip-off by the looks of it..
      > >>> >
      > >>> > Here's bits of text that explains the thing (hope diacritics come
      > >>> > through OK):
      > >>> >
      > >>> > ...vždyť každému na světě se alespoň jednou ztratila ponožka!
      > >>> > ...no řekni, není to téma na román?
      > >>> >
      > >>> > Takhle jsem se před časem zeptala spisovatele Pavla Šruta,
      > >>> > když jsme za sebou měli už řadu společných, kritikou i čtenáři
      > >>> > uvítaných knih pro děti. A tak vznikli Lichožrouti, knižní
      > >>> bestseller, který posbíral řadu cen a zvedl vlnu
      > >>> > ohlasů na internetu i v knihovnách a na školách, jak jsme se osobně
      > >>> > mohli přesvědčit. Kdekdo měl ty své lichožrouty doma a vyprávěl nám
      > >>> > tu svou historku o ztracených ponožkách. Ten zájem si vynutil
      > >>> > i pokračování - Lichožrouti se vracejí. A také audioverzi Lichožroutů
      > >>> v podání Báry
      > >>> > Hrzánové.
      > >>> > Kniha se pro internacionální srozumitelnost tématu začala překládat
      > >>> do
      > >>> > cizích jazyků.
      > >>> > Všichni, včetně mne, chtěli o těch, kteří dělají z párů licháče,
      > >>> vědět
      > >>> > víc. A chtěli je vidět.
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>> > The books are by Pavel Srut and are apparently quite popular, they
      > >>> have
      > >>> > been translated (possibly by Srut himself, he's also a translator)...
      > >>> > AFAIK they've been using two translations of the title:
      > >>> >
      > >>> > - the odd-sock eaters (IMHO that's a bit long, literal and
      > >>> 'unpoetic'),
      > >>> > but it says what they do... there's no poetry or mystique like in the
      > >>> > Czech title..
      > >>> >
      > >>> > - the odd-eaters - I like this one better, but the meaning IMHO leans
      > >>> > toward 'divnozrouti' (odd being both lichy and divny), which I think
      > >>> > would be OK, except I checked it online and here's what come up,
      > >>> among
      > >>> > other things:
      > >>> >
      > >>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vy-ncbUPg-s
      > >>> >
      > >>> > Now is that the meaning that first comes into native minds, or is the
      > >>> > word 'odd-eaters' sort of open-ended?
      > >>> >
      > >>> > I must say I didn't get the full meaning of 'Lichozrouti' until I
      > >>> read
      > >>> > the text above... on its own, it sounds mysterious and poetic, but
      > >>> > doesn't give you the full idea of pairs of socks being parted...
      > >>> >
      > >>> > To me, the first translation above is sort of boring, descriptive,
      > >>> too
      > >>> > long and too literal - not suited for a film title (plus the
      > >>> characters
      > >>> > will be called that in the film... I think something a little
      > >>> snappier
      > >>> > is needed)...
      > >>> >
      > >>> > The second one is much better, it leaves things to imagination a
      > >>> little
      > >>> > - just as the Czech title does... but I'm worried about other
      > >>> > meanings/associations (why doesn't English have a word for an odd
      > >>> > number that doesn't also mean 'weird'?)...
      > >>> >
      > >>> > Thanks for comments..
      > >>> >
      > >>> > Of course if you get any ideas about other routes that could be taken
      > >>> > re: Lichoz^routi and Lichac^e (ex-pairs of socks that have become
      > >>> > halves/only the odd one remains [or is it the even one??], see
      > >>> > explanation above), I'm all ears...
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>> > Starting with 'uneven' for lichy (isn't that too
      > >>> > bookish/old-fashioned?).... could we do something like:
      > >>> >
      > >>> > uneven-eaters
      > >>> > uneveners
      > >>> > unevenators
      > >>> >
      > >>> > ???
      > >>> >
      > >>> > Are there other words that could be used (impair????
      > >>> > impairers/unpairers)???
      > >>> >
      > >>> > TIAVM for comments and suggestions
      > >>> >
      > >>> > Matej
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >>> >
      > >>> >
      > >>>
      > >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
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