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38275Re: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat

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  • James Kirchner
    Dec 1, 2008
      Then we would say "work extra hours".

      Don't forget, there's also "working off the clock", but I don't think
      that's what we're talking about in this case.

      Jamie

      On Dec 1, 2008, at 6:30 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

      > I think it's less flexible and less official than flexitime..
      >
      > If/when your work does not immediatelly affect others and your
      > superior authorises it, you'll come in earlier or stay late one day
      > to be able to get off earlier another day. It's not a system, it's
      > just a possibility, it only works if your work is reasonably
      > independent and when your superior is sensible, remember we're
      > talking blue collar jobs and things like flexitime are usually not
      > available to these people..
      >
      > nadpracovat simply means to work a little in advance to be able to
      > take time off, it can be used for working after taking time off,
      > alth' strictly grammatically and technically it shouldn't be
      >
      > M - musim si ted nadpracovat abych mel zitra volno (ale klienti to
      > asi neuznaji)
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: James Kirchner
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:24 PM
      > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
      >
      > I'm a little confused by the usage. It's flex time if the system is
      > actually flexible, voluntary and somewhat controlled by the employee.
      > If it's a rigid requirement, we don't have a term for the working
      > hours, but for the time off, or for the arrangement of the whole week.
      >
      > flex time = The start and end of the work day can vary, as the
      > employee wishes, and whatever time is lost or gained at the beginning
      > of the day is made up at the end.
      >
      > comp time = extra time off at the end of the week (or at any time) to
      > make up for being forced to work extra hours on a different day.
      >
      > four days on / three days off, or three days on / four days off = the
      > employee is forced to work a longer standard shift each day, but he
      > gets longer weekends.
      >
      > So the system is flex time only if it is flexible and the employee is
      > somewhat in control of it. If the employee isn't in control of it, I
      > would just use a circumlocution.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Dec 1, 2008, at 3:05 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:
      >
      > > Coilin, I think that flextime/flexitime would be appropriate (check
      > > google for the more common spelling). And wait to see what Jamie has
      > > to say, though...
      > >
      > > Jennifer
      > >
      > > On 1.12.2008, at 6:57, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
      > >
      > > > Hi, Coilin!
      > > > I believe you are right, this probably means the possibility to
      > work
      > > > some hours in advance, probably by staying at work longer hours or
      > > > by starting work earlier than required (and then to have the extra
      > > > hours off when I need). HTH.
      > > > Regards,
      > > > Jarda
      > > >
      > > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > > From: coilinoc
      > > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:18 AM
      > > > Subject: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
      > > >
      > > > Hi there,
      > > >
      > > > Does anyone know what this phrase means exactly?
      > > >
      > > > I have very little context:
      > > > It's a text about employers attitudes to foreign employees:
      > > >
      > > > U pracovniku v nemanualnich pracovnich pozicich se jedna zejmena o
      > > > moznost prizpusobit si zacatek a konec pracovni doby, u manualnich
      > > > pracovniku pak spise prilezitost nadpracovat si cast pracovniho
      > dne
      > > > nebo i delsi casovy usek
      > > >
      > > > I don't think it's overtime but some sort of arrangement where you
      > > > work four ten-hour days instead of five eight-hour days to get
      > your
      > > > forty hour week. Am I right in this interpretation? And, if so,
      > what
      > > > would we call that in English? (flexitime?)
      > > >
      > > > MTIA
      > > >
      > > > Coilin
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



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