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From the Logansport Pharos-Tribune, August 4, 2005:

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  • LouRugani
    BUS TURNED RV Twelve Mile man converts former transit bus into a motor home By DEB SAINE Logansport Pharos-Tribune staff writer TWELVE MILE — Across the
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 28, 2010
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      BUS TURNED RV
      Twelve Mile man converts former transit bus into a motor home
      By DEB SAINE
      Logansport Pharos-Tribune staff writer

      TWELVE MILE — Across the street and not far from the Twelve Mile Community Building is a pole barn big enough to hold a transit bus.
      As a matter of fact, there's a big blue, 40-foot bus in there this
      very minute.
      Once used for public transportation in New Jersey, the bus is being converted into a motor home of sorts by Butch Williams, his wife, Fonda, other family members and friends. He said it's "far from" completion.
      The couple will use the bus for camping as well as annual visits to two or three national meets for Crosley automobile enthusiasts.
      Butch is known by some as "the king of Crosley motors" because of his ability to make replacement parts for the compact car, manufactured in Richmond and Marion between 1939 and 1952, according to Wikipedia.com.
      Also according to the site, the first Crosley, a two-door convertible,
      was shown at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The cost of the car was $250.
      "During World War II, the Crosley became attractive because of gasoline rationing and the good mileage (50 miles/gallon) ... the Crosley Hot Shot was the first post-war sport car produced in the US., and the first to have disc brakes," according to Wikipedia.
      Sales peaked at 24,871 in 1948. But four years later, only 1,522 Crosleys were sold, so production ceased in 1952. The plant was sold to General Tire and Rubber Company.
      Butch, born in Iowa and raised in Gary, said he'd never heard of
      Crosley Motors until he moved here. He was introduced to the cars by Clarence Kapraun, a teacher, who built a business around reproducing replacement parts.
      When Kapraun wanted out, Butch took it over. But he's not the only one making the replacement parts. Fonda, does, too. She's just not sure that's something that should be made public because "guys probably don't want to know a woman is making the parts."

      (Deb Saine may be contacted by calling (574) 732-5144 or via e-mail
      at deb.saiiie@phamstribune.)
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