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UNIVERSAL PICTURES AND LUDLUM ENTERTAINMENT MAKE LONG-TERM DEAL TO CONTINUE BOURNE FRANCHISE

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  • Ed Homa
    UNIVERSAL PICTURES AND LUDLUM ENTERTAINMENT MAKE LONG-TERM DEAL TO CONTINUE BOURNE FRANCHISE Fourth Bourne Movie Anticipated for Release in Summer 2010
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 15, 2009
      UNIVERSAL PICTURES AND LUDLUM ENTERTAINMENT MAKE LONG-TERM DEAL TO CONTINUE BOURNE FRANCHISE

      Fourth Bourne Movie Anticipated for Release in Summer 2010

      UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif., Nov. 21 /PRNewswire/ - Executives from Universal Pictures and Ludlum Entertainment announced today that they have entered into a long-term deal that gives Universal the exclusive rights to continue making films based on the Jason Bourne character. The Bourne franchise has been one of Universal's most popular and profitable franchises with "The Bourne Identity," "The Bourne Supremacy" and "The Bourne Ultimatum" grossing a total of almost $1 billion worldwide at the box office, while 30 million copies have been sold in North America alone since the series debut in home entertainment.

      "The Bourne films have redefined the action genre with their smart and fast-paced approach," said President of Production for Universal Pictures Donna Langley. "We look forward to bringing more Bourne stories to fans all over the globe."

      Added Co-President of Production and Executive Vice President of Universal Pictures Jimmy Horowitz, "The Bourne franchise is one of our crown jewels at Universal. We are thrilled to be in business with our partners from Ludlum Entertainment for the foreseeable future."

      In the fourth film, which is currently in development, Matt Damon will return as trained assassin Jason Bourne for the latest showdown. The espionage thriller will reunite Damon with Academy Award(R)-nominated director Paul Greengrass ("United 93," "The Bourne Supremacy," "The Bourne Ultimatum," upcoming "Green Zone"). George Nolfi ("The Bourne Ultimatum," "Ocean's Twelve") will pen the script, and Frank Marshall (The Bourne series, Indiana Jones series) and Jeffrey Weiner from Ludlum Entertainment will produce.

      "We're glad that an agreement was reached that keeps the Bourne franchise with Universal Pictures for many years to come and creates the opportunity to jointly develop new projects in the future," said Jeffrey Weiner, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Ludlum Entertainment.
      The agreement includes a first-look producing deal for Ludlum Entertainment to develop other properties in its library with Universal. The studio currently has in development "The Sigma Protocol," based on the popular book owned by Ludlum Entertainment. The deal with Universal was negotiated by Weiner for Ludlum Entertainment.
       
       


      Ludlum legacy keeps studios on the move

      by Anthony Breznican - Mar. 26, 2009 12:00 AM
      USA TODAY

      His titles always followed the same pattern: The (proper noun) (noun).

      Thanks to Hollywood, Robert Ludlum is a writer re-Bourne

      Jason Bourne has been good to his father.

      Hollywood had forgotten the late thriller writer Robert Ludlum until the trilogy of Matt Damon blockbusters reignited interest in his novels about rogue heroes, sinister cabals and byzantine global treachery.

      Now, eight years after his death, the best-selling author is back in style.

      "We most likely wouldn't be having this conversation if it wasn't for the success of The Bourne Identity,' " says Jeffrey Weiner, executor of the author's estate and CEO of Ludlum Entertainment.

      Weiner and producing partner Ben Smith are shepherding several Ludlum stories through their movie production company, Captivate Entertainment, and attracting interest from such stars as Tom Cruise, Denzel Washington and Leonardo DiCaprio.

      In the pipeline: "The Matarese Circle" stars Washington as a CIA agent who teams with his Russian rival (Cruise is in negotiations) to foil a ring of assassins. David Cronenberg will direct for MGM.

      And DiCaprio is looking to produce and star in "The Chancellor Manuscript," about a novelist whose thrillers hit too close to home for some government officials.

      Ludlum died in 2001 at 73, a little more than a year before the debut of "The Bourne Identity." Since then, the three movies have earned Universal about $945 million worldwide, not counting DVD or TV grosses.

      Smith, who helped set up the first Damon film, says Ludlum is viable because of the David vs. Goliath themes. "They're all about one or two people up against huge government conspiracies, multinational conspiracies, terrorist threats and military conspiracies."

      But Ludlum also rooted his novels in the Cold War, which is why they often are updated for the screen. After the Cold War, his books felt dated, which may explain why studios stopped paying attention.

      "Classic works, whether it's Nobel Prize literature or works of popular fiction, can have a life long after their initial publication," says Jeffrey Berg, CEO of talent agency ICM, which has helped bring Ludlum back into the spotlight. "We've been able to create a whole second bounce on these properties."
      Meanwhile, Universal, Captivate and ICM are assembling what Smith calls "the jewel in the crown": a fourth Bourne movie. "Everything is under wraps," he says when asked for a teaser. "I mean, come on, really."

      - Anthony Breznican, USA TODAY
       


      So consider this "The Ludlum Renaissance."

      The late thriller novelist Robert Ludlum is in comeback mode. Matt Damon's Bourne films have cleared a path for some of his other projects to head to the multiplex and reinvigorated the author's status with a new generation of readers, not to mention inspiring new video games.
      ICM chairman and CEO Jeffrey Berg, whose agency has been critical in resurrecting Ludlum's Hollywood profile, said the writer's plots about individuals trapped in a world out-of-control are striking a nerve again.

      "The Ludlum estate has become the indirect beneficiary of a lot of these economic and political changes in the world today," Berg says.
      Here's a look at some of the films being developed:

      Untitled Jason Bourne 4. Frank Marshall, the heavyweight producer behind these films, confirms he is developing a fourth one, though it's still in the earliest possible stages. The other two major forces behind Bourne, Matt Damon and director Paul Greengrass, are not yet confirmed. Unlike the others, this Bourne will not be based on an existing Ludlum book, says Ben Smith, president of Captivate Entertainment, which manages film rights to Ludlum's novels. "It will definitely be set up as a continuation of the Jason Bourne story," Smith says, noting that "all of the Bourne films have borrowed a lot thematically and with the characters but have varied greatly from the novels."

      "The Matarese Circle." Denzel Washington plays a CIA agent, and Tom Cruise is negotiating to play his Russian rival, two longtime foes who join forces to stop a ring of international assassins, though what they really want to do is kill each other. David Cronenberg, director of "Eastern Promises" and 1983's "The Dead Zone," also has signed on. MGM hopes to begin shooting this year.

      "The Chancellor Manuscript." Paramount Pictures has the rights, and Leonardo DiCaprio's representatives say he is looking to produce and star. The plot involves a Washington, D.C., novelist whose fictional thriller about politicians being blackmailed makes some powerful government officials think he knows something he really doesn't. "He's a different kind of character. He's like an Everyman," says Jeffrey Weiner, executor of the Ludlum estate and CEO of Ludlum Entertainment and Captivate.

      "The Parsifal Mosaic." An American spy's lover is killed by his own agency after they expose her as a Russian double-agent. But he begins seeing her alive during his travels, and is either losing his mind or finding out her "death" was part of an elaborate deception. When Universal Pictures signed a deal last year getting exclusive rights to amnesiac special agent Bourne, it also secured first dibs on adapting Ludlum's other works. Parsifal was one such project. "We're at the kickoff right now," Smith says.

      "The Sigma Protocol." Another film at Universal, this is the last novel Ludlum finished. "It's set within the financial world of today and involves a secret organization that is behind the scenes controlling major world events for their benefit," says Smith. Brazilian filmmaker Jose Padilha has signed on for this, his first English-language film, after international success with his 2007 action-drama "Tropa de Elite (Elite Squad)." No stars have signed on yet.
      "The Osterman Weekend." Even Ludlum's weekends were apparently full of intrigue. In this story, a TV newsman discovers that his closest friends are secret agents trying to undermine the U.S. government. Instead of a lone hero facing down an evil, anonymous conglomerate, this story "is more of an ensemble cast than having a single Jason Bourne-type character," says Weiner. The film rights were picked up by Summit Entertainment, which also makes the "Twilight" movies. "Osterman" was previously made into a movie in 1983, directed by Sam Peckinpah (his last film).




    • Muneeb Saeed
      this is good!!! ... -- ~muneeb http://muneebsaeed.blogspot.com/
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 15, 2009
        this is good!!!

        On Wed, Apr 15, 2009 at 6:52 PM, Ed Homa <thunderball302@...> wrote:


        UNIVERSAL PICTURES AND LUDLUM ENTERTAINMENT MAKE LONG-TERM DEAL TO CONTINUE BOURNE FRANCHISE

        Fourth Bourne Movie Anticipated for Release in Summer 2010

        UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif., Nov. 21 /PRNewswire/ - Executives from Universal Pictures and Ludlum Entertainment announced today that they have entered into a long-term deal that gives Universal the exclusive rights to continue making films based on the Jason Bourne character. The Bourne franchise has been one of Universal's most popular and profitable franchises with "The Bourne Identity," "The Bourne Supremacy" and "The Bourne Ultimatum" grossing a total of almost $1 billion worldwide at the box office, while 30 million copies have been sold in North America alone since the series debut in home entertainment.

        "The Bourne films have redefined the action genre with their smart and fast-paced approach," said President of Production for Universal Pictures Donna Langley. "We look forward to bringing more Bourne stories to fans all over the globe."

        Added Co-President of Production and Executive Vice President of Universal Pictures Jimmy Horowitz, "The Bourne franchise is one of our crown jewels at Universal. We are thrilled to be in business with our partners from Ludlum Entertainment for the foreseeable future."

        In the fourth film, which is currently in development, Matt Damon will return as trained assassin Jason Bourne for the latest showdown. The espionage thriller will reunite Damon with Academy Award(R)-nominated director Paul Greengrass ("United 93," "The Bourne Supremacy," "The Bourne Ultimatum," upcoming "Green Zone"). George Nolfi ("The Bourne Ultimatum," "Ocean's Twelve") will pen the script, and Frank Marshall (The Bourne series, Indiana Jones series) and Jeffrey Weiner from Ludlum Entertainment will produce.

        "We're glad that an agreement was reached that keeps the Bourne franchise with Universal Pictures for many years to come and creates the opportunity to jointly develop new projects in the future," said Jeffrey Weiner, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Ludlum Entertainment.
        The agreement includes a first-look producing deal for Ludlum Entertainment to develop other properties in its library with Universal. The studio currently has in development "The Sigma Protocol," based on the popular book owned by Ludlum Entertainment. The deal with Universal was negotiated by Weiner for Ludlum Entertainment.
         
         


        Ludlum legacy keeps studios on the move

        by Anthony Breznican - Mar. 26, 2009 12:00 AM
        USA TODAY

        His titles always followed the same pattern: The (proper noun) (noun).

        Thanks to Hollywood, Robert Ludlum is a writer re-Bourne

        Jason Bourne has been good to his father.

        Hollywood had forgotten the late thriller writer Robert Ludlum until the trilogy of Matt Damon blockbusters reignited interest in his novels about rogue heroes, sinister cabals and byzantine global treachery.

        Now, eight years after his death, the best-selling author is back in style.

        "We most likely wouldn't be having this conversation if it wasn't for the success of The Bourne Identity,' " says Jeffrey Weiner, executor of the author's estate and CEO of Ludlum Entertainment.

        Weiner and producing partner Ben Smith are shepherding several Ludlum stories through their movie production company, Captivate Entertainment, and attracting interest from such stars as Tom Cruise, Denzel Washington and Leonardo DiCaprio.

        In the pipeline: "The Matarese Circle" stars Washington as a CIA agent who teams with his Russian rival (Cruise is in negotiations) to foil a ring of assassins. David Cronenberg will direct for MGM.

        And DiCaprio is looking to produce and star in "The Chancellor Manuscript," about a novelist whose thrillers hit too close to home for some government officials.

        Ludlum died in 2001 at 73, a little more than a year before the debut of "The Bourne Identity." Since then, the three movies have earned Universal about $945 million worldwide, not counting DVD or TV grosses.

        Smith, who helped set up the first Damon film, says Ludlum is viable because of the David vs. Goliath themes. "They're all about one or two people up against huge government conspiracies, multinational conspiracies, terrorist threats and military conspiracies."

        But Ludlum also rooted his novels in the Cold War, which is why they often are updated for the screen. After the Cold War, his books felt dated, which may explain why studios stopped paying attention.

        "Classic works, whether it's Nobel Prize literature or works of popular fiction, can have a life long after their initial publication," says Jeffrey Berg, CEO of talent agency ICM, which has helped bring Ludlum back into the spotlight. "We've been able to create a whole second bounce on these properties."
        Meanwhile, Universal, Captivate and ICM are assembling what Smith calls "the jewel in the crown": a fourth Bourne movie. "Everything is under wraps," he says when asked for a teaser. "I mean, come on, really."

        - Anthony Breznican, USA TODAY
         


        So consider this "The Ludlum Renaissance."

        The late thriller novelist Robert Ludlum is in comeback mode. Matt Damon's Bourne films have cleared a path for some of his other projects to head to the multiplex and reinvigorated the author's status with a new generation of readers, not to mention inspiring new video games.
        ICM chairman and CEO Jeffrey Berg, whose agency has been critical in resurrecting Ludlum's Hollywood profile, said the writer's plots about individuals trapped in a world out-of-control are striking a nerve again.

        "The Ludlum estate has become the indirect beneficiary of a lot of these economic and political changes in the world today," Berg says.
        Here's a look at some of the films being developed:

        Untitled Jason Bourne 4. Frank Marshall, the heavyweight producer behind these films, confirms he is developing a fourth one, though it's still in the earliest possible stages. The other two major forces behind Bourne, Matt Damon and director Paul Greengrass, are not yet confirmed. Unlike the others, this Bourne will not be based on an existing Ludlum book, says Ben Smith, president of Captivate Entertainment, which manages film rights to Ludlum's novels. "It will definitely be set up as a continuation of the Jason Bourne story," Smith says, noting that "all of the Bourne films have borrowed a lot thematically and with the characters but have varied greatly from the novels."

        "The Matarese Circle." Denzel Washington plays a CIA agent, and Tom Cruise is negotiating to play his Russian rival, two longtime foes who join forces to stop a ring of international assassins, though what they really want to do is kill each other. David Cronenberg, director of "Eastern Promises" and 1983's "The Dead Zone," also has signed on. MGM hopes to begin shooting this year.

        "The Chancellor Manuscript." Paramount Pictures has the rights, and Leonardo DiCaprio's representatives say he is looking to produce and star. The plot involves a Washington, D.C., novelist whose fictional thriller about politicians being blackmailed makes some powerful government officials think he knows something he really doesn't. "He's a different kind of character. He's like an Everyman," says Jeffrey Weiner, executor of the Ludlum estate and CEO of Ludlum Entertainment and Captivate.

        "The Parsifal Mosaic." An American spy's lover is killed by his own agency after they expose her as a Russian double-agent. But he begins seeing her alive during his travels, and is either losing his mind or finding out her "death" was part of an elaborate deception. When Universal Pictures signed a deal last year getting exclusive rights to amnesiac special agent Bourne, it also secured first dibs on adapting Ludlum's other works. Parsifal was one such project. "We're at the kickoff right now," Smith says.

        "The Sigma Protocol." Another film at Universal, this is the last novel Ludlum finished. "It's set within the financial world of today and involves a secret organization that is behind the scenes controlling major world events for their benefit," says Smith. Brazilian filmmaker Jose Padilha has signed on for this, his first English-language film, after international success with his 2007 action-drama "Tropa de Elite (Elite Squad)." No stars have signed on yet.
        "The Osterman Weekend." Even Ludlum's weekends were apparently full of intrigue. In this story, a TV newsman discovers that his closest friends are secret agents trying to undermine the U.S. government. Instead of a lone hero facing down an evil, anonymous conglomerate, this story "is more of an ensemble cast than having a single Jason Bourne-type character," says Weiner. The film rights were picked up by Summit Entertainment, which also makes the "Twilight" movies. "Osterman" was previously made into a movie in 1983, directed by Sam Peckinpah (his last film).







        --
        ~muneeb
        http://muneebsaeed.blogspot.com/

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