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Re: [Coulda-Been-Country] Re: Dean Martin songs, request

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  • J Mason
    Cliff, my apologies for answering the mail before reading all of it, and thanks again. Larry, about the Eddie Arnold song, the recently-posted one was THE
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 1, 2009
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      Cliff, my apologies for answering the mail before reading all of it, and thanks again.

      Larry, about the Eddie Arnold song, the recently-posted one was THE one--for better or worse, the other one just didn't have that sound. Most people probably like the newer versions better, but I learned to like country music by listening to the old Eddie Arnold songs, among others, like Hank Thompson and Hank Williams, Moon Mullican, and many others, in the late '40s.

      Sometimes I'll find a record for a half dollar or so at a yard sale, play it and be disappointed that it's redos. I realize that it's all, or mostly, about money. Or maybe really an attempt to improve--but, to my thinking, it never (or maybe seldom) does.

      I have an old machine--3-speed turntable, cassette, and 8-track that I got for a dollar at a yard sale several years ago, and transfer music from records and 8-tracks to cassette. I recently got a car with a CD player only, and have been copying from tapes to CDs--a lot more trouble than recording to cassettes, which, of course, are obselete.

      I'm told that CDs will be obselete soon, the latest thing being flash drives, which are much easier to get along with. Maybe I should just skip the CDs and get a flash drive player for the car <G>. They are available, I hear. I don't buy new CDs, or much of anything new, for that matter, but will have to make an exception in this case.

      Again, many thanks to both of you. Sorry for the dissertation------------
      Regards,
      J Mason

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Larry Davis
      To: Coulda-Been-Country@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 12:49 AM
      Subject: Re: [Coulda-Been-Country] Re: Dean Martin songs, request





      Of course, Cliff posted the Hank Thompson song J.

      I went ahead and posted Eddy's other version of "I Walk Alone". It must be the one you recall.

      The one labeled "1st version) is from July, 1945. It was first issued on Bluebird 0535.

      In December, 1948, Eddy recorded it again. That's the version you already had in files. They put out the remake as RCA Victor 2128. According to the notes in the Bear Family box set on Eddy, both the first and the second version wound up being issued on 2128 on different pressings. It's not explained whether that was a mistake or intentional, but I've heard of it happening with other releases too. So it sounds as though two different stations might have been playing two different versions of the song by Eddy in 1949, with both recordings having the same release number.

      As for it being the song that started Eddy on the road to success, the story of the live performance could well be true, but when Eddy got around to recording it for Bluebird 0535, he'd already scored a chart hit with "Each Minute Seems A Million Years", it was #5 in 1945 on Bluebird 0527. "I Walk Alone" was actually Eddy's third release by RCA, the first being 0520 with "Mommy Please Stay Home With Me" b/w "Mother's Prayer", recorded in Dec. 1944. So Eddy's singing "I Walk Alone" on stage may have been pivotal in his career or the story could just be apocryphal.

      Larry Davis

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "J Mason" <signman3331@...>
      To: <Coulda-Been-Country@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:59 PM
      Subject: Re: [Coulda-Been-Country] Re: Dean Martin songs, request

      > Many thanks, Larry, for posting the music by Eddie Arnold and Hank Thompson.
      > They were good, even if they weren't the versions I used to hear back in
      > the late '40s and 50s.
      >
      > And thanks also for the information about the music. I didn't remember who
      > did I'll Walk Alone.
      >
      > I heard a DJ relate many years ago that one of Spade Cooley's guitar players
      > stepped forward during one of his performances and sang I Walk Alone --thus
      > was the beginning of Eddie Arnold's career. Can't vouch for the truth of
      > that, however, it does seem somewhat logical. I used to think that was his
      > first recording, but somebody told me differently--don't remember what it
      > was, though.
      >
      > Thanks again for a great link to the past.
      >
      > Regards,
      > J Mason
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Larry Davis
      Thanks for confirming that it s the 1945 version that was the one that was familiar to you. When there are two released versions, so close together in time
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 1, 2009
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        Thanks for confirming that it's the 1945 version that was the one that was familiar to you. When there are two released versions, so close together in time (three years), and both of them are from before I have any memory of having heard the song, I don't really have any way of knowing which should be considered the "hit" version.

        It seems like this is another case of the artist or record label trying to "improve" or update a recording when the public preferred the original and pretty much rejected the new recording.
        Here are some other examples: In 1947, possibly because of it's use in the 1946 film "The Time The Place And The Girl", Perry Como's 1939 recording of "I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now", made for Decca Records with Ted Weem's orchestra, became a smash hit. But Como was then signed with RCA Victor so they rushed Perry into the studio and cut a new version with Lloyd Shaffer and the Satisfiers. In spite of RCA's efforts at promoting their release, the Decca recording still became the big hit and almost no one played or cared about the remake.

        In 1968, thanks to its inclusion in the film "Bonnie & Clyde", Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs's 1949 Mercury recording of "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" found new interest. A new recording for their then current label, Columbia was issued and promoted too. In this case, Billboard couldn't decide just which version was getting the most action so they combined the sales and play of both versions to determine its chart position.

        My final example is from 1990. When the Righteous Brothers 1965 recording of "Unchained Melody" was featured prominently in the movie "Ghost", it generated renewed interest at both radio and retail sales. Their label Curb had them record a new version to take advantage of the interest and the new recording did quite well, getting to #19 and going gold. However, the original Philles hit, was reissued on the Verve label and the original recharted and beat out the remake, getting to #13 on the Hot 100.

        I think this reflects a common feeling that I share too. If I learn to like a song from a particular recording, then even if a new version becomes a hit later on, I'm still likely to prefer the original. It's not so much which was recorded first, but which one I heard first. There are some cases where I think the remake actually improved upon the older version, but there aren't very many of those for me.

        Larry Davis

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "J Mason" <signman3331@...>
        To: <Coulda-Been-Country@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 6:25 AM
        Subject: Re: [Coulda-Been-Country] Re: Dean Martin songs, request


        > Cliff, my apologies for answering the mail before reading all of it, and thanks again.
        >
        > Larry, about the Eddie Arnold song, the recently-posted one was THE one--for better or worse, the other one just didn't have that sound. Most people probably like the newer versions better, but I learned to like country music by listening to the old Eddie Arnold songs, among others, like Hank Thompson and Hank Williams, Moon Mullican, and many others, in the late '40s.
        >
        > Sometimes I'll find a record for a half dollar or so at a yard sale, play it and be disappointed that it's redos. I realize that it's all, or mostly, about money. Or maybe really an attempt to improve--but, to my thinking, it never (or maybe seldom) does.
        >
        > I have an old machine--3-speed turntable, cassette, and 8-track that I got for a dollar at a yard sale several years ago, and transfer music from records and 8-tracks to cassette. I recently got a car with a CD player only, and have been copying from tapes to CDs--a lot more trouble than recording to cassettes, which, of course, are obselete.
        >
        > I'm told that CDs will be obselete soon, the latest thing being flash drives, which are much easier to get along with. Maybe I should just skip the CDs and get a flash drive player for the car <G>. They are available
        , I hear. I don't buy new CDs, or much of anything new, for that matter, but will have to make an exception in this case.
        >
        > Again, many thanks to both of you. Sorry for the dissertation------------
        > Regards,
        > J Mason
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Larry Davis
        > To: Coulda-Been-Country@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 12:49 AM
        > Subject: Re: [Coulda-Been-Country] Re: Dean Martin songs, request
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Of course, Cliff posted the Hank Thompson song J.
        >
        > I went ahead and posted Eddy's other version of "I Walk Alone". It must be the one you recall.
        >
        > The one labeled "1st version) is from July, 1945. It was first issued on Bluebird 0535.
        >
        > In December, 1948, Eddy recorded it again. That's the version you already had in files. They put out the remake as RCA Victor 2128. According to the notes in the Bear Family box set on Eddy, both the first and the second version wound up being issued on 2128 on different pressings. It's not explained whether that was a mistake or intentional, but I've heard of it happening with other releases too. So it sounds as though two different stations might have been playing two different versions of the song by Eddy in 1949, with both recordings having the same release number.
        >
        > As for it being the song that started Eddy on the road to success, the story of the live performance could well be true, but when Eddy got around to recording it for Bluebird 0535, he'd already scored a chart hit with "Each Minute Seems A Million Years", it was #5 in 1945 on Bluebird 0527. "I Walk Alone" was actually Eddy's third release by RCA, the first being 0520 with "Mommy Please Stay Home With Me" b/w "Mother's Prayer", recorded in Dec. 1944. So Eddy's singing "I Walk Alone" on stage may have been pivotal in his career or the story could just be apocryphal.
        >
        > Larry Davis
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "J Mason" <signman3331@...>
        > To: <Coulda-Been-Country@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:59 PM
        > Subject: Re: [Coulda-Been-Country] Re: Dean Martin songs, request
        >
        > > Many thanks, Larry, for posting the music by Eddie Arnold and Hank Thompson.
        > > They were good, even if they weren't the versions I used to hear back in
        > > the late '40s and 50s.
        > >
        > > And thanks also for the information about the music. I didn't remember who
        > > did I'll Walk Alone.
        > >
        > > I heard a DJ relate many years ago that one of Spade Cooley's guitar players
        > > stepped forward during one of his performances and sang I Walk Alone --thus
        > > was the beginning of Eddie Arnold's career. Can't vouch for the truth of
        > > that, however, it does seem somewhat logical. I used to think that was his
        > > first recording, but somebody told me differently--don't remember what it
        > > was, though.
        > >
        > > Thanks again for a great link to the past.
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > > J Mason
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
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