Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [CostumeHistoryClass] EK- on study garment

Expand Messages
  • TJTBW502@aol.com
    Oh Eleanor; Your garment sounds absolutly yummy. For my garment, I have chossen a bodice from the mid-1850s. I have patterned this bodice and graded it up to a
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 1, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Oh Eleanor;
      Your garment sounds absolutly yummy. For my garment, I have chossen a bodice from the mid-1850s. I have patterned this bodice and graded it up to a size 16. The original was only about a size 3. More info in my paper that is to come.

      Jackie Wakeling
      BTW, for any of you out there that are interested, my new e-mail address if tjtbw502@...
    • eleanorkeene@start.com.au
      Sounds wonderful. Where did you find your bodice? ... a bodice from the mid-1850s. I have patterned this bodice and graded it up to a size 16. The original was
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 1, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Sounds wonderful. Where did you find your bodice?



        --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., TJTBW502@a... wrote:
        > Oh Eleanor;
        > Your garment sounds absolutly yummy. For my garment, I have chossen
        a bodice from the mid-1850s. I have patterned this bodice and graded
        it up to a size 16. The original was only about a size 3. More info in
        my paper that is to come.
        >
        > Jackie Wakeling
        > BTW, for any of you out there that are interested, my new e-mail
        address if tjtbw502@h...
      • Tara Maginnis
        I had no notion they had press studs/snaps that early! In our tiny collection at UAF our first garment with snaps is not till around 1910. From the
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 2, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          I had no notion they had press studs/snaps that early! In our tiny
          collection at UAF our first garment with snaps is not till around
          1910. From the description it sounds like a highly "zippy"
          fashionable garment that must have truly wowed folks with all it's
          piping, multihued silk, detachable peplum, etc. I can imagine the
          wearer turned heads in what at the time must have been a pretty
          spartan, provincial place. It sounds like a truly fun garment. Do
          you have any information on the wearer or donor? When was it
          donated/bought into the collection? From the description it does not
          sound like a home-made garment, so it seems strange it is label-less.
          Then, it isn't until the next decade that labels become nearly
          endemic. I would bet that the most intriguing angle to take on your
          report would be the context of the garment, where it was made, worn,
          what was arong it in contrast, etc. Unfortunately I can't say that I
          have any Idea where you might find such a thing on the net. I once
          tried doing a search on "Australian Dress" (and similar variations)
          and came up with zip. You would need to find print sources at your
          end to do this if you want. I do have non- Australian 1860's links at
          http://www.costumes.org/pages/victlinks.htm#1860's but if you are
          looking for Australian fashions of the 19th Century you will need to
          hunt down the book "Duck and Cabbage Tree"

          --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., eleanorkeene@s... wrote:
          > 30/3/01
          > Eleanor Keene
          > Final project garment,
          > Stage one.
          > Brief description of garment and why I chose it:
          >
          > For my final project study piece I have chosen an 1860's Victorian
          day
          > dress.
          > As I currently work as a museum intern to a Curator of Costume, I
          had
          > the privilege for a 'free range' chose of whatever garment I liked.
          I
          > chose this piece as it is in good condition, which means it can
          easily
          > be handled and photographed, as well as the fact it would come up
          well
          > in photographs.
          > I was drawn to this period, as it is the time of British settlement
          to
          > my home country of New Zealand. This topic being an interest of
          mine.
          > From my mother's side of the family, I am descended from a young
          > couple that came out on the first settlers boat to New Zealand in
          > 1840. The woman being a Milliner and her husband a Cabinetmaker.
          > The image of full-skirted Victorian dresses is an icon of our
          > settlement and past, so beautifully depicted in the film 'The
          Piano'.
          > Here in Australia, although the settlement of convicts started in
          1787
          > and the first free settlers started arriving in 1793, the great
          influx
          > of settlement didn't start till about the 1840/50's with the great
          > gold rush. Also through Victoria's rein it was openly encouraged and
          > assisted passages were given to skilled trades people to settle in
          > Australia and New Zealand, in an expansion of the British Empire.
          > So the garment I have chosen is equally important in Australia's
          > settlement history.
          >
          > My garment is a walking dress consisting of a fitted bodice, skirt,
          > peplum and petticoat. The garment is made out of silk taffeta of
          blue,
          > grey and cream made between 1865-67 in England, maker unknown.
          > The tight fitted bodice is shaped with darts from the waist, two on
          > either side of the centre front. It has a high neckline, with a
          > pleated stand up collar. The bodice has a centre front opening with
          > six velvet covered button adornments. It fastens with a set of hook
          > and eyes. The bodice is trimmed with fabric trims, the fabric the
          same
          > as the bodice and edged with navy bias. The trim coming over the
          > shoulder and on an angle, mirrors itself running down the side of
          the
          > bodice on either side of the front opening, to the waist. The trim
          is
          > also used on the sleeve head and around the mock cuff with same
          style
          > button adornment.
          > The skirt has a flat front decorated with five chevrons of the same
          > trim and buttons. The skirt opening appears at the left of the front
          > panel, fastening with a hook and eye at the waistband. On the right
          > side of the front panel there is a large pocket hidden among the
          > pleats. There is also a small watch pocket in the waistband near the
          > skirt opening. From the waistband there is a pleat on either side of
          > the front panel, the pleats then run all the way around from the
          side
          > front seam to the back panel where the fabric falls in cartridge
          > pleats.
          > The separate peplum is cut into five decorative points. It attaches
          to
          > the bodice using press-studs. It is also trimmed with navy bias
          trim.
        • Tara Maginnis
          I ll try to remember to post more suggestions when I get the more detailed report, meanwhile, here is where I have 1850 s Links:
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 2, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            I'll try to remember to post more suggestions when I get the more
            detailed report, meanwhile, here is where I have 1850's Links:
            http://www.costumes.org/pages/victlinks.htm#1850's There are also
            general Victorian links elsewhere on the same page.

            --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., TJTBW502@a... wrote:
            > Oh Eleanor;
            > Your garment sounds absolutly yummy. For my garment, I have chossen
            a bodice from the mid-1850s. I have patterned this bodice and graded
            it up to a size 16. The original was only about a size 3. More info in
            my paper that is to come.
            >
            > Jackie Wakeling
            > BTW, for any of you out there that are interested, my new e-mail
            address if tjtbw502@h...
          • Julia Wakeling
            The bodice that I am doing is in my own collection.The only provenance I have on this garment is that it came from the Pontiac, Michigan area and may have
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 2, 2001
            • 0 Attachment
              The bodice that I am doing is in my own collection.The only provenance I
              have on this garment is that it came from the Pontiac, Michigan area and may
              have belonged to a lady up there. I reproduce historical clothing as a
              business and use originals to base my work on. I REALLY need to take some
              time and digitally photograph all of the items in my collection (over 500
              pcs. large and small). Maybe sometime this summer I can get around to it. I
              also need to do this so I can add a rider onto my homeowners insurance for
              this collection.
              Julia Wakeling
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <eleanorkeene@...>
              To: <CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2001 8:14 PM
              Subject: [CostumeHistoryClass] Re: EK- on study garment


              >
              > Sounds wonderful. Where did you find your bodice?
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., TJTBW502@a... wrote:
              > > Oh Eleanor;
              > > Your garment sounds absolutly yummy. For my garment, I have chossen
              > a bodice from the mid-1850s. I have patterned this bodice and graded
              > it up to a size 16. The original was only about a size 3. More info in
              > my paper that is to come.
              > >
              > > Jackie Wakeling
              > > BTW, for any of you out there that are interested, my new e-mail
              > address if tjtbw502@h...
              >
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
            • Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer
              If you would like to substitute making an archive (not all 500, just starting to build it and put in as many pictures as you can) of your collection online
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 3, 2001
              • 0 Attachment
                If you would like to substitute making an archive (not all 500, just
                starting to build it and put in as many pictures as you can) of your
                collection online instead of doing the individual study of the garment
                i'm open to that if the results would be more useful for you. It would
                certainly help the webbing public, since it would put a big private
                collection out where it could be used in virtual form. You might
                consider beginning with all the menswear in your collection since you
                say you would be interested in posting advice for male reenactors to the
                web. If you would prefer to twiddle with the exact form of your project
                in this way, let me know. I'm open to useful variations that let the
                projects more closely fill students' needs.

                Julia Wakeling wrote:

                > The bodice that I am doing is in my own collection.The only provenance
                > I
                > have on this garment is that it came from the Pontiac, Michigan area
                > and may
                > have belonged to a lady up there. I reproduce historical clothing as a
                >
                > business and use originals to base my work on. I REALLY need to take
                > some
                > time and digitally photograph all of the items in my collection (over
                > 500
                > pcs. large and small). Maybe sometime this summer I can get around to
                > it. I
                > also need to do this so I can add a rider onto my homeowners insurance
                > for
                > this collection.
                > Julia Wakeling
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: <eleanorkeene@...>
                > To: <CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2001 8:14 PM
                > Subject: [CostumeHistoryClass] Re: EK- on study garment
                >
                >
                > >
                > > Sounds wonderful. Where did you find your bodice?
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., TJTBW502@a... wrote:
                > > > Oh Eleanor;
                > > > Your garment sounds absolutly yummy. For my garment, I have
                > chossen
                > > a bodice from the mid-1850s. I have patterned this bodice and graded
                >
                > > it up to a size 16. The original was only about a size 3. More info
                > in
                > > my paper that is to come.
                > > >
                > > > Jackie Wakeling
                > > > BTW, for any of you out there that are interested, my new e-mail
                > > address if tjtbw502@h...
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                [Paid Net2phone Advertisement - Click Here!]
                Paid Net2phone Advertisement - Click Here!

                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




                --
                ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer/Associate Professor
                Chair of the Theatre Department of University of Alaska Fairbanks
                Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://www.costumes.org
                Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
              • eleanorkeene@start.com.au
                There is now a small photo of the bodice of my garment on my site, under lesson 9. I have taken lots of photos, which I will paste up as the assignment
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 3, 2001
                • 0 Attachment
                  There is now a small photo of the bodice of my garment on my site,
                  under lesson 9. I have taken lots of photos, which I will paste up as
                  the assignment continues.

                  As far as I know the press-studs are authentic. I will ask at work
                  this week. I know hooks and eyes date back to fifteenth Century from
                  past research but I don't know about press-studs. I have just walked
                  off to my bookcase and come back and in The development of Costume by
                  Naomi Tarrant (great book, I've read it cover to cover, which I can't
                  say about many costume books), it states that "press studs are a late
                  19th century development" and as my garment dates to have been made
                  between 1865-7, it was either using technology at the hight of
                  fashion, or they have been later added. I wouldn't have thought this
                  the case, as there are no other markings of how it would have
                  attached. Maybe the peplum was tacked on, and then later the press
                  studs added?!
                  In response to your questions, a woman donated this dress to the
                  Museum in 1959 with a collection of other Victorian items, by the
                  name of Imogen White, who was a costume collector from what I can
                  gather. Each garment we have in the Museum has a 'blue file' with all
                  relevant history notes, plus a computer file. These days they are
                  very comprehensive, unfortunately in 1959 the records weren't so
                  detailed. The museum as no knowledge of the provenance of this
                  garment.
                  I do know it was hand made and from the museum notes it states that
                  some of it was machine sewn, I will have to go back and take a closer
                  look.
                  It is a very nice piece and I'm sure it did turn some heads but it is
                  just a day dress, from middle class background I would think,
                  possibly hand made from home?? Not especially well finished inside,
                  and on the left sleeve the fabric has been joined. It looks like they
                  must have run out of fabric. The garment is label less as many
                  garments of this time are, in our museum.
                  I know the `duck and cabbage' book well. There have actually been
                  quite a few books published on Australian fashion history, so it
                  shouldn't be hard to give you a basic background for the time of this
                  dress.

                  Eleanor


                  --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., "Tara Maginnis" <Tara@c...> wrote:
                  > I had no notion they had press studs/snaps that early! In our tiny
                  > collection at UAF our first garment with snaps is not till around
                  > 1910. From the description it sounds like a highly "zippy"
                  > fashionable garment that must have truly wowed folks with all it's
                  > piping, multihued silk, detachable peplum, etc. I can imagine the
                  > wearer turned heads in what at the time must have been a pretty
                  > spartan, provincial place. It sounds like a truly fun garment. Do
                  > you have any information on the wearer or donor? When was it
                  > donated/bought into the collection? From the description it does
                  not
                  > sound like a home-made garment, so it seems strange it is label-
                  less.
                  > Then, it isn't until the next decade that labels become nearly
                  > endemic. I would bet that the most intriguing angle to take on
                  your
                  > report would be the context of the garment, where it was made,
                  worn,
                  > what was arong it in contrast, etc. Unfortunately I can't say that
                  I
                  > have any Idea where you might find such a thing on the net. I once
                  > tried doing a search on "Australian Dress" (and similar variations)
                  > and came up with zip. You would need to find print sources at your
                  > end to do this if you want. I do have non- Australian 1860's links
                  at
                  > http://www.costumes.org/pages/victlinks.htm#1860's but if you are
                  > looking for Australian fashions of the 19th Century you will need
                  to
                  > hunt down the book "Duck and Cabbage Tree"
                  >
                  > --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., eleanorkeene@s... wrote:
                  > > 30/3/01
                  > > Eleanor Keene
                  > > Final project garment,
                  > > Stage one.
                  > > Brief description of garment and why I chose it:
                  > >
                  > > For my final project study piece I have chosen an 1860's
                  Victorian
                  > day
                  > > dress.
                  > > As I currently work as a museum intern to a Curator of Costume, I
                  > had
                  > > the privilege for a 'free range' chose of whatever garment I
                  liked.
                  > I
                  > > chose this piece as it is in good condition, which means it can
                  > easily
                  > > be handled and photographed, as well as the fact it would come up
                  > well
                  > > in photographs.
                  > > I was drawn to this period, as it is the time of British
                  settlement
                  > to
                  > > my home country of New Zealand. This topic being an interest of
                  > mine.
                  > > From my mother's side of the family, I am descended from a young
                  > > couple that came out on the first settlers boat to New Zealand in
                  > > 1840. The woman being a Milliner and her husband a Cabinetmaker.
                  > > The image of full-skirted Victorian dresses is an icon of our
                  > > settlement and past, so beautifully depicted in the film 'The
                  > Piano'.
                  > > Here in Australia, although the settlement of convicts started in
                  > 1787
                  > > and the first free settlers started arriving in 1793, the great
                  > influx
                  > > of settlement didn't start till about the 1840/50's with the
                  great
                  > > gold rush. Also through Victoria's rein it was openly encouraged
                  and
                  > > assisted passages were given to skilled trades people to settle
                  in
                  > > Australia and New Zealand, in an expansion of the British Empire.
                  > > So the garment I have chosen is equally important in Australia's
                  > > settlement history.
                  > >
                  > > My garment is a walking dress consisting of a fitted bodice,
                  skirt,
                  > > peplum and petticoat. The garment is made out of silk taffeta of
                  > blue,
                  > > grey and cream made between 1865-67 in England, maker unknown.
                  > > The tight fitted bodice is shaped with darts from the waist, two
                  on
                  > > either side of the centre front. It has a high neckline, with a
                  > > pleated stand up collar. The bodice has a centre front opening
                  with
                  > > six velvet covered button adornments. It fastens with a set of
                  hook
                  > > and eyes. The bodice is trimmed with fabric trims, the fabric the
                  > same
                  > > as the bodice and edged with navy bias. The trim coming over the
                  > > shoulder and on an angle, mirrors itself running down the side of
                  > the
                  > > bodice on either side of the front opening, to the waist. The
                  trim
                  > is
                  > > also used on the sleeve head and around the mock cuff with same
                  > style
                  > > button adornment.
                  > > The skirt has a flat front decorated with five chevrons of the
                  same
                  > > trim and buttons. The skirt opening appears at the left of the
                  front
                  > > panel, fastening with a hook and eye at the waistband. On the
                  right
                  > > side of the front panel there is a large pocket hidden among the
                  > > pleats. There is also a small watch pocket in the waistband near
                  the
                  > > skirt opening. From the waistband there is a pleat on either side
                  of
                  > > the front panel, the pleats then run all the way around from the
                  > side
                  > > front seam to the back panel where the fabric falls in cartridge
                  > > pleats.
                  > > The separate peplum is cut into five decorative points. It
                  attaches
                  > to
                  > > the bodice using press-studs. It is also trimmed with navy bias
                  > trim.
                • Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer
                  I wasn t implying the studs were newer (though they could be) I just thought it was a sign the garment was relatively with it . I ll go to the site and
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 3, 2001
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I wasn't implying the studs were newer (though they could be) I just
                    thought it was a sign the garment was relatively "with it". I'll go to
                    the site and drool on your photos virtually for a bit.

                    eleanorkeene@... wrote:

                    >
                    >
                    > There is now a small photo of the bodice of my garment on my site,
                    > under lesson 9. I have taken lots of photos, which I will paste up as
                    > the assignment continues.
                    >
                    > As far as I know the press-studs are authentic. I will ask at work
                    > this week. I know hooks and eyes date back to fifteenth Century from
                    > past research but I don't know about press-studs. I have just walked
                    > off to my bookcase and come back and in The development of Costume by
                    > Naomi Tarrant (great book, I've read it cover to cover, which I can't
                    > say about many costume books), it states that "press studs are a late
                    > 19th century development" and as my garment dates to have been made
                    > between 1865-7, it was either using technology at the hight of
                    > fashion, or they have been later added. I wouldn't have thought this
                    > the case, as there are no other markings of how it would have
                    > attached. Maybe the peplum was tacked on, and then later the press
                    > studs added?!
                    > In response to your questions, a woman donated this dress to the
                    > Museum in 1959 with a collection of other Victorian items, by the
                    > name of Imogen White, who was a costume collector from what I can
                    > gather. Each garment we have in the Museum has a 'blue file' with all
                    > relevant history notes, plus a computer file. These days they are
                    > very comprehensive, unfortunately in 1959 the records weren't so
                    > detailed. The museum as no knowledge of the provenance of this
                    > garment.
                    > I do know it was hand made and from the museum notes it states that
                    > some of it was machine sewn, I will have to go back and take a closer
                    > look.
                    > It is a very nice piece and I'm sure it did turn some heads but it is
                    > just a day dress, from middle class background I would think,
                    > possibly hand made from home?? Not especially well finished inside,
                    > and on the left sleeve the fabric has been joined. It looks like they
                    > must have run out of fabric. The garment is label less as many
                    > garments of this time are, in our museum.
                    > I know the `duck and cabbage' book well. There have actually been
                    > quite a few books published on Australian fashion history, so it
                    > shouldn't be hard to give you a basic background for the time of this
                    > dress.
                    >
                    > Eleanor
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., "Tara Maginnis" <Tara@c...> wrote:
                    > > I had no notion they had press studs/snaps that early! In our tiny
                    > > collection at UAF our first garment with snaps is not till around
                    > > 1910. From the description it sounds like a highly "zippy"
                    > > fashionable garment that must have truly wowed folks with all it's
                    > > piping, multihued silk, detachable peplum, etc. I can imagine the
                    > > wearer turned heads in what at the time must have been a pretty
                    > > spartan, provincial place. It sounds like a truly fun garment. Do
                    > > you have any information on the wearer or donor? When was it
                    > > donated/bought into the collection? From the description it does
                    > not
                    > > sound like a home-made garment, so it seems strange it is label-
                    > less.
                    > > Then, it isn't until the next decade that labels become nearly
                    > > endemic. I would bet that the most intriguing angle to take on
                    > your
                    > > report would be the context of the garment, where it was made,
                    > worn,
                    > > what was arong it in contrast, etc. Unfortunately I can't say that
                    > I
                    > > have any Idea where you might find such a thing on the net. I once
                    > > tried doing a search on "Australian Dress" (and similar variations)
                    > > and came up with zip. You would need to find print sources at your
                    > > end to do this if you want. I do have non- Australian 1860's links
                    > at
                    > > http://www.costumes.org/pages/victlinks.htm#1860's but if you are
                    > > looking for Australian fashions of the 19th Century you will need
                    > to
                    > > hunt down the book "Duck and Cabbage Tree"
                    > >
                    > > --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., eleanorkeene@s... wrote:
                    > > > 30/3/01
                    > > > Eleanor Keene
                    > > > Final project garment,
                    > > > Stage one.
                    > > > Brief description of garment and why I chose it:
                    > > >
                    > > > For my final project study piece I have chosen an 1860's
                    > Victorian
                    > > day
                    > > > dress.
                    > > > As I currently work as a museum intern to a Curator of Costume, I
                    > > had
                    > > > the privilege for a 'free range' chose of whatever garment I
                    > liked.
                    > > I
                    > > > chose this piece as it is in good condition, which means it can
                    > > easily
                    > > > be handled and photographed, as well as the fact it would come up
                    > > well
                    > > > in photographs.
                    > > > I was drawn to this period, as it is the time of British
                    > settlement
                    > > to
                    > > > my home country of New Zealand. This topic being an interest of
                    > > mine.
                    > > > From my mother's side of the family, I am descended from a young
                    > > > couple that came out on the first settlers boat to New Zealand in
                    > > > 1840. The woman being a Milliner and her husband a Cabinetmaker.
                    > > > The image of full-skirted Victorian dresses is an icon of our
                    > > > settlement and past, so beautifully depicted in the film 'The
                    > > Piano'.
                    > > > Here in Australia, although the settlement of convicts started in
                    > > 1787
                    > > > and the first free settlers started arriving in 1793, the great
                    > > influx
                    > > > of settlement didn't start till about the 1840/50's with the
                    > great
                    > > > gold rush. Also through Victoria's rein it was openly encouraged
                    > and
                    > > > assisted passages were given to skilled trades people to settle
                    > in
                    > > > Australia and New Zealand, in an expansion of the British Empire.
                    > > > So the garment I have chosen is equally important in Australia's
                    > > > settlement history.
                    > > >
                    > > > My garment is a walking dress consisting of a fitted bodice,
                    > skirt,
                    > > > peplum and petticoat. The garment is made out of silk taffeta of
                    > > blue,
                    > > > grey and cream made between 1865-67 in England, maker unknown.
                    > > > The tight fitted bodice is shaped with darts from the waist, two
                    > on
                    > > > either side of the centre front. It has a high neckline, with a
                    > > > pleated stand up collar. The bodice has a centre front opening
                    > with
                    > > > six velvet covered button adornments. It fastens with a set of
                    > hook
                    > > > and eyes. The bodice is trimmed with fabric trims, the fabric the
                    > > same
                    > > > as the bodice and edged with navy bias. The trim coming over the
                    > > > shoulder and on an angle, mirrors itself running down the side of
                    > > the
                    > > > bodice on either side of the front opening, to the waist. The
                    > trim
                    > > is
                    > > > also used on the sleeve head and around the mock cuff with same
                    > > style
                    > > > button adornment.
                    > > > The skirt has a flat front decorated with five chevrons of the
                    > same
                    > > > trim and buttons. The skirt opening appears at the left of the
                    > front
                    > > > panel, fastening with a hook and eye at the waistband. On the
                    > right
                    > > > side of the front panel there is a large pocket hidden among the
                    > > > pleats. There is also a small watch pocket in the waistband near
                    > the
                    > > > skirt opening. From the waistband there is a pleat on either side
                    > of
                    > > > the front panel, the pleats then run all the way around from the
                    > > side
                    > > > front seam to the back panel where the fabric falls in cartridge
                    > > > pleats.
                    > > > The separate peplum is cut into five decorative points. It
                    > attaches
                    > > to
                    > > > the bodice using press-studs. It is also trimmed with navy bias
                    > > trim.
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                    [Click here for Business information]
                    Click here for Business information

                    >
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




                    --
                    ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer/Associate Professor
                    Chair of the Theatre Department of University of Alaska Fairbanks
                    Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://www.costumes.org
                    Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
                  • eleanorkeene@start.com.au
                    No, the press studs thing has got me interested now, I m differently going to ask more at work, we are quite busy a the Museum this week our student fashion
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 4, 2001
                    • 0 Attachment
                      No, the press studs thing has got me interested now, I'm differently
                      going to ask more at work, we are quite busy a the Museum this week
                      our student fashion exhibition opens on Tuesday night, which I
                      believe you've had links to in the past from your site. We are also
                      now well on the way with our Moulin Rouge exhibition planning, which
                      is opening in June. The costumes are really bright and out there.
                      Should be a mad movie, a got to see a preview yesterday it is very in
                      your face extreme action romance tragedy, much like Romeo+Juliet.

                      -Eleanor


                      --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., "Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume
                      Designer" <Tara@c...> wrote:
                      > I wasn't implying the studs were newer (though they could be) I
                      just
                      > thought it was a sign the garment was relatively "with it". I'll
                      go to
                      > the site and drool on your photos virtually for a bit.
                      >
                      > eleanorkeene@s... wrote:
                      >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > There is now a small photo of the bodice of my garment on my site,
                      > > under lesson 9. I have taken lots of photos, which I will paste
                      up as
                      > > the assignment continues.
                      > >
                      > > As far as I know the press-studs are authentic. I will ask at work
                      > > this week. I know hooks and eyes date back to fifteenth Century
                      from
                      > > past research but I don't know about press-studs. I have just
                      walked
                      > > off to my bookcase and come back and in The development of
                      Costume by
                      > > Naomi Tarrant (great book, I've read it cover to cover, which I
                      can't
                      > > say about many costume books), it states that "press studs are a
                      late
                      > > 19th century development" and as my garment dates to have been
                      made
                      > > between 1865-7, it was either using technology at the hight of
                      > > fashion, or they have been later added. I wouldn't have thought
                      this
                      > > the case, as there are no other markings of how it would have
                      > > attached. Maybe the peplum was tacked on, and then later the press
                      > > studs added?!
                      > > In response to your questions, a woman donated this dress to the
                      > > Museum in 1959 with a collection of other Victorian items, by the
                      > > name of Imogen White, who was a costume collector from what I can
                      > > gather. Each garment we have in the Museum has a 'blue file' with
                      all
                      > > relevant history notes, plus a computer file. These days they are
                      > > very comprehensive, unfortunately in 1959 the records weren't so
                      > > detailed. The museum as no knowledge of the provenance of this
                      > > garment.
                      > > I do know it was hand made and from the museum notes it states
                      that
                      > > some of it was machine sewn, I will have to go back and take a
                      closer
                      > > look.
                      > > It is a very nice piece and I'm sure it did turn some heads but
                      it is
                      > > just a day dress, from middle class background I would think,
                      > > possibly hand made from home?? Not especially well finished
                      inside,
                      > > and on the left sleeve the fabric has been joined. It looks like
                      they
                      > > must have run out of fabric. The garment is label less as many
                      > > garments of this time are, in our museum.
                      > > I know the `duck and cabbage' book well. There have actually been
                      > > quite a few books published on Australian fashion history, so it
                      > > shouldn't be hard to give you a basic background for the time of
                      this
                      > > dress.
                      > >
                      > > Eleanor
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., "Tara Maginnis" <Tara@c...>
                      wrote:
                      > > > I had no notion they had press studs/snaps that early! In our
                      tiny
                      > > > collection at UAF our first garment with snaps is not till
                      around
                      > > > 1910. From the description it sounds like a highly "zippy"
                      > > > fashionable garment that must have truly wowed folks with all
                      it's
                      > > > piping, multihued silk, detachable peplum, etc. I can imagine
                      the
                      > > > wearer turned heads in what at the time must have been a pretty
                      > > > spartan, provincial place. It sounds like a truly fun
                      garment. Do
                      > > > you have any information on the wearer or donor? When was it
                      > > > donated/bought into the collection? From the description it
                      does
                      > > not
                      > > > sound like a home-made garment, so it seems strange it is label-
                      > > less.
                      > > > Then, it isn't until the next decade that labels become nearly
                      > > > endemic. I would bet that the most intriguing angle to take on
                      > > your
                      > > > report would be the context of the garment, where it was made,
                      > > worn,
                      > > > what was arong it in contrast, etc. Unfortunately I can't say
                      that
                      > > I
                      > > > have any Idea where you might find such a thing on the net. I
                      once
                      > > > tried doing a search on "Australian Dress" (and similar
                      variations)
                      > > > and came up with zip. You would need to find print sources at
                      your
                      > > > end to do this if you want. I do have non- Australian 1860's
                      links
                      > > at
                      > > > http://www.costumes.org/pages/victlinks.htm#1860's but if you
                      are
                      > > > looking for Australian fashions of the 19th Century you will
                      need
                      > > to
                      > > > hunt down the book "Duck and Cabbage Tree"
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., eleanorkeene@s... wrote:
                      > > > > 30/3/01
                      > > > > Eleanor Keene
                      > > > > Final project garment,
                      > > > > Stage one.
                      > > > > Brief description of garment and why I chose it:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > For my final project study piece I have chosen an 1860's
                      > > Victorian
                      > > > day
                      > > > > dress.
                      > > > > As I currently work as a museum intern to a Curator of
                      Costume, I
                      > > > had
                      > > > > the privilege for a 'free range' chose of whatever garment I
                      > > liked.
                      > > > I
                      > > > > chose this piece as it is in good condition, which means it
                      can
                      > > > easily
                      > > > > be handled and photographed, as well as the fact it would
                      come up
                      > > > well
                      > > > > in photographs.
                      > > > > I was drawn to this period, as it is the time of British
                      > > settlement
                      > > > to
                      > > > > my home country of New Zealand. This topic being an interest
                      of
                      > > > mine.
                      > > > > From my mother's side of the family, I am descended from a
                      young
                      > > > > couple that came out on the first settlers boat to New
                      Zealand in
                      > > > > 1840. The woman being a Milliner and her husband a
                      Cabinetmaker.
                      > > > > The image of full-skirted Victorian dresses is an icon of our
                      > > > > settlement and past, so beautifully depicted in the film 'The
                      > > > Piano'.
                      > > > > Here in Australia, although the settlement of convicts
                      started in
                      > > > 1787
                      > > > > and the first free settlers started arriving in 1793, the
                      great
                      > > > influx
                      > > > > of settlement didn't start till about the 1840/50's with the
                      > > great
                      > > > > gold rush. Also through Victoria's rein it was openly
                      encouraged
                      > > and
                      > > > > assisted passages were given to skilled trades people to
                      settle
                      > > in
                      > > > > Australia and New Zealand, in an expansion of the British
                      Empire.
                      > > > > So the garment I have chosen is equally important in
                      Australia's
                      > > > > settlement history.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > My garment is a walking dress consisting of a fitted bodice,
                      > > skirt,
                      > > > > peplum and petticoat. The garment is made out of silk taffeta
                      of
                      > > > blue,
                      > > > > grey and cream made between 1865-67 in England, maker unknown.
                      > > > > The tight fitted bodice is shaped with darts from the waist,
                      two
                      > > on
                      > > > > either side of the centre front. It has a high neckline, with
                      a
                      > > > > pleated stand up collar. The bodice has a centre front opening
                      > > with
                      > > > > six velvet covered button adornments. It fastens with a set of
                      > > hook
                      > > > > and eyes. The bodice is trimmed with fabric trims, the fabric
                      the
                      > > > same
                      > > > > as the bodice and edged with navy bias. The trim coming over
                      the
                      > > > > shoulder and on an angle, mirrors itself running down the
                      side of
                      > > > the
                      > > > > bodice on either side of the front opening, to the waist. The
                      > > trim
                      > > > is
                      > > > > also used on the sleeve head and around the mock cuff with
                      same
                      > > > style
                      > > > > button adornment.
                      > > > > The skirt has a flat front decorated with five chevrons of the
                      > > same
                      > > > > trim and buttons. The skirt opening appears at the left of the
                      > > front
                      > > > > panel, fastening with a hook and eye at the waistband. On the
                      > > right
                      > > > > side of the front panel there is a large pocket hidden among
                      the
                      > > > > pleats. There is also a small watch pocket in the waistband
                      near
                      > > the
                      > > > > skirt opening. From the waistband there is a pleat on either
                      side
                      > > of
                      > > > > the front panel, the pleats then run all the way around from
                      the
                      > > > side
                      > > > > front seam to the back panel where the fabric falls in
                      cartridge
                      > > > > pleats.
                      > > > > The separate peplum is cut into five decorative points. It
                      > > attaches
                      > > > to
                      > > > > the bodice using press-studs. It is also trimmed with navy
                      bias
                      > > > trim.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                      > [Click here for Business information]
                      > Click here for Business information
                      >
                      > >
                      > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      > > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                      Service.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --
                      > ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer/Associate Professor
                      > Chair of the Theatre Department of University of Alaska Fairbanks
                      > Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://www.costumes.org
                      > Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
                    • Julia Wakeling
                      Tara; I hadn t thought of putting the images of my collection on-line, but it would sure be the boot in the butt I need to get started on this project. I will
                      Message 10 of 11 , Apr 4, 2001
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Tara;
                        I hadn't thought of putting the images of my collection on-line, but it
                        would sure be the boot in the butt I need to get started on this project. I
                        will go ahead and post the images of the Basque jacket and the repop of it
                        as soon as I figure out how to do this with this new internet server. (I am
                        so computer stupid. I should have taken that class first.) I would
                        certainly like to try and get as many of the images posted as I can.
                        Julia Wakeling
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer" <Tara@...>
                        To: <CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2001 3:31 AM
                        Subject: Re: [CostumeHistoryClass] Re: EK- on study garment


                        > If you would like to substitute making an archive (not all 500, just
                        > starting to build it and put in as many pictures as you can) of your
                        > collection online instead of doing the individual study of the garment
                        > i'm open to that if the results would be more useful for you. It would
                        > certainly help the webbing public, since it would put a big private
                        > collection out where it could be used in virtual form. You might
                        > consider beginning with all the menswear in your collection since you
                        > say you would be interested in posting advice for male reenactors to the
                        > web. If you would prefer to twiddle with the exact form of your project
                        > in this way, let me know. I'm open to useful variations that let the
                        > projects more closely fill students' needs.
                        >
                        > Julia Wakeling wrote:
                        >
                        > > The bodice that I am doing is in my own collection.The only provenance
                        > > I
                        > > have on this garment is that it came from the Pontiac, Michigan area
                        > > and may
                        > > have belonged to a lady up there. I reproduce historical clothing as a
                        > >
                        > > business and use originals to base my work on. I REALLY need to take
                        > > some
                        > > time and digitally photograph all of the items in my collection (over
                        > > 500
                        > > pcs. large and small). Maybe sometime this summer I can get around to
                        > > it. I
                        > > also need to do this so I can add a rider onto my homeowners insurance
                        > > for
                        > > this collection.
                        > > Julia Wakeling
                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > From: <eleanorkeene@...>
                        > > To: <CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com>
                        > > Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2001 8:14 PM
                        > > Subject: [CostumeHistoryClass] Re: EK- on study garment
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > >
                        > > > Sounds wonderful. Where did you find your bodice?
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., TJTBW502@a... wrote:
                        > > > > Oh Eleanor;
                        > > > > Your garment sounds absolutly yummy. For my garment, I have
                        > > chossen
                        > > > a bodice from the mid-1850s. I have patterned this bodice and graded
                        > >
                        > > > it up to a size 16. The original was only about a size 3. More info
                        > > in
                        > > > my paper that is to come.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Jackie Wakeling
                        > > > > BTW, for any of you out there that are interested, my new e-mail
                        > > > address if tjtbw502@h...
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                        > > > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                        > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                        > [Paid Net2phone Advertisement - Click Here!]
                        > Paid Net2phone Advertisement - Click Here!
                        >
                        > >
                        > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                        > > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --
                        > ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer/Associate Professor
                        > Chair of the Theatre Department of University of Alaska Fairbanks
                        > Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://www.costumes.org
                        > Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                        > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                        >
                        >
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.