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Re: [Crosley] Crystal Lake

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  • Robert Kirk
    The Crystal Lake micro show was a hands on winner!!! Lou and I finally met up and it was Paul Gorrell who pointed Lou out to me.....standing out in the middle
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 14, 2006
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      The Crystal Lake micro show was a hands on winner!!!  Lou and I finally met up and it was Paul Gorrell who pointed Lou out to me.....standing out in the middle of everything literally tooting his horn!!  This show was MORE than just a static display.  The real hit were the owners who volunteered to take anyone for a free ride in their little cars.  Lou was not outdone on this occasion.  A very rare Eishellmann (sp?) about the size of a child's pedal car was Lou's vehicle of choice....daring to run the circuit with children literally hanging out the side,he was hands down the winner of the children pick of the day.  There were cars of every ilk and measure to behold...several antiques and even a wooden car.  3/4 sized Austin American, Paul's prototype AND he had his one of only 5 made Waukeshaw engined motorcycle on display.  He suggests the Army went with larger Harley in WWII because they didn't like the electic starter!?!?!?!   GO figure!!! 
      The venue was a hidden treat as the owner of the facility is also a car nut (American mostly BUT cherry originals are his obsession) over 100 vehicles inside the climate controled former factory.  It was sort of like a Totsie Pop....all the candy on the outside and the "treat" on the inside!  Anyway the micro car meet was a real success and I only wish I had taken my pick up or HotShot.......
       
      Next up was the 100th anniversary at Waukeshaw Engine in Waukeshaw County in Waukeshaw Wisconsin.  These folks still make engines....I saw a V 18 easily larger than a Crosley.  The still mostly make stationary engines and now days specialize in propane powered power plants.  Paul has his prototype and motorcyle on display along with an also rare marine engine and powered snow sled.  Lou was on hand with his Liberty and a chap from Cinncinatti who owns a beautiful Sedan given by Powell to Powell's brother.  Totally restored it is akin to a car I am currently chaseing down.  There were several tractors on display...all Waukeshaw powered and an Allis Chalmers propane fork truck also powered by the WI factory.  This was of considerable interest to me as I worked at the AC fork truck factory in Harvey ILL before they moved and were bought by Fiat.  At the time the engine factory was a couple blocks away so I had no idea they ever outsourced their motors....AC fork trucks were considered the top of the line in the 70s and prior for those who don't know. 
       
      In between the Crystal Lake show and WI celebration, I was able to pick up a 1950 station wagon with a Bearcat motor and twin carbs atop a Braje intake.  I know have a 1949 (suspected prototype) 1950 and 1951 station wagons.  A 47 round side pick up (still seeking a title and or vin plate) and my sleeper Hot Shot also with bear cat...that's what makes it a sleeper!
       
      I tracked it down recently in California by a fellow who got the motor from noted engine builder Barry Seel.  Seems he is moving to be closer to work and downsizing his collection.  Nicely restored in BRIGHT yellow it came complete with doors but alas is missing its top and bows....not appropriate for CA so the owner tells me.  I dropped my wife off in Vail CO and after some trouble with my diesel Suburban in the altitude, I made off cross county for Salt Lake Utah then I 180 on to San Francisco and back to Cheyenne WY then south to fetch my wife.  I drove 36 hours straight thru to Frisco and back into Nevada where I found a motel in a small town about 50 miles east of Reno.  I checked in at 8:30 and the clerk asked if I'd had a rought night!  I told him I had been driving a while and ultimately crashed for 22 hours wakeing only to eat the remove the windshield from the Hot Shot....off again at 6:30 the next morning.  Slipped down from Wyoming into Colorado Springs where I stopped for a coke and sundae at a local McDonalds at about 2am.  Someone in the drive thru had a heart attack (I won't even explore the amplitude for commentary!) and the guy at the "pick up window" denied me because I was a walk up and might rob him.....down customer in car blocking lane, ER rescue and attendents attending, TWO squad cars which had preceeded me at the entrance and my Suburban with 20 trailor and HS aboard around the corner in his lot!  I told him I promised not to rob him and that doing so would seem stupid at the particular moment and distance from the commotion and asked to speak to his manager.  Ultimately i was served and proceed to the fromt lot where two young ladies were "attempting" to change their flat tire.  Scissors jack with the solid but crankable handle factory bent to accormade ease of use.  They had some how threaded the handle thru the jack about half way up instead of the little U shape on the end appropriate to proper useage!  They had an adjustable wrench to use on the deep set lug nuts....they seem appreciative but weren't taking notes of my efforts and explanations to them. 
      Anyway dropped the car and trailor off in Denver, went on to Vail and returned for the pair.  Stopped in Fort Morgan Colorado for my 51 wagon sitting for 20 years.  Owner fork lifted it like threading a needle on the back of the trailor and, after lashing it down, we drove the 800 miles home with two Crosleys.  Landed about a 10 day ago in time to get off loaded and "well slept" for the two events this past weekend and as I mentioned earlier, ANOTHER Crosley! 
       
      My wife thinks I am nuts!  I suspect a grain of truth in that!!!
       
      Happy Crosleying
      Robert Kirk
       
      PS looking for HotShot top bows and have choice of CD wagons to trade for a PreWar!
       


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