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30264Re: [Czechlist] CONT.: poptavka vs. nabidka - nabizejici

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  • Jan Culka
    Mar 1 12:03 AM
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      AFAIK, Proposal, Quotation and even Offer are quite equivalent and thus also
      used.
      Bidder is quite kosher, Offerer cannot be seen anywhere, although maybe
      correct.
      Honza


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "kzgafas" <kzgafas@...>
      To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 6:16 AM
      Subject: [Czechlist] CONT.: poptavka vs. nabidka - nabizejici


      > Thank you for this. Request and Quote sound really great for my use.
      > And what about - nabizejici - the party (potential supplier)
      > preparing the Quote? I have tried to use Offerer - but I think there
      > should be something better. Or Bidder - this sounds slangish for my
      > use. Or maybe it is OK(?). Any suggestions for nabizejici?
      >
      > Thank you,
      >
      > K.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Pecinkova - prekladatelsky
      > servis" <preklady@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > An American company I work for quite often uses "RFP" = request
      > for quote
      > > (poptavka) vs. quote (nabidka). And they have heaps of official
      > forms to
      > > support it.
      > > Iveta
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: "kzgafas" <kzgafas@...>
      > > To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 10:23 PM
      > > Subject: [Czechlist] TERMS: poptavka vs. nabidka
      > >
      > >
      > > > Context:
      > > > A large telecom company needs to choose among more suppliers of
      > > > speficic devices. So they issue poptavka (poptavkovy dokument) to
      > > > these suppliers to make their nabidka to the telecom company so
      > that
      > > > the company can choose the best offer (price vs. quality). How
      > would
      > > > you render poptavka and nabidka in this context? Quite frankly,
      > I have
      > > > never felt really comfortable in rendering this pair (nabidka vs.
      > > > poptavka) in English. May I use "bid" for nabidka? Isnt it too
      > > > slangish? I am looking for something that would fit into a
      > formal and
      > > > carefully prepared (official) poptavkovy dokument.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Thank you,
      > > >
      > > > K.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Useful resource of the week:
      > > > http://tinyurl.com
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Useful resource of the week:
      > http://tinyurl.com
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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