Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Transitional forms

Expand Messages
  • Andy Doerksen
    I came across the following two posts at different sites, and I invite comments on this or other transitional-related concepts. Let me bring up again the
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 15, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      I came across the following two posts at different sites, and I invite
      comments on this or other transitional-related concepts.

      "Let me bring up again the earliest known chordate, Pikaia, from the
      Cambrian Burgess shale. This was originally interpreted as a polychaete
      (segmented) worm until recent reanalysis demonstrated that the segments are
      actually the remains of the notochord that became the vertebral column in
      all later chordates that descended from either Pikaia or a close relative.
      So we have the ultimate "missing transitional form": the link between the
      invertebrates and the vertebrates."
      http://www.arn.org/boards/ubb-get_topic-f-1-t-001069.html

      "/Pikaia/ is _not_ a vertebrate - no one can say if this particular creature
      is our direct predecessor. Nevertheless, /Pikaia/ is a representative
      member of the chordate group from which we undoubtedly arose. It resembles
      a living chordate commonly known as the lancet."
      http://www.nmnh.si.edu/paleo/shale/ppikaia.htm
    • Cliff Lundberg
      From: Andy Doerksen ... invite ... particular creature ... representative ... It resembles ... My opinion is at
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 16, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        From: "Andy Doerksen" <andronicus@...>


        > I came across the following two posts at different sites, and I
        invite
        > comments on this or other transitional-related concepts.

        > "/Pikaia/ is _not_ a vertebrate - no one can say if this
        particular creature
        > is our direct predecessor. Nevertheless, /Pikaia/ is a
        representative
        > member of the chordate group from which we undoubtedly arose.
        It resembles
        > a living chordate commonly known as the lancet."

        My opinion is at
        http://home.inreach.com/cliff_lundberg/segment/trad.html

        Cliff
      • Denyse O'Leary
        The helpful information you have provided demonstrates that Pikaia is the earliest known chordate but there is no means of knowing whether it is an ancestor of
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 16, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          The helpful information you have provided
          demonstrates that Pikaia is the earliest known
          chordate but there is no means of knowing
          whether it is an ancestor of anything, without
          more information.

          It is just as likely that the ancestor of modern
          vertebrates is still buried somewhere.

          What Pikaia, in itself, demonstrates is that
          chordates have been around from the earliest
          times of complex organisms.

          Some have argued in the past that
          chordates/vertebrates are a sort of "superior"
          group of animals, but you would not know it from
          their actual history.

          Stephen Jay Gould enlarges this point in
          Wonderful Life, his book on the Burgess Shale.

          While many feel he goes a bit overboard in the
          direction of pure chance (and I agree), he is
          good at redressing the record by pointing to the
          true history of life, as opposed to the
          popular Darwinian folklore.

          Incidentally, by "popular Darwinian folklore,"
          I do not mean what professional paleontologists
          say, but rather the sort of "Ascent of Man"
          graphics often seen in the media.

          If these graphics are indeed correct, they are
          evidence for the work of an intelligent
          designer, not for the workings of law and
          chance. If that nasty little monkey at the far
          left really turned straightforwardly into the
          movie idol at the far right, someone (Someone?)
          clearly made choices.

          Denyse


          Andy Doerksen wrote:
          > I came across the following two posts at different sites, and I invite
          > comments on this or other transitional-related concepts.
          >
          > "Let me bring up again the earliest known chordate, Pikaia, from the
          > Cambrian Burgess shale. This was originally interpreted as a polychaete
          > (segmented) worm until recent reanalysis demonstrated that the segments are
          > actually the remains of the notochord that became the vertebral column in
          > all later chordates that descended from either Pikaia or a close relative.
          > So we have the ultimate "missing transitional form": the link between the
          > invertebrates and the vertebrates."
          > http://www.arn.org/boards/ubb-get_topic-f-1-t-001069.html
          >
          > "/Pikaia/ is _not_ a vertebrate - no one can say if this particular creature
          > is our direct predecessor. Nevertheless, /Pikaia/ is a representative
          > member of the chordate group from which we undoubtedly arose. It resembles
          > a living chordate commonly known as the lancet."
          > http://www.nmnh.si.edu/paleo/shale/ppikaia.htm
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Remember: attack the *position* not the *person*!
          > Subscribe: CreationEvolutionDesign-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > Unsubscribe: CreationEvolutionDesign-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >


          --
          To see what's new in faith and science issues,
          go to www.designorchance.com
          My next book, By Design or By Chance?: The
          Growing Controversy Over the
          Origin of Life in the Universe (Castle Quay
          Books, Oakville) will be
          published Spring 2004.

          To order, call Castle Quay, 1-800-265-6397,
          fax 519-748-9835, or visit www.afcanada.com
          (CDN $19.95 or
          US$14.95).

          Denyse O'Leary
          14 Latimer Avenue
          Toronto, Ontario, CANADA M5N 2L8
          Tel: 416 485-2392/Fax: 416 485-9665
          oleary@...
          www.denyseoleary.com
        • pimvanmeurs
          ... wrote: --Begin Quote If these graphics are indeed correct, they are evidence for the work of an intelligent designer, not for the workings of
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 16, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In CreationEvolutionDesign@yahoogroups.com, Denyse O'Leary
            <oleary@s...> wrote:
            --Begin Quote
            If these graphics are indeed correct, they are evidence for the work
            of an intelligent designer, not for the workings of law and chance.
            If that nasty little monkey at the far left really turned
            straightforwardly into the movie idol at the far right, someone
            (Someone?) clearly made choices.
            --End Quote

            How did you reach this conclusion? Are you assuming that humans as
            we are right now were the goal? Humans and monkeys share common
            ancestry, what's wrong with these 'pictures' I wonder?
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.