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The Extinction of Evolution

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  • Dan Cadd
    The Extinction of Evolution A couple years ago I was watching a nature program on the discovery channel. It was kind of ho hum, until the ending which was so
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 1, 2001
      The Extinction of Evolution

      A couple years ago I was watching a nature program on the discovery
      channel. It was kind of ho hum, until the ending which was so
      comical that I had to laugh out loud and point at the tv in disbelief
      at what they had just said.

      The majority of the program was reporting on the destruction of the
      rain forests and other natural habitats. They were trying to alert
      and alarm the audience to the problems this could cause if it were to
      continue.

      One of the many problems that they pointed out, was that the
      extinction rate of species had been fairly consistant through out
      history, up to about forty years ago. But that since then the
      extinction rate has more than tripled, and is still increasing as
      different critters natural habitats are being destroyed. That the
      extinction rate going back as far as they could see was about 300
      species per year, and now it is up to 1,000.

      Here comes the comic relief. Next, they had to do the nature shows
      required evolution propaganda spot.

      "And it takes 10,000 years for a new species to evolve, so you can
      see why it took so long for everything to come into existence."

      I was stunned at first, then I couldn't stop chuckling. Oops, the
      editor didn't catch it, and evolutionary rates got mentioned back to
      back. Evolutionists can't afford to do that, because their rates
      often work against each other.

      Lets just take a look at these two rates in a formula.

      -300 species go extinct per year
      + 1 new species every 10,000 years
      + billions of years
      = Every species

      By this formula by the time we get one new species, 3 million have
      gone extinct. So obviously, the more time the fewer species, which
      is exactly opposite of what the theory of evolution states.

      Of course, these rates will be disputed and new ones suggested by
      various evolutionists. But no matter what rates they come up with,
      if the rate of new species evolving into existence, isn't higher than
      the average historical extinction rate. The theory of evolution
      can't be considered valid, it should go the way of the dinosaurs and
      be considered extinct too.
      Dan Cadd
    • Chris Ashcraft
      10,000 years for species to evolve is quite ridiculous! Speciation is simply the reproductive isolation of a breeding group that is part of a larger
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 2, 2001
        10,000 years for species to evolve is quite ridiculous! Speciation is
        simply the reproductive isolation of a breeding group that is part of a
        larger population. Speciation occurs through many mechanisms and it is
        clear that it is part of the design by which organisms adapt to
        environmental inconsistencies. Speciation allows the effect of natural
        selection to be amplified by isolating the gene pool that is
        experiencing the selective affect. If there is no reproductive
        isolation, the favorable phenotype which will be relatively dilute in a
        large gene pool, but in smaller groups a uniquely beneficial form could
        take over in a couple of generations and completely change the nature of
        the organism in that region.

        It is quite possible some organisms speciated even before being released
        from the ark, but it is certain every creature speciated almost
        immediately following their release. The primary mechanism inducing
        speciation is migration, and more specifically migration into
        uncolonized regions. During the release or postflood reoccupation, the
        animals migrated onto an empty planet and the certainty of geographic
        isolation during such a movement means that there may well have been
        1000 speciation events the first year.

        Evolution occurs by design through a history of genetic recombination
        and natural selection. Mutations and randomness have nothing to do with
        it. The differences found among offspring from the same parents are not
        due to mutations, but crossing-over reactions performed by the cell
        during meiosis. It is from these differences that nature selects and
        through which evolution occurs. These reactions are part of the grand
        design and are performed so that organism can specialize to
        environmental specifics. Genetic recombination is almost totally
        uncharacterized, and as such we can place no limitation on their ability
        to modify the genome or the characteristics of the individual.

        Christopher W. Ashcraft
        Plant Transformation Specialist
        EDEN Bioscience
        ashcraftC@...

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Dan Cadd [mailto:dan@...]

        >"And it takes 10,000 years for a new species to evolve, so you can
        >see why it took so long for everything to come into existence."

        >Lets just take a look at these two rates in a formula
        >-300 species go extinct per year
      • Dan Cadd
        Chris, ... I certainly won t disagree with you that 10,000 years for a new species to evolve is ridiculous. That wasn t my number, I was only quoting the
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 2, 2001
          Chris,

          You wrote:
          > 10,000 years for species to evolve is quite ridiculous! Speciation
          >is simply the reproductive isolation of a breeding group that is
          >part of a larger population. Speciation occurs through many
          >mechanisms and it is clear that it is part of the design by which
          >organisms adapt to environmental inconsistencies.

          I certainly won't disagree with you that 10,000 years for a new
          species to evolve is ridiculous. That wasn't my number, I was only
          quoting the nature show. However, I have heard the same number used
          from other sources, why some evolutionist groups have chosen it, I
          have no idea. But personally I think the actual answer is that it
          never happens.

          The Speciation that you are referring to, I would call adaptability
          within a species Kind, not a entirely new kind of species. I readily
          agree with you that the environmental changes species were faced with
          after the flood, caused a variety of changes within kinds of species,
          so that they could adapt to different situations. But I don't think
          that they changed to become distinctly new kinds. I think God set
          down the boundaries when He created us, each to reproduce after our
          own kind, even though I do think there is a wide range of
          adaptability within a kind.
          Dan Cadd
        • Chris Ashcraft
          ... From: Dan Cadd [mailto:dan@dancadd.com] ... answer is ... think ... Speciation never happens? The establishment of reproductively isolated populations is
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 3, 2001
            -----Original Message-----
            From: Dan Cadd [mailto:dan@...]

            >I certainly won't disagree with you that 10,000 years for a new
            >species to evolve is ridiculous. But personally I think the actual
            answer is
            >that it never happens.

            >The Speciation that you are referring to, I would call adaptability
            >within a species Kind, not a entirely new kind of species. But I don't
            think
            >that they changed to become distinctly new kinds.

            Speciation never happens? The establishment of reproductively isolated
            populations is so common, it may occur every day...

            A species is a breeding population that is reproductively isolated from
            other such groups. The species state is very important for the
            evolutionary success of the organism, and critical for understanding the
            history of any Biblical kind.

            Speciation occurs at the moment a reproducing group becomes separated
            from its parent population. The species state is therefore transient as
            the two groups can reunite at any point. However, there appears to be an
            instinctive impulse that induces organism to remain reproductively
            isolated after reuniting, and following an extended period of separation
            the two groups can become permanently incompatible and unable to mate
            under any circumstance.

            These two factors indicate that speciation occurs by design, and from
            what we know of evolution it appear to play a significant role in the
            ability of any Biblical kind to adapt to multiple habitats. Speciation
            or reproductive isolation allows the result of genetic recombination to
            become inbred within a minor subgroup. Such inbreeding converts any
            population to a pure breed that will soon only distribute the selected
            characteristic to future offspring. Speciation is a divinely designed
            breeding program for characteristics proven naturally beneficial...

            Speciation assures that a beneficial form has a chance to transform a
            portion of the kind population to a new form. If speciation never
            occurred, then the entire kind would theoretically all look the same,
            and adaptations to specific environmental conditions would likely not
            occur or at a snails pace in comparison. Animals do evolve, and
            speciation is key to understanding why a kind now exists as numerous and
            maybe even countless species with different physical and behavioral
            characteristics. These differences were developed during period of
            reproductive isolation we call speciation.

            Chris Ashcraft
            Genetic Engineer - Plant Transformations
          • Dan Cadd
            Brother Chris, ... It is an interesting point of view and not without merits, and I can see that you are convinced that your conclusions are the best
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 3, 2001
              Brother Chris,

              You wrote (readers digest version):
              >...following an extended period of separation the two groups can
              >become permanently incompatible and unable to mate under any
              >circumstance.
              >
              > Speciation assures that a beneficial form has a chance to transform
              >a portion of the kind population to a new form. If speciation never
              >occurred, then the entire kind would theoretically all look the same,
              >and adaptations to specific environmental conditions would likely not
              >occur or at a snails pace in comparison. Animals do evolve, and
              >speciation is key to understanding why a kind now exists as numerous
              >and maybe even countless species with different physical and
              >behavioral characteristics.

              It is an interesting point of view and not without merits, and I
              can see that you are convinced that your conclusions are the best
              explanation of the facts (you may be right). However, I have yet to
              be persauded that macro or micro evolution even exist, or have ever
              played a part of the variety of creatures that we see. I think
              another just as plausible explanation, is that God made a enormous
              variety of kinds, and a wide range of adaptability within kinds, but
              that creatures never evolve beyond their kinds.

              I certainly haven't seen evidence that any humans have evolved
              beyond our kind yet (Jesus excluded).

              May the Lord bless you and yours!!! Dan Cadd
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