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Alcohol and fuel pumps.

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  • LouRugani
    I had two major fuel-pump failures this month, one in my 47 CC Sport Convertible, and both pumps had been recently rebuilt. I blame ethanol-laced fuel. Under
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 16, 2010
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      I had two major fuel-pump failures this month, one in my '47 CC Sport Convertible, and both pumps had been recently rebuilt. I blame ethanol-laced fuel.

      Under pressure from ethanol producers to raise the ethanol content in gasoline, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) could issue a decision later this month allowing the use of 15$ ethanol gasoline in late-model cars.

      It could permit the use in older cars at a later date.

      There are major concerns that the additional content will harm automobiles of all ages.

      Ask President Obama to stop the EPA from raising the Ethanol content in gasoline from today's 10 percent (E10) to 15 percent (E15) – a 50 percent increase.

      The EPA is under political pressure from corporate ethanol supporters to raise the rates in order to boost grain-alcohol sales. However, ethanol causes our engines to burn hotter - not a good thing as it could lead to premature engine and equipment failure - and ethanol increases water formation in the fuel system, especially when the vehicle sits over a period of time, as ours do. Formic acid is created which corrodes metals, plastics and rubber, leading to engine/parts failures and safety hazards such as fuel leaks, something I experienced just yesterday in a recently-rebuilt pump (not in a Crosley).

      If the EPA approves E15, it will state that the increased ethanol is only for recent model cars. However, once a new fuel mix enters the gasoline supply system, it will inevitably end up in the wrong engines.

      Gasoline without any ethanol may simply disappear from the marketplace for millions of Americans with older cars or special interest collector and historic vehicles. E10 has already made this a reality in many areas of the country.

      The EPA should wait until all of the scientific research is complete. There is no need for a rush to judgment.

      Please contact President Obama at http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact

      Please e-mail a copy of your letter to Steve McDonald at stevem@....
    • Richard Williams
      I have a 48 Crosley Sta. Wgn. (NELLIE) and it has a Carter carb. with the accelerator. If I don t start her every week or two at least, the acclerator jet
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 16, 2010
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        I have a 48 Crosley Sta. Wgn. (NELLIE) and it has a Carter carb. with the accelerator. If I don't start her every week or two at least, the acclerator jet stops up. I have to remove the plug and with a pin unplug the hole or it won't work right. Has anyone else had this problem. I blame it on the gas we are using now.

        --- On Thu, 9/16/10, LouRugani <x779@...> wrote:

        From: LouRugani <x779@...>
        Subject: =CROSLEY= Alcohol and fuel pumps.
        To: crosley@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, September 16, 2010, 9:04 AM

         
        I had two major fuel-pump failures this month, one in my '47 CC Sport Convertible, and both pumps had been recently rebuilt. I blame ethanol-laced fuel.

        Under pressure from ethanol producers to raise the ethanol content in gasoline, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) could issue a decision later this month allowing the use of 15$ ethanol gasoline in late-model cars.

        It could permit the use in older cars at a later date.

        There are major concerns that the additional content will harm automobiles of all ages.

        Ask President Obama to stop the EPA from raising the Ethanol content in gasoline from today's 10 percent (E10) to 15 percent (E15) – a 50 percent increase.

        The EPA is under political pressure from corporate ethanol supporters to raise the rates in order to boost grain-alcohol sales. However, ethanol causes our engines to burn hotter - not a good thing as it could lead to premature engine and equipment failure - and ethanol increases water formation in the fuel system, especially when the vehicle sits over a period of time, as ours do. Formic acid is created which corrodes metals, plastics and rubber, leading to engine/parts failures and safety hazards such as fuel leaks, something I experienced just yesterday in a recently-rebuilt pump (not in a Crosley).

        If the EPA approves E15, it will state that the increased ethanol is only for recent model cars. However, once a new fuel mix enters the gasoline supply system, it will inevitably end up in the wrong engines.

        Gasoline without any ethanol may simply disappear from the marketplace for millions of Americans with older cars or special interest collector and historic vehicles. E10 has already made this a reality in many areas of the country.

        The EPA should wait until all of the scientific research is complete. There is no need for a rush to judgment.

        Please contact President Obama at http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact

        Please e-mail a copy of your letter to Steve McDonald at stevem@....



      • Robert Kirk
        Lou I too can attest to the evils of alcohol blends in vintage autos.  It can be most harmful to any rubber bits in the fuel system, pump diaphragms
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 16, 2010
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          Lou
          I too can attest to the evils of alcohol blends in vintage autos.  It can be most harmful to any rubber bits in the fuel system, pump diaphragms especially as they are very thin and operate by stretching.  Alcohol tends to rob the elasticity rather rapidly. 
           
          Living  in Iowa E 15 and even E85 are making inroads to fuel stations.  It would appear some states are lost but here, it is still possible to find stations who pump 100% dino fuels.  It takes a little time to source them but its well worth it.  Amaco used sell pure gasoline but I think they now be part of BP...neither it nor Texaco are in my area anylonger.  Some independents such as Sunoco affliates have pure gasoline albeit very high octane. 
           
          Thanks for the links, the collector car community needs to make the politicians aware.  As a whole, we would be a strong lobbying arm. 
           
          FWIW, the problems with alcohol effect all engines of old, lawn mowers, marine motors, etc.  Even the new mowers have parts adversely affected by alcohol blends so I am told by a mechanic who makes his living serviceing box store engine warrenties...

          Regards,
          Robert Kirk
           


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