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From John P. Bacon in Florida, age 89:

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  • LouRugani
    I was a Nash dealer in Waycross, Ga., in 1946-48 and I read an ad in the Automotive News seeking dealers for the Crosley car. I ordered two and a week or so
    Message 1 of 1 , May 11, 2010
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      I was a Nash dealer in Waycross, Ga., in 1946-48 and I read an ad in the Automotive News seeking dealers for the Crosley car. I ordered two and a week or so later a Railway Express truck delivered three boxes. One had the engine, the other two the left and right sides. My service manager had to put the car together and I sold it to an unsuspecting young employee of the Waycross Journal-Herald. A few days later the second car arrived in the same condition and I could not sell it for love or money, but it was handy for me to pick up my caddy when I played golf at the Okefenokee Golf Club. I was notified by the Defense Department that I would be recalled to active duty in October 1948, so I took the car to the auction facility in Valdosta, Ga. Prior to going through the auction, a dealer from Daytona Beach bought the Crosley, and told me that he would put oversize tires on the car and sell it as a beach buggy. I was so glad to get rid of the cracker box that I did not realize it was the beginning of a new industry. During World War II, Crosley built the CT-3 Pup, which was a lightweight jeep-type vehicle capable of being transported by the C-47 aircraft. Only six Pups made it overseas after undergoing tests at Fort Benning, Ga. Underpowered by an anemic 13-horsepower engine, the Pup proved inadequate in the field. The Army quickly scrapped the project, leaving only a few Crosleys to posterity. One of the seven known to exist today is on display at the Mighty 8th Air Force Museum in Savannah, Ga.
      (We have the photo posted.)
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