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Re: Valve Stems for Tubeless Tires

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  • crosley19
    Pete, I don t get upset. I just worry that someone will have an accident, because they are not using safety bead rims. Just because someone did not have any
    Message 1 of 18 , Jan 1, 2010
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      Pete, I don't get upset. I just worry that someone will have an accident, because they are not using safety bead rims. Just because someone did not have any problem with running tubeless on Crosley rims, still does not make it safe. I ended up in a freshly planted corn field with my Supersport. I was only doing about 40 (on a 35 mph curve). I am sure 35 lbs of air will hold the tire on the bead, but like I said it defeats the purpose of the steel belted radial to ride soft.
      The safety rim came out around 1950, I think Chrysler started it. It has an extra bump just before the bead area. All rims are built with the safety bead since 1960, they just don't have the high bump that Chrysler had. I had a 51 Plymouth, and I almost wrecked the tire changer trying to get my tires off of the rims to put snow tires on. Happy New Year Everyone!
      Barry



      --- In Crosley_Gang@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Berard" <berard_m@...> wrote:
      >
      > Maybe I unintentionally started something here that might gripe my friend Barry Seel, and I don't want to imply he ain't one of the top advisers for this most important informational site for us Cros threaded nuts.
      >
      > If he says the tires, tyres, tars, will roll off if they ain't fit for our Crosley wheels, then that's the answer. And I'll have to consider myself lucky to have had no bad results. (not pushing up daises)
      >
      > I remember when the 1949 Plymouth came out with a special rim that made tire changers cuss. Maybe this was the pre-cuss-ser to the tubeless tar. Seems like it had an extra small flange just inside of the outer rim lip that was supposed to prevent the bead from leaving the outer flange under extreme side loads. According to what I remember it also permitted the tire man to lose his sole while installing new rubber.
      >
      > Any one know just when this tubeless thing was born?
      > I recall the general response from my dad and other automotive folks who made a living on cars. It was most humorous. And unmentionable here. Said it'd never work, and other stuff that you might imagine.
      >
      > HAPPY NEW YEAR............pete & julie
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Rich Helm
      > To: Crosley_Gang@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 6:28 PM
      > Subject: Re: [Crosley_Gang] Valve Stems for Tubeless Tires
      >
      >
      >
      > 
      >
      > I agree with these last two. I've had tubeless radials for several years on the original rims with no problems.
      > Rich
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: PHILIP E ROWLAND
      > To: Crosley_Gang@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 3:27 PM
      > Subject: Re: [Crosley_Gang] Valve Stems for Tubeless Tires
      >
      >
      >
      > My '49 sedan has been running tubeless for years with no problems. I think tires must be underinflated, or the car being driven crazily, for them to come off the rims. Phil
      >
      > --- On Thu, 12/31/09, Peter Berard <berard_m@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Peter Berard <berard_m@...>
      > Subject: Re: [Crosley_Gang] Valve Stems for Tubeless Tires
      > To: Crosley_Gang@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Thursday, December 31, 2009, 9:00 AM
      >
      >
      >
      > My 48 truck came with tubeless biased tires when I purchased it. They might have bored the holes larger. So far I've had no problems with these tires and they haven't lost any significant pressure in two years....... ..pete
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Joe
      > To: Crosley_Gang@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Wednesday, December 30, 2009 10:06 PM
      > Subject: [Crosley_Gang] Valve Stems for Tubeless Tires
      >
      >
      >
      > At least on a trial basis I was planning to install 155 R 12 tubeless radial tires on the original Crosley wheels. There are two standard size valve stems for tubeless tires, 0.453 inch and 0.625 inch. The 0.453 is too small for the valve hole on the Crosley wheel. The 0.625 seems to large. Any suggestions other than install a tube?
      >
    • Jim_Bollman
      Tire facts according to the AACA Judging book, not necessarily the absolute last word but they have been fine tuning some of start dates for things for many
      Message 2 of 18 , Jan 1, 2010
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        Tire facts according to the AACA Judging book, not necessarily the absolute last word but they have been fine tuning some of start dates for things for many years. Tubeless tires were introduced for cars and light trucks in 1955 and heavy trucks in 1956.

        Radials are a little more fuzzy with foreign cars being ahead of US and US makers phasing them in, but it was mid to late 60s for most makes/models.

        I have only ran radials on one Crosley (with tubes) and didn't like how it handled at the proper inflation and ran them around 28-30 lbs.

        Jim...

        --- In Crosley_Gang@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Berard" <berard_m@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Any one know just when this tubeless thing was born?
        > I recall the general response from my dad and other automotive folks who made a living on cars. It was most humorous. And unmentionable here. Said it'd never work, and other stuff that you might imagine.
      • Joe McKee
        There were no tire stores in my area that had a clue where to get tubes for 12 radial tires.  I ended up ordering FR12 radial tire tubes from
        Message 3 of 18 , Jan 2, 2010
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          There were no tire stores in my area that had a clue where to get tubes for 12" radial tires.  I ended up ordering FR12 radial tire tubes from otr-offroadtire.com.  The tires are Kumho 155 80 12 ordered from atw-tires, which is an Ebay store.  Tires look good..  I will be safe and sound now.


          From: crosley19 <CROSLEY19@...>
          To: Crosley_Gang@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thu, December 31, 2009 6:17:38 AM
          Subject: [Crosley_Gang] Re: Valve Stems for Tubeless Tires

           

          Tubes are readily available for the P155R12 tires for any big tire store. If they don't have them they can get them in a couple of days.
          Barry

          --- In Crosley_Gang@ yahoogroups. com, "Jim_Bollman" <Jim.Bollman@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > You really need to use tubes rated for radial tires. You might get by with standard tubes for awhile if they are new but the extra rubbing from the flex of the radial tires can/will cause leaks. By this time maybe all tubes are radial safe, since I don't know why they wouldn't work in bias ply tires.
          >
          > Years ago a friend had 3 or 4 flats from tubes springing a leak with his new radial tires and that was in the first 200-300 miles.
          >
          > Jim...
          >
          > --- In Crosley_Gang@ yahoogroups. com, Joe McKee <mckeejm66@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Where did you get your tire tubes?  Did you use standard 12" tubes or radial tire tubes?  Thanks.
          > >
          > >
          >


        • Tom McDowell
          I will put my two cents worth here and then let it drop. Cars of the thirties, forties fifties & sixties were not designed or built  for radial tires,
          Message 4 of 18 , Jan 4, 2010
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            I will put my two cents worth here and then let it drop. Cars of the thirties, forties fifties & sixties were not designed or built  for radial tires, "Precious" is still running now 61 year old original rubber tires because I don't like the way the newer tires look or fit, they either look like a truck tire or do not fit on the rim bead properly, I did find a set 5.30X12 for our 48 CC wagon "Merlin" but don't know how they will look with the body on the chassis. That said, I have a freind that owns a 1953 Kaiser Manhattan with radials, 1 the car sits too low and drags the rear bumper, 2 the tires transmit every single little bump and or bebble up through the steering column shaking the horn ring. and finally I have a 1948 Frazer sedan that I put Coker 7.10X15 bias ply wide white wall tires along with tubes on the car, of couse I drive this to the meets either in or out of state around 60 to 75 MPH.


            From: Jim_Bollman <Jim.Bollman@...>
            To: Crosley_Gang@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Fri, January 1, 2010 7:40:29 AM
            Subject: [Crosley_Gang] Re: Valve Stems for Tubeless Tires

             

            Tire facts according to the AACA Judging book, not necessarily the absolute last word but they have been fine tuning some of start dates for things for many years. Tubeless tires were introduced for cars and light trucks in 1955 and heavy trucks in 1956.

            Radials are a little more fuzzy with foreign cars being ahead of US and US makers phasing them in, but it was mid to late 60s for most makes/models.

            I have only ran radials on one Crosley (with tubes) and didn't like how it handled at the proper inflation and ran them around 28-30 lbs.

            Jim...

            --- In Crosley_Gang@ yahoogroups. com, "Peter Berard" <berard_m@.. .> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Any one know just when this tubeless thing was born?
            > I recall the general response from my dad and other automotive folks who made a living on cars. It was most humorous. And unmentionable here. Said it'd never work, and other stuff that you might imagine.


          • Fred
            Crosley supplied dealers with Michelin X radial tires & radial tubes at the end of the run in 1952. I have the wrappers from Crosley Motors, shipped Railway
            Message 5 of 18 , Jan 4, 2010
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              Crosley supplied dealers with Michelin X radial tires & radial tubes at the end of the run in 1952. I have the wrappers from Crosley Motors, shipped Railway Express to FMR motors in North Dakota. They were a metric size tire 125X300 or something like that. Charlie Nicholas a Fairmont, MN dealer confirmed that they were available but he said they were cheaper from Michelin at the time. I will look for the wrappers - sorry, no tires - when it warms up. Any size too large will interfere when turning.
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