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Vintage Vocabulary

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  • Jes24601@aol.com
    Tara, I m a bit confused as to how to use the terminology in the Vocabulary of Basic Terms for Cataloging Costume . (i.e. how is does it differ from what I ve
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 3, 2001
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      Tara, I'm a bit confused as to how to use the terminology in the "Vocabulary
      of Basic Terms for Cataloging Costume". (i.e. how is does it differ from what
      I've already written?) Is it like one of those "animal, genis, specis"
      things, or have a totally missed how simple it really is?
      Also, I'm leaving for Hawaii (yippee!!) on the 7th and getting back on the
      18th,  I'll do all the assignments ahead of time that I can, but since I'm
      not sure I'll have interent access, if I am not responsive on the message
      board, that'll be why. :-)

      ~Jessica
    • Tara Maginnis
      ... Vocabulary ... from what ... specis ... It is a bit like the animal, genus, etc. thing, but still quite simple. Your present description is very
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 3, 2001
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        --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., Jes24601@a... wrote:
        > Tara, I'm a bit confused as to how to use the terminology in the
        "Vocabulary
        > of Basic Terms for Cataloging Costume". (i.e. how is does it differ
        from what
        > I've already written?) Is it like one of those "animal, genis,
        specis"
        > things, or have a totally missed how simple it really is?

        It is a bit like the "animal, genus, etc." thing, but still quite
        simple. Your present description is very detailed like a narrative
        descriptionn should be, but the next assignment is to use that
        terminology to do a very short general description of the garment such
        as might be included on a database at a museum. Your narrative
        description reads thus:

        "For my historical garment study I chose a 1957 cocktail dress
        made by my great grandmother.
        My reasons for choosing this garment, (rather than an older one, but I
        was born in 1985, so I'm at
        an advantage here. ;-) was a.) the fact that my great grandmother made
        it, b.) I have the complete
        ensemble – there is a matching hat too!, and c.) I have the original
        pattern as well. All this was
        sent to me courtesy of my wonderful grandmother. But back to the
        garment itself.
        The dress is constructed of a bright pink velvet. And has a
        three-quarter length sleeves,
        amid-calf hem length, a "v" neckline. Two sashes are attached to the
        bodice at the side seams and
        are meant to cross in front and snap together at the back. There is a
        tuck at the elbow of each
        sleeve to give them their shaping. It is unlined, but there is a light
        pink satin as facing on the neck.
        There is a metal zipper on one side that runs from the under arm to
        the hip. The bodice's shape is
        made by darts: two vertical ones in the back and two diagonal (from
        mid-side seam to the bust
        point) in front. Lingerie straps, my great grandmother's trademark,
        can be found on the inside
        shoulder seams. The skirt front is gathered slightly and the skirt
        back is pleated symmetrically –
        three times on each side.
        What is interesting, a sash that attaches to one shoulder has
        been added, but I'm not really
        sure weather it is supposed to drape over the other shoulder or just
        hang there. The dress has also
        been altered somewhat from the pattern. On the pattern dress the two
        side sashes tie in a bow in
        the back, rather then the simple clip in the actual thing. Also the
        pattern has a much lower
        neckline than the garment, the story behind this, reasoned by my mom
        and aunt was that my great
        grandfather never allowed his wife to dress too "provocatively", thus
        the altering. "

        This is very good, but more complicated than would be used on a short
        descriptive label.

        A museum database description might begin:

        1.11 Dress(1)
        7.1 Hat
        12.5 Dressmaking Materials

        Probably a database would go further (reading the introduction at
        http://www.open.gov.uk/mdocassn/costume/vbt00e.htm will reveal that
        this system is just for the beginning of the description) and
        depending on the preferences of the collection might go on in a
        variety of ways, like any of these:

        1.11 Dress(1),1957, American, no label, Cocktail dress, pink cotton
        velvet.
        7.1 Hat, c. 1957, French, "Fu-fu Mode", cocktail hat, pink straw.
        12.5 Dressmaking Materials, Commerical Pattern, American, "McCall's
        #12345", printed paper.

        1.11 Dress(1), Pink cotton velvet with rayon satin lining, American,
        1957, Jessica's Grandmother's Name, Birth-Death.
        7.1 Hat, Pink Straw with feather trimmings and velvet artificial
        flowers, French, c. 1957, "Fu-fu Mode", house in operation 1952-1968.
        12.5 Dressmaking Materials, Commerical Printed Pattern, American, c.
        1957, "McCall's #12345", company in operation 190?-Present.

        1.11 Dress(1), Cocktail dress, 1957, home-made by Jessica's
        Grandmother's Name, American, Birth-Death, cotton velvet, rayon satin,
        zip fastener. Worn by Jessica's Grandmother's Name, and altered in
        style from pattern item number.
        7.1 Hat, Cocktail hat, c.1957, "Fu-fu Mode", Paris, France, straw
        braid, feathers, velvet. Originally worn by Jessica's Grandmother's
        Name with item number of dress.
        12.5 Dressmaking Materials, Commercial Pattern for a Cocktail Dress,
        c. 1957, American, "McCall's #12345", paper. Used by Jessica's
        Grandmother's Name to make item number of dress.

        IMPORTANT FOR EVERYBODY:

        As you can see each set of descriptions focus on different things,
        include data in different order, and some are more detailed than
        others. Museums usually have their own systems because musums focus
        on different things. For example, a museum that focused on the
        wearers of clothing (like a history museum) might use the third
        method, whereas a place that was interested in designers and makers of
        fashion might use the second. The method you choose will be
        based on what YOU think is important. However, increasingly museums,
        particularly in the European Union, are using the numbers and terms
        found in the vocabulary to begin their descriptions, in order to
        assist in data retrieval. Since this has come about due to the rise of
        the internet, and may one day be how you can sit at home in Alaska and
        search through thousands of museum records worldwide to find images of
        garments in museums, I thought I'd best bring it to your attention.
        Some of you have garment collections, work with garment collections,
        or will begin collecting garments because of the seed of this
        assignment. I want to have you begin your description that heads your
        final asssignment with these very short terms, and then think about
        what other brief information you think is important to begin with.
        So! You make up a short, simple description of your item, focusing on
        what you think is important for your "colllection" and use the
        terminology and numbers from the Vocabulary
        http://www.open.gov.uk/mdocassn/costume/vbt00e.htm to begin it. That
        is the assignment in a nutshell.
      • Jes24601@aol.com
        ... Thanks so much, I m clear on it now! :-) ~Jessica
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 4, 2001
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          > and that is the assignment in a nutshell.

          Thanks so much, I'm clear on it now! :-)

          ~Jessica
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