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Re: [CreationTalk] Tough Earth Bugs May Be From Mars- New Scientist

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  • Jason Bassett
    Jason Bassett wrote: The purpose of why God would create a bug so resistant to radiation, that is sort of a side issue to this fellows point. You are right
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 1, 2002
      Jason Bassett wrote:
       The purpose of why God would create a bug so resistant to radiation, that is sort of a side issue to this fellows point.
       
      You are right about it being a side issue, its like speculating as to why an artist used one shade of blue and not another. Also allowing it to live in high radiation environments would be one reason for creating a bug so resistant to radiation.
       
      Evolutionists often try very hard to pin us down to a dogmatic reasons why God did something. The reason could be as simple as just to make evolution look silly. :)
       
      Besides which, with as many sci fi movies as we see I think the general public really wants to believe in alien life.
       
      What is interesting is, I happen to think that there is life on Mars; though it came from Earth. First if all the Viking Labeled Release Experiment produced positive results in checking for life on mars.  http://www.biospherics.com/mars/spie/spiehtml.htm
       
      Further more the brake up of the Fountains of the deep would have had enough force to ejected large amounts of water and other material in to space, some bacteria may have survived a trip Mars. Also all it would have take is a pre-food Martian colony, flight to Mars, or  just an unsterilized probe to have seed Mars with Bacteria. In any case if the bacteria had been fruitful and multiplied, It would be all over Mars today.
       
      Life on Mars is not the question, it's the fact that they have no real evidence that the Bacteria in question are from Mars. The logic boils down to this.
       
      1. Assumption -  Life evolved.
      2. Fact 1 - Bacteria could not have evolved their resistant to radiation on Earth.
      3. Fact 2 - Mars is the closest planet that can ( however marginally) support life.
      4. Conclusion the Bacteria came from Mars.
       
      You are right that there is no hint in the article the ever question the basic assumption.
       
      That's very interesting. This scenario you describe makes a lot of sense, but unfortunately I think the secular world never take it seriously. I almost wish this data was never discovered. After all, we have enough trouble convincing them of a global flood, let alone that alleged alien life is really from earth. But I appreciate your reply, you always have worthwhile post.
       
    • ad101867
      Charles, I m not sure how this is
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 4, 2002
        Charles,

        < Also allowing it to live in high radiation environments would be
        one reason for creating a bug so resistant to radiation. >

        I'm not sure how this is an argument. The question is, WHAT high-
        radiation environment? Where would this environment exist, since it
        isn't on Earth?

        Regards,
        Andy
      • Charles Creager Jr.
        How about out space? First off I was just offering a logical possibility; not really an argument. The point was that there are logical reasons for making these
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 4, 2002
          How about out space?

          First off I was just offering a logical possibility; not really an argument. The point was that there are logical reasons for making these bugs resistant to radiation.

          Second. It shows a good example of divine providence. God knew that one day some of these bugs would be blasted into space by the break-up of the Fountains of the deep and designed them to survive it.

          The point is that God them deigned organisms to survive, that would included planing for future threats.

           --- Charles Creager Jr.

          ad101867 wrote:

          Charles,

          < Also allowing it to live in high radiation environments would be
          one reason for creating a bug so resistant to radiation. >

          I'm not sure how this is an argument.  The question is, WHAT high-
          radiation environment?  Where would this environment exist, since it
          isn't on Earth?

          Regards,
          Andy

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