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Indonesia Faults Bird-Flu Illness For Man's Death

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  • Walter Lippmann
    ( Iran, Iraq, Cuba, North Korea, Bolivia and Myanmar were among the 23 countries supporting Indonesia s argument that the existing system of unconditional
    Message 1 of 1 , May 31, 2007
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      ("Iran, Iraq, Cuba, North Korea, Bolivia and Myanmar were among
      the 23 countries supporting Indonesia's argument that the existing
      system of unconditional sample-sharing was unfair to poorer nations,
      because they couldn't afford commercial vaccines.")
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      June 1, 2007
      AVIAN FLU: PREVENTING A PANDEMIC

      Indonesia Faults Bird-Flu Illness For Man's Death
      Associated Press
      June 1, 2007

      JAKARTA, Indonesia -- An Indonesian man died of bird flu, bringing
      the death toll in the country hardest hit by the virus to 78, a
      health ministry official said.

      The country's latest victim of the H5N1 virus came from a village in
      central Java province, said Muhammad Nadirin, an official at the
      Health Ministry. The 45-year-old died Monday after being hospitalized
      for two days, he said.

      The man had slaughtered, cooked and then eaten an infected chicken
      one week before he developed bird-flu symptoms on May 17, he said.

      Meanwhile, Indonesian Health Minister Siti Fadilah Supari said
      Thursday that anti-U.S. sentiment contributed to Indonesia's success
      in leading developing countries to push the World Health Organization
      into agreeing to change a 50-year-old influenza virus-sharing system.

      Iran, Iraq, Cuba, North Korea, Bolivia and Myanmar were among the 23
      countries supporting Indonesia's argument that the existing system of
      unconditional sample-sharing was unfair to poorer nations, because
      they couldn't afford commercial vaccines.

      The preliminary deal, reached at the World Health Assembly on May 2,
      outlines in broad terms how governments will work together to combat
      the threat of bird flu. It includes a tentative agreement to share
      virus samples, but its implementation is voluntary, and exceptions
      are possible.

      Copyright C 2007 Associated Press
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