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  • Joel Ventura
    Vic: I got this email from a friend of mine today. He is an instructor, and I think some of his questions are motivated by the desire to build multiengine
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 7 8:32 AM
      Vic:
      I got this email from a friend of mine today. He is an instructor, and
      I think some of his questions are motivated by the desire to build multiengine
      time. I thought you could answer these questions better than I. I can answer
      question 4 however-- I plan to build it, but not for a few years. Thanks for
      your help.
      --Joel

      -------------------

      Subject:
      Cricket
      Date:
      Mon, 06 Aug 2001 21:45:00 -0400
      From:
      Bruce Meacham <bruce_meacham@...>
      Reply-To:
      bruceme@...
      To:
      ventura@...




      Our conversation on Saturday got me thinking...

      #1 I've read some usenet threads on the Cricket and the information seems
      inconclusive weather it's a multi and or a single. It seams quite obviously
      multi per the FAA's thinking. Perhaps it's concidered centerline thrust
      because the engines are so close. But that's a different issue.

      #2 What's the reputation of the Cricket? Is it a solid design? I can't
      find much useful design info on the web. Like how many and how big are the
      fuel tanks?

      #3 How big an engine do you nead for a reasonable single engine climb (200
      fpm)?

      #4 I'm just curious, what are you planning to do with yours?

      Bruce Meacham

      "My soul is in the sky."
      — William Shakespeare, 'A Midsummer Night's Dream,' Act V. Scene I.
    • Robin.stoddartstones@btinternet.com
      #1)In the UK it is a single engine aircraft, with a conversion that must include twin engine assymetric flight practice. ( I used a Cougar GA7)It may well
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 7 10:19 AM
        #1)In the UK it is a single engine aircraft, with a conversion that
        must include twin engine assymetric flight practice. ( I used a
        Cougar GA7)It may well qualify now as a JAR complex aircraft.

        #2) In the UK, the cumulative aircraft have spent longer in repair
        shops than they have flying (Comment of PFA engineer). This doesnt
        mean flying hours, it's calendar time! It has one 35 litre fuel tank.

        #3) JPX (210 cc) should do it

        #4) Fly it.

        However I wouldn't use it to build twin hours on.

        Have Fun
        Robin

        --- In CriCri@y..., Joel Ventura <ventura@b...> wrote:
        > Vic:
        > I got this email from a friend of mine today. He is an
        instructor, and
        > I think some of his questions are motivated by the desire to build
        multiengine
        > time. I thought you could answer these questions better than I. I
        can answer
        > question 4 however-- I plan to build it, but not for a few years.
        Thanks for
        > your help.
        > --Joel
        >
        > -------------------
        >
        > Subject:
        > Cricket
        > Date:
        > Mon, 06 Aug 2001 21:45:00 -0400
        > From:
        > Bruce Meacham <bruce_meacham@h...>
        > Reply-To:
        > bruceme@e...
        > To:
        > ventura@b...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Our conversation on Saturday got me thinking...
        >
        > #1 I've read some usenet threads on the Cricket and the information
        seems
        > inconclusive weather it's a multi and or a single. It seams quite
        obviously
        > multi per the FAA's thinking. Perhaps it's concidered centerline
        thrust
        > because the engines are so close. But that's a different issue.
        >
        > #2 What's the reputation of the Cricket? Is it a solid design? I
        can't
        > find much useful design info on the web. Like how many and how big
        are the
        > fuel tanks?
        >
        > #3 How big an engine do you nead for a reasonable single engine
        climb (200
        > fpm)?
        >
        > #4 I'm just curious, what are you planning to do with yours?
        >
        > Bruce Meacham
        >
        > "My soul is in the sky."
        > — William Shakespeare, 'A Midsummer Night's Dream,' Act V. Scene I.
      • Victor Asp
        I will answer the best I can... ... I believe that the FAA does not care because it is EXPERIMENTAL. You could have ten engines and you would still be allowed
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 11 11:58 PM
          I will answer the best I can...

          >
          > Our conversation on Saturday got me thinking...
          >
          > #1 I've read some usenet threads on the Cricket and the information seems
          > inconclusive weather it's a multi and or a single. It seams quite obviously
          > multi per the FAA's thinking. Perhaps it's concidered centerline thrust
          > because the engines are so close. But that's a different issue.
          I believe that the FAA does not care because it is EXPERIMENTAL. You
          could have ten engines and you would still be allowed to fly. Now
          whether you would have the skill is another story.


          >
          > #2 What's the reputation of the Cricket? Is it a solid design? I can't
          > find much useful design info on the web. Like how many and how big are the
          > fuel tanks?
          I have read anything I could find about the Cricket (CriCri) and talked
          to many experienced pilots. Put aside the short comings (tight cockpit,
          limited range, sensitivity to weight...) and all the pilots have said it
          is a very nice aircraft. There was one fatal crash due to poor
          modifications but I have also heard of one aircraft exceeding Vne with
          "no problems". It does require one to use good building practices and
          follow the plans very carefully. The engineer who designed it, I
          believe, knew alot about structures and stress analysis (I am a
          structural engineer) from reading his instructions and plans. As for
          the tanks, make that one tank, located below your calves and knees or
          should I say supports your lower legs, it only holds about 6 gallons.
          This could give you about 3 hrs of cruise, depending on engines.
          >
          > #3 How big an engine do you nead for a reasonable single engine climb (200
          > fpm)?
          The 15 hp engines will give you a single engine climb of 200 fpm IF (and
          it is an important if) you do not exceed max gross weight, are
          developing full power, near sea level.... Yes, the aircraft is
          sensitive to weight. Basically, I learned from the pilot of N200LB (he
          is an ATP, 6'2" and 200 lbs, flying in Salt Lake City at 4000' MSL) that
          if one engine quits you start looking for a place to put it down. You
          will "glide" with a very low descent rate.

          >
          > #4 I'm just curious, what are you planning to do with yours?
          I am planning to have as much fun as I can turning heads. ;-)


          Later,
          Vic
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