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Re: new member with Gasporter

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  • Robert Kirk
    Welcome Bob!  The shear rarity of what you have, let alone a serviceable serving vehicle makes it rather difficult to point you in a direction.  I none the
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 4, 2012
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      Welcome Bob!  The shear rarity of what you have, let alone a serviceable serving vehicle makes it rather difficult to point you in a direction.  I none the less applaud your good choice in getting "A Fine Gasporter" to coin a phrase. 

      For starters it was made by Engineering Research Associates in St Paul MN.  A bunch of top notch WWII vets trying to parley what they learned in the military into something profitable.  It is no doubt those contacts which led them to Powell Crosley who was a moving force in support of the US military in the day.  It would make a good research to follow how the Gasporter came to be via the ERA  team and Powell Crosley. 

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engineering_Research_Associates








      Regards,
      Robert Kirk
       

    • LouRugani
      ... Hi everyone. I have recently purchased a nice Crosley Gasporter and knew absolutely nothing about them except that they existed and I wanted one. I will
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 8, 2012
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        --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, "Bob" <n6346m@...> wrote:

        "Hi everyone. I have recently purchased a nice Crosley Gasporter and knew absolutely nothing about them except that they existed and I wanted one. I will be using it for its intended purpose of refueling my 1943 and 1948 vintage airplanes. To start with I am looking for any operator's manuals, parts manuals or any other literature pertaining to the Gasporter. I have already ordered parts and shop manuals for the Crosley truck platform so I am looking for stuff that pertains to the Gasporter portion of the vehicle. I would also like to hear from any other Gasporter owners so we can compare notes. Thanks."
        Bob Picard
        Anchor Point, Alaska
        907-235-2398
        ==================
        Great find, Bob, and congratulations, especially for pressing the Gasporter into its original intent! Our Paul Gorrell has a restored Gasporter, and we have Gaspoerter literature in our Photos collection.

        There was a scandal at the time with the firm that built the Gasporters, having to do with one of the Navy's most closely guarded secrets, a project that had priority over the atomic bomb during the war, considered so secret that some parts are still classified. The Navy entrusted this vital project with its complex engineering and construction to the firm that built the Crosley Gasporters: Engineering Research Associates of St. Paul, Minn. Founded during World War II, the Navy officers who had made the deal later turned up as highly salaried vice presidents of the company. E. R. C. was originally called Northwest Aeronautic Corporation, and had gotten an "unfavorable" report by Booz, Allen and Hamilton, of Washington. D. C., management consultants. Despite this, it was reported that at least twelve established companies were better qualified to do that work, but still the Navy awarded its secret contract, No. 28176, to E. R.A. in February, 1946. The Navy officers who arranged for E. R. A. to get this juicy contract were Capt. Ralph Meader, wartime commander of the Navy Computing Machine Laboratory at Dayton, Ohio; Capt. Howard Engstrom, former Itr-search Director for Naval Communications; and Comdr. William C. Norris of the same office. All three later joined E. R. A. as vice presidents. Meader soon sold out his interest In E.R.A. for $30.000. However, his contract contained a mysterious clause that he could not bring charges against the company after his resignation. Neither Meader nor E. R. A.'s attorney James Clifford could explain what E. R. A. had to hide that such a clause should be inserted.

        More Gasporter research to come. Can you send some photos?

        Lou Rugani, co-moderator, CCOC
      • LouRugani
        -- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, Bob wrote: Hi everyone. I have recently purchased a nice Crosley Gasporter and knew absolutely nothing about
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 9, 2012
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          -- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, "Bob" <n6346m@...> wrote:
          "Hi everyone. I have recently purchased a nice Crosley Gasporter and knew absolutely nothing about them except that they existed and I wanted one. I will be using it for its intended purpose of refueling my 1943 and 1948 vintage airplanes. To start with I am looking for any operator's manuals, parts manuals or any other literature pertaining to the Gasporter. I have already ordered parts and shop manuals for the Crosley truck platform so I am looking for stuff that pertains to the Gasporter portion of the vehicle. I would also like to hear from any other Gasporter owners so we can compare notes. Thanks."
          Bob Picard
          Anchor Point, Alaska
          907-235-2398
          ========
          Bob, here's much of what we know on the Gasporters:

          At the end of World War II, an elite group of Navy code breakers created Engineering Research Associates, Inc. (ERA) in St. Paul MN, a company whose top-secret work helped to launch the world's computer industry. Few people knew its secrets. Most still don't. Yet in the 1940s and early 1950s, its engineers were quietly making history and turning the Twin Cities into a high-tech power.

          UNIVAC, Control Data, Cray Research and scores more can trace their roots to that original ERA site at the corner of Prior and Minnehaha Avenues. William Norris, famed for leading Control Data, was a founder of ERA; he died in 2006.

          The Gasporters were built at 1902 Minnehaha Avenue. In the St. Paul Pioneer Press of August 20, 1986 there's an article about the 40th anniversary of ERA with a photo of Bill Geiger, Bob MacDonald and Jack Nichols unveiling a plaque reading: "Engineering Research Associates, the forerunner of Sperry's Minnesota presence, is the acknowledged parent of some 100 Twin Cities computer firms. In commemoration of the 40th anniversary of ERA's founding, this plaque is placed on the company's original manufacturing site this 19th day of August 1986." It was mounted atop a 36"-tall stone and concrete monument. At some unknown time, the next resident/owner removed this structure and the plaque.

          The building went up as a cast-iron radiator foundry in 1938. ERA took over the foundry during WW II and built gliders there. In 1956 you could see the overhead tracks still in place that were used to move glider parts around the plant. Even then a significant part of the building still had dirt floors.

          Engineering Research Associates, which developed and built the Gasporters, was part of a secret WW-II Navy Lab in Indianapolis that developed analog computers to break the enemies' codes during WW-II and later pioneered computers. Some of ERA's projects are still classified Top Secret to this day.

          During the war, the Navy had assembled in Washington an elite group of engineers, mathematicians, physicists and cryptologists. Their job: to crack the enemy's secret codes, which required creating the world's most sophisticated analytical machines. They succeeded. One of those key code breakers was Navy Lieutenant Bill Norris, who proposed that after the war ended, preserve the group in a private company where they could continue top-secret work on a contract basis. The Navy brass liked the idea, but corporate America did not.

          Major corporations rejected it, being eager to resume civilian work. Finally, the code breakers pitched the plan to John Parker, a Washington investment banker. Parker had run a factory in St. Paul that made wooden gliders during the war and was searching for a postwar venture.

          Parker met with Adm. Chester Nimitz, former commander of the Pacific Fleet. "All Admiral Nimitz said to me, as he tapped me on the chest, was, 'I've looked into your background, and there's a job that I would like to have you do.' And he said, 'It may be more important in peacetime than it is in wartime.' And I said, 'Aye-aye, sir.' I had no idea what I was going to do."

          With Parker's financial support, the core group of code breakers and engineers was kept intact. The new private company was launched in January 1946, and one by one, 40 world-class scientists moved from Washington to St. Paul and to the drafty old government glider factory at 1902 Minnehaha Avenue, freezing in wintertime, sweltering in summer and a haven for birds. "We had to come in and sweep off our desks in the morning, because the birds left their calling cards." From that beginning, the world's computer industry started.

          The young engineers and mathematicians got shares of ERA's closely held stock, and joined the workers who'd built 1,500 wooden gliders during the war, as well as Navy personnel who provided security. The Navy began to issue top-secret contracts.

          "It was a felony to disclose at the time, back there, that you were in this business of code-breaking and the development of the computer business for doing this code work," Parker said. People assigned to classified projects worked in tight-knit teams; those outside that circle knew nothing about them.

          Although it functioned as a high-level job shop for Naval intelligence, ERA also hoped to develop profitable businesses on the outside, including the development of the Crosley-powered Gasporter, a scale to weigh iron-ore cars; airline early-reservations systems, and how to make Pearson Candy's complicated Seven-Up candy bar.

          ERA's Arnold Cohen, in a 1983 interview, said "One of NAC's products that was already completed, and being marketed as an ERA product at the time I came, was what they called the Gasporter - the ERA Gasporter. It was a miniature fueling truck for fueling small aircraft at small airports. And at the time, right after the war, did you ever hear of the Crosley car? There were several subcompact cars, we call them subcompact today, that were on the market. One was the Crosley, that you used to see running around. There was also a Crosley truck, and here they attempted to fit the Crosley truck with a large fuel tank so that they had this miniature servicing thing. I guess that was too much of a load for the Crosley truck because they were always stripping the transmission or the differential or something every time they tried to accelerate, so it didn't work out as a product. But it was being promoted. There was a lot of product literature, and I would suspect that in the stuff that Russ Headley archived over at Univac we should be able to get our hands on some of that if they don't care to keep it. If they want to promise to keep it, fine, that's good. But it ought to be catalogued. There was a lot of that early product literature (and a lot of non-product literature) - advertising, feelers and testing the market to see if there were a market for such a product, based on some things that might have been done in the laboratory just up to a certain point. There was a parallel thing to this ERA Gasporter. It was officially called the ERA Lavatory Porter, but it got to be known affectionately as the privy-porter. It was built on a sturdier chassis, on a Jeep. I guess they sold some of these things. These all related to the aviation industry, and John Parker, of course, had good connections throughout that industry."

          (A recollection by Harry Wise: "When I first came to Remington Rand Univac in 1956 there were still Crosley parts tucked into corners around the old plant.")

          Back when punch cards and paper tape were the cutting edge of data storage, ERA introduced a digital storage system that was revolutionary in every sense.

          At the same time the Gasporter was being marketed, ERA invented a top-secret digital data storage system code-named Goldberg. "It's no different than the standard hard drive that's in your computer, a hard drive that spins," Misa said. "There are a zillion neat engineering tricks between the Goldberg scheme and today, but it's the same principle — to store data in the binary, the zeroes and ones."

          The question of who built the first computer is controversial. Huge patent wars have been fought over the claim, and even today, clear answers are hard to come by. But some ERA veterans believe St. Paul was the birthplace of the first general-purpose computer, code-named Atlas.

          ERA President John Parker sold the company for $1.7 million (about $14 million today) to Remington-Rand in Connecticut. By then, ERA had grown to 850 employees, most in St. Paul.

          In the end, it didn't lead to Minnesota becoming Silicon Valley. But from that first drafty factory in St. Paul, ERA spawned a rich legacy of innovation and jobs and wealth. And to a degree, it still does.
        • Bob Picard
          Lou, Thanks for your posting. I don t have ant pictures to post yet I should have some soon. I just got it running after many years of sitting idle outside. It
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 9, 2012
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            Lou,
            Thanks for your posting. I don't have ant pictures to post yet I should have some soon. I just got it running after many years of sitting idle outside. It runs pretty good and I have some issues with the brakes that need to be resolved. I looked inside the tank and it looks amazingly good for its age. As expected, there is some gunk and rust at the bottom but no scale or bad spots. It will clean up nicely. What I really need now is an owner's manual and a parts manual for the gasporter part. I was able to get manuals for the Crosley truck part of it already.

            Bob Picard
            Anchor Point, Alaska

            --- On Mon, 10/8/12, LouRugani <x779@...> wrote:

            From: LouRugani <x779@...>
            Subject: =CROSLEY CAR OWNERS CLUB= Re: new member with Gasporter
            To: Crosley@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, October 8, 2012, 7:21 PM

            --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, "Bob" <n6346m@...> wrote:

            "Hi everyone. I have recently purchased a nice Crosley Gasporter and knew absolutely nothing about them except that they existed and I wanted one. I will be using it for its intended purpose of refueling my 1943 and 1948 vintage airplanes. To start with I am looking for any operator's manuals, parts manuals or any other literature pertaining to the Gasporter. I have already ordered parts and shop manuals for the Crosley truck platform so I am looking for stuff that pertains to the Gasporter portion of the vehicle. I would also like to hear from any other Gasporter owners so we can compare notes. Thanks."
            Bob Picard
            Anchor Point, Alaska
            907-235-2398
            ==================
            Great find, Bob, and congratulations, especially for pressing the Gasporter into its original intent! Our Paul Gorrell has a restored Gasporter, and we have Gaspoerter literature in our Photos collection.

            There was a scandal at the time with the firm that built the Gasporters, having to do with one of the Navy's most closely guarded secrets, a project that had priority over the atomic bomb during the war, considered so secret that some parts are still classified. The Navy entrusted this vital project with its complex engineering and construction to the firm that built the Crosley Gasporters: Engineering Research Associates of St. Paul, Minn. Founded during World War II, the Navy officers who had made the deal later turned up as highly salaried vice presidents of the company. E. R. C. was originally called Northwest Aeronautic Corporation, and had gotten an "unfavorable" report by Booz, Allen and Hamilton, of Washington. D. C., management consultants. Despite this, it was reported that at least twelve established companies were better qualified to do that work, but still the Navy awarded its secret contract, No. 28176, to E. R.A. in February, 1946. The Navy officers who arranged for E. R. A. to get this juicy contract were Capt. Ralph Meader, wartime commander of the Navy Computing Machine Laboratory at Dayton, Ohio; Capt. Howard Engstrom, former Itr-search Director for Naval Communications; and Comdr. William C. Norris of the same office. All three later joined E. R. A. as vice presidents. Meader soon sold out his interest In E.R.A. for $30.000. However, his contract contained a mysterious clause that he could not bring charges against the company after his resignation. Neither Meader nor E. R. A.'s attorney James Clifford could explain what E. R. A. had to hide that such a clause should be inserted.

            More Gasporter research to come. Can you send some photos?

            Lou Rugani, co-moderator, CCOC



            ------------------------------------

               ~ Esse quam videre ~


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          • Robert Kirk
            Lou, Excellent research on the team behind the Gasporter...KUDOS! Regards, Robert Kirkwww.kirks-auto.com  Lou, Excellent research on the team behind the
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 10, 2012
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              Lou,
              Excellent research on the team behind the Gasporter...KUDOS!


              Regards,
              Robert Kirk
               

            • LouRugani
              Bob, here s more from our CCOC files on the Gasporters, and big thanks to Michael Banks as always for the Gasporter news article. For anything else you may
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 19, 2012
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                Bob, here's more from our CCOC files on the Gasporters, and big thanks to Michael Banks as always for the Gasporter news article. For anything else you may need, just ask.

                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/277693389/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc

                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/2047170465/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc

                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/1747416515/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc

                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/1281774631/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc
                ====================

                --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, Bob Picard <n6346m@...> wrote:
                >
                > Lou,
                > Thanks for your posting. I don't have ant pictures to post yet I should have some soon. I just got it running after many years of sitting idle outside. It runs pretty good and I have some issues with the brakes that need to be resolved. I looked inside the tank and it looks amazingly good for its age. As expected, there is some gunk and rust at the bottom but no scale or bad spots. It will clean up nicely. What I really need now is an owner's manual and a parts manual for the gasporter part. I was able to get manuals for the Crosley truck part of it already.
                >
                > Bob Picard
                > Anchor Point, Alaska
                >
                > --- On Mon, 10/8/12, LouRugani <x779@...> wrote:
                >
                > From: LouRugani <x779@...>
                > Subject: =CROSLEY CAR OWNERS CLUB= Re: new member with Gasporter
                > To: Crosley@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Monday, October 8, 2012, 7:21 PM
                >
                > --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, "Bob" <n6346m@> wrote:
                >
                > "Hi everyone. I have recently purchased a nice Crosley Gasporter and knew absolutely nothing about them except that they existed and I wanted one. I will be using it for its intended purpose of refueling my 1943 and 1948 vintage airplanes. To start with I am looking for any operator's manuals, parts manuals or any other literature pertaining to the Gasporter. I have already ordered parts and shop manuals for the Crosley truck platform so I am looking for stuff that pertains to the Gasporter portion of the vehicle. I would also like to hear from any other Gasporter owners so we can compare notes. Thanks."
                > Bob Picard
                > Anchor Point, Alaska
                > 907-235-2398
                > ==================
                > Great find, Bob, and congratulations, especially for pressing the Gasporter into its original intent! Our Paul Gorrell has a restored Gasporter, and we have Gaspoerter literature in our Photos collection.
                >
                > There was a scandal at the time with the firm that built the Gasporters, having to do with one of the Navy's most closely guarded secrets, a project that had priority over the atomic bomb during the war, considered so secret that some parts are still classified. The Navy entrusted this vital project with its complex engineering and construction to the firm that built the Crosley Gasporters: Engineering Research Associates of St. Paul, Minn. Founded during World War II, the Navy officers who had made the deal later turned up as highly salaried vice presidents of the company. E. R. C. was originally called Northwest Aeronautic Corporation, and had gotten an "unfavorable" report by Booz, Allen and Hamilton, of Washington. D. C., management consultants. Despite this, it was reported that at least twelve established companies were better qualified to do that work, but still the Navy awarded its secret contract, No. 28176, to E. R.A. in February, 1946. The Navy officers who arranged for E. R. A. to get this juicy contract were Capt. Ralph Meader, wartime commander of the Navy Computing Machine Laboratory at Dayton, Ohio; Capt. Howard Engstrom, former Itr-search Director for Naval Communications; and Comdr. William C. Norris of the same office. All three later joined E. R. A. as vice presidents. Meader soon sold out his interest In E.R.A. for $30.000. However, his contract contained a mysterious clause that he could not bring charges against the company after his resignation. Neither Meader nor E. R. A.'s attorney James Clifford could explain what E. R. A. had to hide that such a clause should be inserted.
                >
                > More Gasporter research to come. Can you send some photos?
                >
                > Lou Rugani, co-moderator, CCOC
              • Bob Picard
                Here are a couple of pictures of my gasporter. Bob ... From: LouRugani Subject: =CROSLEY CAR OWNERS CLUB= Re: new member with Gasporter To:
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 20, 2012
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                  Here are a couple of pictures of my gasporter.

                  Bob

                  --- On Fri, 10/19/12, LouRugani <x779@...> wrote:

                  From: LouRugani <x779@...>
                  Subject: =CROSLEY CAR OWNERS CLUB= Re: new member with Gasporter
                  To: Crosley@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, October 19, 2012, 6:43 PM

                  Bob, here's more from our CCOC files on the Gasporters, and big thanks to Michael Banks as always for the Gasporter news article. For anything else you may need, just ask.

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/277693389/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/2047170465/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/1747416515/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/1281774631/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc
                  ====================

                  --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, Bob Picard <n6346m@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Lou,
                  > Thanks for your posting. I don't have ant pictures to post yet I should have some soon. I just got it running after many years of sitting idle outside. It runs pretty good and I have some issues with the brakes that need to be resolved. I looked inside the tank and it looks amazingly good for its age. As expected, there is some gunk and rust at the bottom but no scale or bad spots. It will clean up nicely. What I really need now is an owner's manual and a parts manual for the gasporter part. I was able to get manuals for the Crosley truck part of it already.
                  >
                  > Bob Picard
                  > Anchor Point, Alaska
                  >
                  > --- On Mon, 10/8/12, LouRugani <x779@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > From: LouRugani <x779@...>
                  > Subject: =CROSLEY CAR OWNERS CLUB= Re: new member with Gasporter
                  > To: Crosley@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Monday, October 8, 2012, 7:21 PM
                  >
                  > --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, "Bob" <n6346m@> wrote:
                  >
                  > "Hi everyone. I have recently purchased a nice Crosley Gasporter and knew absolutely nothing about them except that they existed and I wanted one. I will be using it for its intended purpose of refueling my 1943 and 1948 vintage airplanes. To start with I am looking for any operator's manuals, parts manuals or any other literature pertaining to the Gasporter. I have already ordered parts and shop manuals for the Crosley truck platform so I am looking for stuff that pertains to the Gasporter portion of the vehicle. I would also like to hear from any other Gasporter owners so we can compare notes. Thanks."
                  >  Bob Picard
                  >  Anchor Point, Alaska
                  >  907-235-2398
                  > ==================
                  > Great find, Bob, and congratulations, especially for pressing the Gasporter into its original intent! Our Paul Gorrell has a restored Gasporter, and we have Gaspoerter literature in our Photos collection.
                  >
                  > There was a scandal at the time with the firm that built the Gasporters, having to do with one of the Navy's most closely guarded secrets, a project that had priority over the atomic bomb during the war, considered so secret that some parts are still classified. The Navy entrusted this vital project with its complex engineering and construction to the firm that built the Crosley Gasporters: Engineering Research Associates of St. Paul, Minn. Founded during World War II, the Navy officers who had made the deal later turned up as highly salaried vice presidents of the company. E. R. C. was originally called Northwest Aeronautic Corporation, and had gotten an "unfavorable" report by Booz, Allen and Hamilton, of Washington. D. C., management consultants. Despite this, it was reported that at least twelve established companies were better qualified to do that work, but still the Navy awarded its secret contract, No. 28176, to E. R.A. in February, 1946. The Navy officers who arranged for E. R. A. to get this juicy contract were Capt. Ralph Meader, wartime commander of the Navy Computing Machine Laboratory at Dayton, Ohio; Capt. Howard Engstrom, former Itr-search Director for Naval Communications; and Comdr. William C. Norris of the same office. All three later joined E. R. A. as vice presidents. Meader soon sold out his interest In E.R.A. for $30.000. However, his contract contained a mysterious clause that he could not bring charges against the company after his resignation. Neither Meader nor E. R. A.'s attorney James Clifford could explain what E. R. A. had to hide that such a clause should be inserted.
                  >
                  > More Gasporter research to come. Can you send some photos?
                  >
                  > Lou Rugani, co-moderator, CCOC




                  ------------------------------------

                     ~ Esse quam videre ~


                  Post your Crosley chat, stories, questions/answers and memories now at www.onelist.com/group/Crosley/post

                  Visit our CCOC Store: www.cafepress.com/CrosleyClub 
                  CCOC websites:
                  <www.onelist.com/group/Crosley>
                  <www.onelist.com/group/CrosleyService>

                  The CCOC - A Fine Club.
                  You see us everywhere.
                  Organized 1952 - reorganized 2006.Yahoo! Groups Links

                  <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/

                  <*> Your email settings:
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                  <*> To change settings online go to:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/join
                      (Yahoo! ID required)

                  <*> To change settings via email:
                      Crosley-digest@yahoogroups.com
                      Crosley-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

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                      Crosley-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

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                • Bob Picard
                  Duh! I forgot to attach the pictures. Here they are. Bob ... From: Bob Picard Subject: Re: =CROSLEY CAR OWNERS CLUB= Re: new member with
                  Message 8 of 9 , Oct 20, 2012
                  View Source
                  Duh! I forgot to attach the pictures. Here they are.
                  Bob

                  --- On Sat, 10/20/12, Bob Picard <n6346m@...> wrote:

                  From: Bob Picard <n6346m@...>
                  Subject: Re: =CROSLEY CAR OWNERS CLUB= Re: new member with Gasporter
                  To: Crosley@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Saturday, October 20, 2012, 8:09 PM



                  Here are a couple of pictures of my gasporter.

                  Bob

                  --- On Fri, 10/19/12, LouRugani <x779@...> wrote:

                  From: LouRugani <x779@...>
                  Subject: =CROSLEY CAR OWNERS CLUB= Re: new member with Gasporter
                  To: Crosley@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, October 19, 2012, 6:43 PM

                  Bob, here's more from our CCOC files on the Gasporters, and big thanks to Michael Banks as always for the Gasporter news article. For anything else you may need, just ask.

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/277693389/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/2047170465/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/1747416515/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc

                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crosley/photos/album/1021861026/pic/1281774631/view?picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=81&dir=asc
                  ====================

                  --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, Bob Picard <n6346m@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Lou,
                  > Thanks for your posting. I don't have ant pictures to post yet I should have some soon. I just got it running after many years of sitting idle outside. It runs pretty good and I have some issues with the brakes that need to be resolved. I looked inside the tank and it looks amazingly good for its age. As expected, there is some gunk and rust at the bottom but no scale or bad spots. It will clean up nicely. What I really need now is an owner's manual and a parts manual for the gasporter part. I was able to get manuals for the Crosley truck part of it already.
                  >
                  > Bob Picard
                  > Anchor Point, Alaska
                  >
                  > --- On Mon, 10/8/12, LouRugani <x779@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > From: LouRugani <x779@...>
                  > Subject: =CROSLEY CAR OWNERS CLUB= Re: new member with Gasporter
                  > To: Crosley@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Monday, October 8, 2012, 7:21 PM
                  >
                  > --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, "Bob" <n6346m@> wrote:
                  >
                  > "Hi everyone. I have recently purchased a nice Crosley Gasporter and knew absolutely nothing about them except that they existed and I wanted one. I will be using it for its intended purpose of refueling my 1943 and 1948 vintage airplanes. To start with I am looking for any operator's manuals, parts manuals or any other literature pertaining to the Gasporter. I have already ordered parts and shop manuals for the Crosley truck platform so I am looking for stuff that pertains to the Gasporter portion of the vehicle. I would also like to hear from any other Gasporter owners so we can compare notes. Thanks."
                  >  Bob Picard
                  >  Anchor Point, Alaska
                  >  907-235-2398
                  > ==================
                  > Great find, Bob, and congratulations, especially for pressing the Gasporter into its original intent! Our Paul Gorrell has a restored Gasporter, and we have Gaspoerter literature in our Photos collection.
                  >
                  > There was a scandal at the time with the firm that built the Gasporters, having to do with one of the Navy's most closely guarded secrets, a project that had priority over the atomic bomb during the war, considered so secret that some parts are still classified. The Navy entrusted this vital project with its complex engineering and construction to the firm that built the Crosley Gasporters: Engineering Research Associates of St. Paul, Minn. Founded during World War II, the Navy officers who had made the deal later turned up as highly salaried vice presidents of the company. E. R. C. was originally called Northwest Aeronautic Corporation, and had gotten an "unfavorable" report by Booz, Allen and Hamilton, of Washington. D. C., management consultants. Despite this, it was reported that at least twelve established companies were better qualified to do that work, but still the Navy awarded its secret contract, No. 28176, to E. R.A. in February, 1946. The Navy officers who arranged for E. R. A. to get this juicy contract were Capt. Ralph Meader, wartime commander of the Navy Computing Machine Laboratory at Dayton, Ohio; Capt. Howard Engstrom, former Itr-search Director for Naval Communications; and Comdr. William C. Norris of the same office. All three later joined E. R. A. as vice presidents. Meader soon sold out his interest In E.R.A. for $30.000. However, his contract contained a mysterious clause that he could not bring charges against the company after his resignation. Neither Meader nor E. R. A.'s attorney James Clifford could explain what E. R. A. had to hide that such a clause should be inserted.
                  >
                  > More Gasporter research to come. Can you send some photos?
                  >
                  > Lou Rugani, co-moderator, CCOC




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