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Bantam Plane

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  • Jim Plank
    Could I have the Anniversary Reminder, Bantam Plane Ready For Market, e-mailed back to me? Thanks Jim
    Message 1 of 2 , May 20, 2010
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      Could I have the Anniversary Reminder, Bantam Plane Ready For Market, e-mailed back to me? Thanks Jim

    • LouRugani
      Jim Plank CCOC wrote: Could I have the Anniversary Reminder, Bantam Plane Ready For Market, e-mailed back to me? ==================
      Message 2 of 2 , May 21, 2010
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        Jim Plank CCOC <jpcarcapsules@...> wrote:

        "Could I have the Anniversary Reminder, Bantam Plane Ready For Market, e-mailed back to me?"
        ==================
        Crosley Car Owners Club (CCOC)

        (Joplin Globe, Tuesday, May 11, 1948) BANTAM PLANE READY FOR MARKET
        Date: Tuesday May 11, 2010

        This event repeats every year.
        Anniversary Location: Wichita, Kansas.

        400-Pound Craft Will Fly Cross-Country on $12 Worth of Gasoline, Producer Claims.

        Wichita, Kan., May 10.—(A/P)—
        The bantam of airplanes warmed up today for its market take-off amid talk by its producer that it can fly cross-country on $12 even in these days of high-priced gasoline.

        The M-18, as it is called, is only 18 feet long with a 27-foot wingspread and tips the scale at a scant 450 pounds — with room for a 250-pound load.

        Its designer, Chief Engineer Al Mooney of the Mooney Aircraft Company here, says it can be produced for half the cost of present light planes and eventually his company hopes to sell it for $1,500.

        59-Pound Engine.

        Mooney — who has designed or improved 35 different planes in the last 18 years — claims his aerial flivver's eight-gallon tank gives it a six-hour flying range of around 400 miles. The tiny one-seater is built of metal from the nose to behind the pilot's seat and of wood from there to the tail. It is powered by a 59-pound Cobra engine, produced by Crosley Motors, Inc. Mooney insists the plane can climb to 16,000 feet.

        Powel Crosley, Jr., president of Crosley Motors, Inc., is scheduled to take another look at the tiny air mite here tomorrow. He recently watched Mooney put it through its paces at Crosley's private airfield near Cincinnati.
        "I've already seen enough," Crosley said, "to convince me Mooney has met the requirements of sound, efficient and low-priced aircraft with his aerial counterpart of the lightweight, low-priced car."
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