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35420Re: [Czechlist] ireferaty

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  • James Kirchner
    Feb 1, 2008
      I've never heard of that word being used to be buttocks.

      I see it's in the dictionary listed as archaic. However, it sounds
      less like it refers to the actual buttocks than to what people now
      call the "crack".

      JK

      On Feb 1, 2008, at 8:12 AM, Jan Culka wrote:

      > And breech (= buttocks) is an archaism as well?
      > H.
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: James Kirchner
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, February 01, 2008 2:08 PM
      > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] ireferaty
      >
      > Britches. We also have the word breeches, but those are something
      > people wore centuries ago.
      >
      > JK
      >
      > On Feb 1, 2008, at 8:01 AM, Jan Culka wrote:
      >
      > > britches or breeches?
      > > Honza
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: James Kirchner
      > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Friday, February 01, 2008 1:55 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] ireferaty
      > >
      > > On Feb 1, 2008, at 5:25 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
      > >
      > > > When do you call pants trousers, btw? (and a store a shop - I did
      > > > know this but have forgotten)
      > >
      > > We call trousers pans whenever we want to. There's no rule or
      > > particular time we do it. (What the British ESL books call "pants"
      > > are our underpants.) On rare occasions, we also use the word
      > > "britches", so when we say that a small child has "filled his
      > > britches".
      > >
      > > That whole bit about the vocabulary "differences" between British
      > and
      > > American English is bogus at least 50% of the time. Those lists
      > > usually contain differences that don't exist, and they don't list
      > > differences that do exist. I always wonder who creates them. After
      > > reading those lists all my life, imagine my surprise when I went to
      > > the UK and saw things being sold in "cans". (We usually call an
      > > elegant, decorated can a tin, by the way.)
      > >
      > > In the US, you occasionally (but rarely) get a list like that where
      > > the term that's claimed to be "British" is really cockney rhyming
      > > slang. There's no explanation. They just say the weird term is
      > > "British".
      > >
      > > Jamie
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



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