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Re: Engine Swaps

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  • kirkbrit
    Your observation is spot on IMHO. The engine is argueably the strongest item in the equation. And as Peter notes any Marine engine will require very specific
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 16, 2009
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      Your observation is spot on IMHO. The engine is argueably the strongest item in the equation. And as Peter notes any Marine engine will require very specific and professional re working at a cost of several thousand $s as they are mostly all horizontal rather than verticle in format.


      --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, "cutworm1959" <cutworm1959@...> wrote:
      >
      > The engine is the whole reason the car was built. If Powel did not discover the Cobra I doubt we would have the hobby we love. Folks in the fiftys kept the engine and threw the car away. Now it seems trends are reverseing. In my opinion it stops being a Crosley when it has the heart of the car removed just to be different. Im kinda wierd that way. Cutworm
      >
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      > --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Berard" <berard_m@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello Bart,
      > > There are numerous engines that can be made to fit from the Crosley family, but I know of only one that is a shoe in. Anyone in the group correct me if I err. The engines that were used in military applications such as generator/power plants are the easiest to convert because they have the proper flange at the rear of the crankshaft to mount the standard automotive flywheel.
      > >
      > > "Some assembly required".
      > >
      > > As best as I can tell, none of the outboards are compatible in their original state.
      > > I'd like to know, if anyone knows, any other applications that had the proper flywheel flange, including the many inboard marine applications.
      > > The pan must be changed, or modified to fit a car. You may opt to use the most common ignition system that is found on the engines, an aircraft type magneto, or install the distributor from a car. (requires the removal of the pan). I have done it both ways successfully on two different cars.
      > > The Bearcat and other outboard boat engines will require major modifications to suit a car. these must be done by machinist with experience in this task, or, you will most certainly have heart breaks. We have among our midst, some of the best. And, they are dedicated to Crosleys.
      > >
      > > Now, can anyone else educate us all as to if I'm correct, or add further info?
      > > Matter of fact, I think it would help to have this exchange information available to our Crosley folks. I would try to avoid the earlier engines due to poor crankshaft quality.
      > > I'd be interested in acquiring a 'Big Engine' engine or two that would not require the flywheel mods. Who knows how crazy I might become when it comes to owning these cars................pete
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: crosley8
      > > To: Crosley@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Sunday, September 13, 2009 3:11 PM
      > > Subject: =CROSLEY= Engine Swaps
      > >
      > >
      > > New to this site. Was wondering if anyone had any info on engine swaps for these little Crosleys.Other than the bearcat conversion.Any info or leads would be greatly appreciated.Not trying to ruffle any purists feathers just asking
      > > Thanks
      > > Bart
      > >
      >
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