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Crosley Parkway Delivery - Small and Cheap with Lots of Class (1)

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  • mrcooby
    by Tom Brownell ======================== (Reprinted from Old Cars Weekly- 9/29/94) Powel Crosley, Jr. built pint-sized cars because he believed that American
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 6, 2006
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      by Tom Brownell
      ========================
      (Reprinted from Old
      Cars Weekly- 9/29/94)

      Powel Crosley, Jr.
      built pint-sized cars
      because he believed
      that American
      manufacturers were
      forcing their customers
      to buy more automobile
      than they needed. "Have
      you ever stopped to
      think how ridiculous it
      is that one to four
      people require a ton-
      and-a-half motorcar to
      carry them a mile or so
      to a picture show?", he
      once asked.

      In a lot of ways,
      small size - not only
      for passenger cars but
      also for delivery
      vehicles - made sense.
      Some of our readers
      will remember a time
      when many retail
      businesses,
      neighborhood grocers in
      particular, delivered
      goods free of charge to
      their customers'
      homes.

      Which made more sense,
      a grocery or floral
      shop sending an armful
      of packages to a
      customer in a fullsized
      truck, or in a half-
      sized Crosley?

      To Powel Crosley, Jr,
      the choice was clear.
      ========================

      Next: A "miniature town
      car".
    • mrcooby
      by Tom Brownell =========================== (Reprinted from Old Cars Weekly- 9/29/94) A man of many interests, Powel Crosley, Jr. found special fascination in
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 7, 2006
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        by Tom Brownell
        ===========================
        (Reprinted from Old
        Cars Weekly- 9/29/94)

        A man of many interests,
        Powel Crosley, Jr. found
        special fascination in the
        automobile. While still a
        teenager he attempted to
        build an electric car and
        a few years later tried
        again with the Marathon, a
        small car to be powered by
        a six-cylinder engine.

        Finally, having built a
        fortune in radios and
        refrigerators, Crosley set
        out to manufacture the
        smallest vehicles built in
        America. That first
        Crosley car, introduced in
        1939, was a tiny
        convertible; then, in
        1940, the Crosley line
        expanded to include
        several car and commercial
        models, including the
        Parkway Delivery.
        Crosley styled the Parkway
        Delivery to resemble a
        miniature town car, making
        it a vehicle any retail
        business could operate
        with pride and use to
        deliver modest packages
        even in the swankiest
        neighborhoods.
        ===========================

        Next: Cannon Ball Baker's
        cross-country tour.
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