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Old versus new.

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  • mrcooby
    The other day I was reading an article in a classic car magazine about why the author likes the old cars of the 50 s and 60 s better than today s cars. The
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 27, 2009
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      The other day I was reading an article in a classic car magazine about why the author likes the old cars of the 50's and 60's better than today's cars. The author grew up in the 50's and may be a little biased to those cars of his generation. This got me thinking. I know this; I had the most fun in the old cars. But, does that mean that the newer cars are better than the old ones?
      My two cents: it's not the simplicity that we miss from yesteryear, it's the styling, the flash, the youth that we miss. So, if you have an all original classic, leave it alone. Buy the exact car that is beaten down and restore it so you can enjoy the best of both worlds.
    • fred
      Many of us look at the past and wish that we had one of those old pieces of iron to enjoy. Yet they forget the features that these vintage toys did not have.
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 28, 2009
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        Many of us look at the past and wish that we had one
        of those old pieces of iron to enjoy. Yet they forget
        the features that these vintage toys did not have.
        How many of us out there would trade the that easy
        shifting of an automatic transmission for a straight
        shift transmission? How about head lights that did
        have no more than a single candle power. Talk about
        flat tires and few of us would like to live the days
        when cars where limited to just city driving.

        --- In Crosley@yahoogroups.com, "mrcooby" <x779@...> wrote:
        >
        > The other day I was reading an article in a classic car magazine about why the author likes the old cars of the 50's and 60's better than today's cars. The author grew up in the 50's and may be a little biased to those cars of his generation. This got me thinking. I know this; I had the most fun in the old cars. But, does that mean that the newer cars are better than the old ones?
        > My two cents: it's not the simplicity that we miss from yesteryear, it's the styling, the flash, the youth that we miss. So, if you have an all original classic, leave it alone. Buy the exact car that is beaten down and restore it so you can enjoy the best of both worlds.
        >
      • BOB ROSS
        I have been watching this thread and keep fighting with myself about giving my .02 cents. With the Crosleys, my father had one and as such I grew up with fond
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 29, 2009
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          I have been watching this thread and keep fighting with myself about giving my .02 cents.
           
          With the Crosleys, my father had one and as such I grew up with fond memories of them. Back then, I remember playing with the propeller on the front of the crosley and riding it thru the neighborhood and even getting to "drive it" (steer more appropriate, as my feet didnt even reach half way to the floor or pedals etc.)
           
          I am sure most of you notice that crosley ownership tends to restrict itself to a certain age group...Those of us with memories of them. As I grow older I am more and more convinced that the love of cars like the Crosleys will tend to die out as we do...
           
          As to modifying one or not it strikes me that while utilitarian in a lot of senses the Crosleys probably will have little in the way of appeal for the younger generation (unless grampa's grandson/granddaughter- you know the ones NOW out there spinning the propeller). As they grow into the caretaker position, I think that they will not be as concerned with "Purity" as much as convience. Can I take it to the corner grocery store to get that loaf of bread, or to brother Toms home 100 miles away.
           
          I feel very strongly that the collector cars, will tend to be like a funnel... Going from us and narrowing down as we pass untill very little interest in cars like the Crosleys, or the Model T's, or the Hillmans.
           
          I do think that the modified cars however will have some appeal to this younger generation.. Check out the price of "origional cars" compared to "modified cars". Sadly the modified cars are overwhelming the Origionals.. Why, because "I THINK" they are more of a convience car. I am afraid that these will be the cars that will maintain the enthusiasm. The modified car that the owner can climb in and join the superhighway and "cruise" along at 70 mph.. With the Air blowing cold, the Stereo blasting (too high in my opinion)..but I am old so what do I know??... Then again, I too, like the cold air conditioning...
           
          Origionality is a great thing, but I am afraid that if we take too hard a line against the "modified" versions than you are certainly sending a message that the group is not interested in perpetuating anything other than what origionally came from the factory. This in my opinion will certainly not bode well for bringing in the younger generation who will in time be the caretakers. Look at the split this has caused already..
           
          Is it a Crosley because it is painted a non factory color? How about if the bumper is turned upside down?? Is it a Crosley because it has a 4 speed transmission from an Austin Healey installed??  So why not be satisfied that there is an interest in keeping the breed alive and going..
          And enjoy the fact that your car is exactly what you want it to be and people tend to OOOH AND AAAHHH it as you show it or drive it.. Why then do some feel that a modified owner is not allowed to be exactly what they want theirs to be?? IT IS STILL A CROSLEY.  
           
          MY OPINION and sorry for the length.. I will get off my soap box now.
          Bob        
           
                              
        • tim foster
          Bob, I really enjoyed reading your thoughts!  thanks for posting.   While I m not convinced that the act of riding in modified crosleys will stir up all
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 29, 2009
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            Bob, I really enjoyed reading your thoughts!  thanks for posting.
             
            While I'm not convinced that the act of riding in modified crosleys will stir up all that much love among the next generation (hard to make a Crosley all that comfy at 70MPH) I certainly agree that SEEING them at all is what will keep people interested.  if people are modifying them and keeping them on the road, then that is, at least in some ways, good.
             
            case in point:  There is a beautiful low mile, very original cd sedan on ebay right now. The car has gone through several cycles and tends to top out (reserve not met) at about $6K... which, not-so-coincidentally is almost exactly what a friend of mine paid for a similar conditioned CD sedan a couple of years back.
             
            That's certainly not much to pay for such an original car, especially in light of the value of other US-made cars from 1951.  But, I'm not interested because I couldn't in good conscience drive it very often.  it's too nice, too original and too rare in that condition.  That car should go to a collector who wants to preserve it.
             
            Meaning, that that car probably won't be driving down the street, parked at the post office or supermarket or otherwise out in daily use where it could create interest in Crosleys among people who might never run into another one.  A modified car, say with upgraded transmission or- god forbid- engine (best part of a Crosley!) that can be driven anywhere, parked in front of the bar, or on the street will do more to raise awareness of Crosleys than any car in a museum- no matter how nice or rare.
             
            Am I excited about a sectioned '51 Crosley wagon with a Chevy 350 and an easter egg paint job?  Absolutely not.  And, it is inexcusable to chop up a clean original to create a custom when there are plenty of rust buckets that could be used for the purpose.  But, if it's out in the public eye, getting people to ask 'What's a Crosley?' or say 'THAT'S an American car?... cool!' then it is doing some good.
             
            my 2 cents..
             
            tim
             
             
             
             


            --- On Wed, 7/29/09, BOB ROSS <antiqbob@...> wrote:

            From: BOB ROSS <antiqbob@...>
            Subject: =CROSLEY= Re: Old versus new.
            To: Crosley@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 10:51 AM

             
            I have been watching this thread and keep fighting with myself about giving my .02 cents.
             
            With the Crosleys, my father had one and as such I grew up with fond memories of them. Back then, I remember playing with the propeller on the front of the crosley and riding it thru the neighborhood and even getting to "drive it" (steer more appropriate, as my feet didnt even reach half way to the floor or pedals etc.)
             
            I am sure most of you notice that crosley ownership tends to restrict itself to a certain age group...Those of us with memories of them. As I grow older I am more and more convinced that the love of cars like the Crosleys will tend to die out as we do...
             
            As to modifying one or not it strikes me that while utilitarian in a lot of senses the Crosleys probably will have little in the way of appeal for the younger generation (unless grampa's grandson/granddaugh ter- you know the ones NOW out there spinning the propeller). As they grow into the caretaker position, I think that they will not be as concerned with "Purity" as much as convience. Can I take it to the corner grocery store to get that loaf of bread, or to brother Toms home 100 miles away.
             
            I feel very strongly that the collector cars, will tend to be like a funnel... Going from us and narrowing down as we pass untill very little interest in cars like the Crosleys, or the Model T's, or the Hillmans.
             
            I do think that the modified cars however will have some appeal to this younger generation.. Check out the price of "origional cars" compared to "modified cars". Sadly the modified cars are overwhelming the Origionals.. Why, because "I THINK" they are more of a convience car. I am afraid that these will be the cars that will maintain the enthusiasm. The modified car that the owner can climb in and join the superhighway and "cruise" along at 70 mph.. With the Air blowing cold, the Stereo blasting (too high in my opinion)..but I am old so what do I know??... Then again, I too, like the cold air conditioning. ..
             
            Origionality is a great thing, but I am afraid that if we take too hard a line against the "modified" versions than you are certainly sending a message that the group is not interested in perpetuating anything other than what origionally came from the factory. This in my opinion will certainly not bode well for bringing in the younger generation who will in time be the caretakers. Look at the split this has caused already..
             
            Is it a Crosley because it is painted a non factory color? How about if the bumper is turned upside down?? Is it a Crosley because it has a 4 speed transmission from an Austin Healey installed??  So why not be satisfied that there is an interest in keeping the breed alive and going..
            And enjoy the fact that your car is exactly what you want it to be and people tend to OOOH AND AAAHHH it as you show it or drive it.. Why then do some feel that a modified owner is not allowed to be exactly what they want theirs to be?? IT IS STILL A CROSLEY.  
             
            MY OPINION and sorry for the length.. I will get off my soap box now.
            Bob        
             
                                
          • Richard Williams
            You did it VERY well. I am with you at this point. Have fun and enjoy the little cars as YOU want, not everyone else. My 48 StaWgn NELLIE as I have named her
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 29, 2009
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              You did it VERY well. I am with you at this point. Have fun and enjoy the little cars as YOU want, not everyone else. My 48 StaWgn "NELLIE" as I have named her is a slight MOD as some say. I think it is fine the way it is. My first car was a 48 Crosley convert. which the engine froze one day as it leaked all the oil out. It never ran right after my Dad had it fixed by a mechanic, so it got sold. SIGH I have never forgotten that little car.
              Rich W

              --- On Wed, 7/29/09, BOB ROSS <antiqbob@...> wrote:

              From: BOB ROSS <antiqbob@...>
              Subject: =CROSLEY= Re: Old versus new.
              To: Crosley@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 10:51 AM

               
              I have been watching this thread and keep fighting with myself about giving my .02 cents.
               
              With the Crosleys, my father had one and as such I grew up with fond memories of them. Back then, I remember playing with the propeller on the front of the crosley and riding it thru the neighborhood and even getting to "drive it" (steer more appropriate, as my feet didnt even reach half way to the floor or pedals etc.)
               
              I am sure most of you notice that crosley ownership tends to restrict itself to a certain age group...Those of us with memories of them. As I grow older I am more and more convinced that the love of cars like the Crosleys will tend to die out as we do...
               
              As to modifying one or not it strikes me that while utilitarian in a lot of senses the Crosleys probably will have little in the way of appeal for the younger generation (unless grampa's grandson/granddaugh ter- you know the ones NOW out there spinning the propeller). As they grow into the caretaker position, I think that they will not be as concerned with "Purity" as much as convience. Can I take it to the corner grocery store to get that loaf of bread, or to brother Toms home 100 miles away.
               
              I feel very strongly that the collector cars, will tend to be like a funnel... Going from us and narrowing down as we pass untill very little interest in cars like the Crosleys, or the Model T's, or the Hillmans.
               
              I do think that the modified cars however will have some appeal to this younger generation.. Check out the price of "origional cars" compared to "modified cars". Sadly the modified cars are overwhelming the Origionals.. Why, because "I THINK" they are more of a convience car. I am afraid that these will be the cars that will maintain the enthusiasm. The modified car that the owner can climb in and join the superhighway and "cruise" along at 70 mph.. With the Air blowing cold, the Stereo blasting (too high in my opinion)..but I am old so what do I know??... Then again, I too, like the cold air conditioning. ..
               
              Origionality is a great thing, but I am afraid that if we take too hard a line against the "modified" versions than you are certainly sending a message that the group is not interested in perpetuating anything other than what origionally came from the factory. This in my opinion will certainly not bode well for bringing in the younger generation who will in time be the caretakers. Look at the split this has caused already..
               
              Is it a Crosley because it is painted a non factory color? How about if the bumper is turned upside down?? Is it a Crosley because it has a 4 speed transmission from an Austin Healey installed??  So why not be satisfied that there is an interest in keeping the breed alive and going..
              And enjoy the fact that your car is exactly what you want it to be and people tend to OOOH AND AAAHHH it as you show it or drive it.. Why then do some feel that a modified owner is not allowed to be exactly what they want theirs to be?? IT IS STILL A CROSLEY.  
               
              MY OPINION and sorry for the length.. I will get off my soap box now.
              Bob        
               
                                  

            • mrcooby
              BOB ROSS wrote: I have been watching this thread and keep fighting with myself about giving my .02 cents. With the Crosleys, my father had
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 31, 2009
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                "BOB ROSS" <antiqbob@...> wrote:

                "I have been watching this thread and keep fighting with myself about giving my .02 cents.

                "With the Crosleys, my father had one and as such I grew up with fond memories of them. Back then, I remember playing with the propeller on the front of the crosley and riding it thru the neighborhood and even getting to "drive it" (steer more appropriate, as my feet didnt even reach half way to the floor or pedals etc.)

                "I am sure most of you notice that crosley ownership tends to restrict itself to a certain age group...Those of us with memories of them. As I grow older I am more and more convinced that the love of cars like the Crosleys will tend to die out as we do...
                =====================
                I've heard that theory myself and there may be some of that, Bob, but with Crosley production ending 57 years ago they seem to still have no problem selling, especially the decent ones. Most vintage-car hobbyists are middle-aged, it seems, including those who fancy marques that died as far back as the '20s and '30s. As proof I can recommend seeking out and meeting the owners of vintage cars at meets.
                =====================
                "As to modifying one or not it strikes me that while utilitarian in a lot of senses the Crosleys probably will have little in the way of appeal for the younger generation (unless grampa's grandson/granddaughter- you know the ones NOW out there spinning the propeller)."
                =====================
                I respectfully disagree, Bob, for the reasons I gave earlier.
                =====================
                As they grow into the caretaker position, I think that they will not be as concerned with "Purity" as much as convience. Can I take it to the corner grocery store to get that loaf of bread, or to brother Toms home 100 miles away."
                =====================
                I'm in definite agreement. If I can't drive a car that far with reasonable confidence, I don't want it.
                =====================
                "I feel very strongly that the collector cars, will tend to be like a funnel... Going from us and narrowing down as we pass untill very little interest in cars like the Crosleys, or the Model T's, or the Hillmans."
                =====================
                That fear has been expressed many times in car clubs; I've heard it elsewhere myself. Yet so far it seems unfounded because the cars still seem to find buyers and the prices continue to rise. Thirty years ago, nice Crosleys were still selling in the hundreds. In 1981 I paid $600 for my solid Liberty Sedan, and the seller threw in a 1973 Chevrolet Impala.
                ====================
                "I do think that the modified cars however will have some appeal to this younger generation.."
                ====================
                There's some of that among the young, certainly, but I see lots of interest in automotive history among those in their mid-'20s and up. There's no shortage of folks that age and older who ask the right questions and it's fun to mingle with them. I really don't hear very many inappropriate comments when I'm out in the Crosleys, and as a rule those who make them look like they don't have very many social graces anyways, so I consider the source.
                ====================
                "Check out the price of "origional cars" compared to "modified cars".
                ====================
                Actually the Barrett-Jackson auctions continue to prove the originals are far more valuable, and for more reasons than one. With a modified car, you're never sure what kind of workmanship went into it.
                ====================
                "Sadly the modified cars are overwhelming the Origionals.."
                ====================
                I'm sad over a rare car that's been modified too, but I really don't think that's so. The hotrodders are very vocal while the OEM crowd is more laid back, so it might seem that way, but I believe it's an illusion. You might see lots of modifieds at "cruise nights", but at
                car shows they're in the definite minority.
                ===================
                "Why, because "I THINK" they are more of a convience car. I am afraid that these will be the cars that will maintain the enthusiasm. The modified car that the owner can climb in and join the superhighway and "cruise" along at 70 mph.. With the Air blowing cold, the Stereo blasting (too high in my opinion)..but I am old so what do I know??... Then again, I too, like the cold air conditioning..."
                ===================
                My '47 cruises nicely at 70 but the car is tight and well-maintained. As far as cold air, well, I enjoy the Crosley experience and there's my regular wheels for other times. (A 2003 Ford Police Interceptor.)
                ===================
                "Origionality is a great thing, but I am afraid that if we take too hard a line against the "modified" versions than you are certainly sending a message that the group is not interested in perpetuating anything other than what origionally came from the factory."
                ===================
                That's exactly the message of our CCOC: preservation and restoration.
                There are clubs specifically for hotrodders, and I'm sure you or I could join them if we chose to, but they are for hotrodders and we'd have to conform to their stated purpose, that's understood, just as our CCOC stated purpose is on the homepage.
                ===================
                "This in my opinion will certainly not bode well for bringing in the younger generation who will in time be the caretakers. Look at the split this has caused already.."
                ===================
                I'll put it this way: our CCOC will always take the high road. Our purpose is clear, and as such we're like most other one-make clubs out there, to preserve the brand and support our compatriots who share that goal. Anybody can join the CCOC but discussions will be towards keeping the Crosleys running as built.
                Let me add that there are two clubs for American Bantam/Austin and dozens of clubs for Ford Model As. Between 1969 and about 1989 there were two Crosley clubs that co-existed peaceably. We will respect all clubs and require the same.
                ===================
                "Is it a Crosley because it is painted a non factory color? How about if the bumper is turned upside down?? Is it a Crosley because it has a 4 speed transmission from an Austin Healey installed?? So why not be satisfied that there is an interest in keeping the breed alive and going.."
                ===================
                My view is that a Crosley body on a completely different drivetrain doesn't make it a Crosley, any more than a New York Yankees uniform on a Little Leaguer makes him/her a Yankee. I have two Crosleys in non-stock colors and one with the wrong bumpers, but I didn't torch the cars and what I did can be easily reversed. I can still call Butch and Fonda or Dave Edwards or Tony Smith or Robert Kirk and get stock parts. The more Crosleys that fall to the blowtorch, the fewer Crosleys there will be that need OEM parts. It's more than history that mandates we keep these cars original, and more than loving the Crosley experience with its bouncy ride and noisy engine, it's necessity for all our sakes. As an example: engine bearings are scarce. If enough Crosleys had their engines switched to something else, there's a point where it wouldn't pay to supply bearings.
                ===================
                "And enjoy the fact that your car is exactly what you want it to be and people tend to OOOH AND AAAHHH it as you show it or drive it.. Why then do some feel that a modified owner is not allowed to be exactly what they want theirs to be?? IT IS STILL A CROSLEY."
                ===================
                I won't venture to dictate taste but I respectfully disagree on it still being a Crosley. I call it a kit car with a Crosley body.
                ===================
                "MY OPINION and sorry for the length.. I will get off my soap box now.
                Bob"
                ===================
                Not at all, Bob. I apologize for the delay in replying, but it's been one busy summer. Thanks again for writing. You'll always be welcome.

                =Lou=
              • tim foster
                ... I had never realized that the two clubs existed concurrently- i thought that the CCOC died out in the sixties.   Do you have any details about that period
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 31, 2009
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                  >>Between 1969 and about 1989 there were two Crosley clubs that co-existed peaceably. We >>will respect all clubs and require the same.

                  I had never realized that the two clubs existed concurrently- i thought that the CCOC died out in the sixties.  

                  Do you have any details about that period of CCOC?  Did they hold meets, publish newsletters, etc?  I know they were really active in the fifties but I've never seen anything from the later period.  What happened to the club in '89?


                • mrcooby
                  tim foster wrote: Between 1969 and about 1989 there were two Crosley clubs that co-existed peaceably. We will respect all clubs and require
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 1, 2009
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                    tim foster <timtmaker@...> wrote:
                    "Between 1969 and about 1989 there were two Crosley clubs that co-existed peaceably. We >>will respect all clubs and require the same."
                    I had never realized that the two clubs existed concurrently- i thought that the CCOC died out in the sixties.
                    ===============
                    It did, Tim, but I was referring to the Miamisburg Crosley Car Club and the Crosley Automobile Club, both of which started in 1969 and operated concurrently for twenty years.
                    =============== 
                    "Do you have any details about that period of CCOC?  Did they hold meets, publish newsletters, etc?  I know they were really active in the fifties but I've never seen anything from the later period.  What happened to the club in '89?"
                    ===============
                    I'll have a complete early-CCOC history up soon, Tim. The Miamisburg Crosley club dissolved when its 20-year-president Juanita Cummings died. Thanks, Tim.

                    =Lou=
                    >
                  • mrcooby
                    tim foster wrote: Between 1969 and about 1989 there were two Crosley clubs that co-existed peaceably. We will respect all clubs and require the
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 10, 2009
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                      tim foster <timtmaker@...> wrote:

                      Between 1969 and about 1989 there were two Crosley clubs that co-existed peaceably. We will respect all clubs and require the same.

                      I had never realized that the two clubs existed concurrently- I thought that the CCOC died out in the sixties.  
                      ================
                      That is true, Tim. The CCOC never actually disbanded at that time, it just faded. I still paid my $3.00 dues into the early 1970s and for that got an occasional newsletter which offered a discount on Crosley parts.
                      ===============
                      Do you have any details about that period of CCOC?  Did they hold meets, publish newsletters, etc?  I know they were really active in the fifties but I've never seen anything from the later period.  What happened to the club in '89?
                      ===============
                      The CCOC was totally dormant by the 1970s; you might be thinking of the Miamisburg Crosley Car Club, which faded after its 20-year founder/president Juanita Cummins passed on.
                      The MCCC was basically a newsletter club. I was a member, though I can't recall any in-person meets. Anyone know if there were?

                      Back to the early CCOC:

                      The CCOC meets were officially called "Get-Togethers". The first was in Metropolitan Park, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio on July 18, 1954; the event chairman was W. T. Palmer of Akron, Ohio.
                      130 CCOC members, family members and guests from 12 states (Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, New York, Indiana, Michigan, Delaware, North Carolina, New Jersey, Minnesota, Maryland and Florida) attended in 43 Crosleys and eight non-Crosley cars. Local police escorted the Crosleys in convoy on a tour of the city.

                      Prizes were awarded as follows:
                      *Longest-Distance Driven:
                      Mr. & Mrs. M. W. Washburn, Tampa FL (4 new tires).
                      *Best-Kept Crosley:
                      Tom Lees, S. Euclid OH.
                      *First To Arrive:
                      S.P.Hickman, Jr., Phila. PA
                      *Lowest CCOC Number there:
                      Richard L. Martin, Newell WV
                      *Highest CCOC Number there:
                      Jim Alfredson, E.Lansing MI.

                      The main topic of conversation was the future of the Crosley, followed by the usual operational, service and parts problems and ideas for bigger and better CCOC Get-Togethers.

                      Trivia: Home movies of the event show CCOCers wearing suits and dresses. Faribault MN dealer Charlie Nicholas caused a sensation in his "Flying Saucer", built with Crosley parts. One CCOC member, R. L. Martindale of E. Lansing MI, never arrived due to a failed generator in his '52 CD Sport Convertible. Picnic lunches were served.
                      **************************
                      The second annual CCOC Get-Together was on August 14, 1955 at Menlo Park, Perkasie, Pennsylvania with David Wilson of Perkasie the event chairman. Hurricane Connie caused some cancellations.
                      37 Crosleys from ten states (Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, New York, Delaware, New Jersey, Maryland, New Hampshire, Virginia and North Carolina) drew a thousand local spectators to the grounds. A six-mile Crosley convoy tour followed.

                      Prizes were awarded as follows:
                      *Longest-Distance Driven:
                      Fred. H. Murry, 2451 Grand Ave., Dayton, Ohio, 560 miles. (Four new tires)
                      *Best-Kept Stock Crosley:
                      Harold Brill, 6628 N. 18th St., Phila. PA (Gold trophy, two tires and a compass)
                      *Best Restored Crosley:
                      Howard D. Matthews, 6175 Little Richmond Rd., Dayton OH (Compass, 2 quarts of oil, ashtray, backup lights)
                      *First CCOC Member There:
                      O. K. Perkins, 6A Melba Ct., Brooklyn NY (Compass and fuel pump).
                      *Best Modified Crosley:
                      Roy E. Wilson, 54 Overlook Rd., Upper Montclair NJ with his Crosley's heavily-chromed engine and bright-red paint. (Ashtray, backup lights and compass).
                      *Lowest CCOC Number There:
                      Ralph G. Morrill, 436 N. Forklanding Rd., Maple Shade NJ (Two tires).
                      Highest CCOC Number There:
                      Arthur J. Timm, 323 Miller Place, Mt. Vernon NY (Fuel pump and compass).
                      (Those prizes were donated by Ed Herzog, George W. Drum and Service Motors.)

                      Trivia: Chairman David Wilson provided free ride tickets to all CCOC members and guests.
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