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Why I'm interested

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  • valancy@zipcon.net
    I ve been slowly drawn into the world of historical costumes and fashion. I started by just looking, then by making a pattern that pleased me, and then by
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 16, 2001
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      I've been slowly drawn into the world of historical costumes and
      fashion. I started by just looking, then by making a pattern that
      pleased me, and then by reading books.. Soon, I knew what was wrong
      with my first costume, and it didn't please me any more, so I made
      another one. More time passed, and when I pulled that one out of the
      closet one day, I realized it isn't "right" either. Now I look at
      movies and books and costumes and my mind starts racing with ideas
      and plans, and I want to know -everything- about the time period that
      just caught my fancy. I was very excited to see this class as a way
      to put all the time periods in perspective, and learn the history
      behind what I find aesthetically pleasing. Someday I would like to
      take my interest in a professional direction, so learning the how's
      and why's of historical fashion is extremely important to me.

      Denise
      Seattle, WA
    • Kristi Phinney
      It is great to find others that are as obsessed with style and fashion as I am. For as long as I can remember I have been entranced by 18th and early 19th
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 21, 2001
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        It is great to find others that are as obsessed with style and fashion as I
        am. For as long as I can remember I have been entranced by 18th and early
        19th century clothing. (When "Dangerous Liasons" came out in the movie
        theatre (the Glenn Close, John Malkevich version), I sat in my seat and just
        about drooled over the costumes all through the movie!) I currently have
        two bachelor's, one in Sociology and one in Anthropology. My future
        aspirations are to become a museum curator in costumes and textiles.
        However, as my husband is in the Air Force, we go where the government tells
        us, and we have, as of yet, been stationed in a city that has a museum
        studies graduate program. My main interest lies in French and American
        clothing from the 18th and early 19th century. I am fascinated by the
        cultural influence given to and by clothing, especially when studying gender
        differences. I am VERY excited to have found a class like this!

        Kristi Phinney
        Oklahoma City, OK
      • TondaPratt@aol.com
        I ve been interested in Elizabethan clothing for almost ten years. I m tried many attempts at making period customs and have learned from each experience. I
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 23, 2001
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          I've been interested in Elizabethan clothing for almost ten years. I'm
          tried many attempts at making period customs and have learned from each
          experience. I hope to learn new techniques and tips for sewing these outfits
          as well as find any others who are interested in my hobby.

          Tonda
        • elizkam
          I only started looking at historical clothing in the past few years. Initially my interest was just finding cool costumes to wear to parties. But then I
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 21, 2005
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            I only started looking at historical clothing in the past few years.
            Initially my interest was just finding cool costumes to wear to
            parties. But then I started getting more interested in the histories
            behind the various time periods. I've always loved history and
            anthropology, and I think that the clothes people wore can tell us a
            lot about them. And knowing why people were wearing certain outfits,
            and how they made them might help me make less cheesy recreations.
            Elizabeth
          • Tara Maginnis
            Making historical recreations is actually a very good way to learn some things about historic dress that you can t easily learn from books: how they move, how
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 22, 2005
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              Making historical recreations is actually a very good way to learn
              some things about historic dress that you can't easily learn from
              books: how they move, how they feel, and how much labor (and what
              types) go into the making of them. I personally think any costumer
              who hopes to costume actors in period wear should spend some time at
              SCA, Dickens Fairs, etc. wearing things like hoops, trains, corsets,
              funky shoes, tights & codpieces, etc. So that you can both better
              relate to the movement needs of actors, but also give them tips for
              navigation and motivation. The different feel between wearing a large
              1860's hoop or a large 1875 bustle really tells you quite a bit about
              women's roles and the transition between the two. The big hoop says
              "I am a lady, and important, stand at a distance, and treat me like
              glass." wheras the big bustle is so buttock-centric but easy to move
              in, it makes one feel, assertive, mobile, yet very sexual, since you
              can't sit, turn, or do stairs without factoring in your enormously
              decorated, eye catching, yet protected backside. You can also get up
              close, (and men can get up close) on any side except your rear, so it
              feels rather flirtatious compared to a hoop.

              --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, "elizkam" <Elizkam@a...>
              wrote:
              >
              >
              > I only started looking at historical clothing in the past few years.

              > Initially my interest was just finding cool costumes to wear to
              > parties. But then I started getting more interested in the
              histories
              > behind the various time periods. I've always loved history and
              > anthropology, and I think that the clothes people wore can tell us a
              > lot about them. And knowing why people were wearing certain
              outfits,
              > and how they made them might help me make less cheesy recreations.
              > Elizabeth
            • jayne
              ... at ... corsets, ... Not only historical costumes. I worked in wardrobe on a large scale prof musical some years ago. When the show came to Melbourne we had
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 24, 2005
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                --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, "Tara Maginnis"
                <thecostumersmanifesto@y...> wrote:
                >
                > Making historical recreations is actually a very good way to learn
                > some things about historic dress that you can't easily learn from
                > books: how they move, how they feel, and how much labor (and what
                > types) go into the making of them. I personally think any costumer
                > who hopes to costume actors in period wear should spend some time
                at
                > SCA, Dickens Fairs, etc. wearing things like hoops, trains,
                corsets,
                > funky shoes, tights & codpieces, etc. So that you can both better
                > relate to the movement needs of actors, but also give them tips for
                > navigation and motivation.


                Not only historical costumes.
                I worked in wardrobe on a large scale prof musical some years ago.
                When the show came to Melbourne we had very specific designs to work
                from and had to stick, to due to copyright.
                A few months in to the season long term strain injuries began to
                emerge.

                The costumes looked amazing but the designer had no clue how actors
                and dancers moved and took little regard when it came to repeditive
                strain on performers in oversized or awkward costumes.

                We had tennis elbow, frozen shoulder, compacted spins, tendon-itis
                etc.

                With the resident designer, a physio, three costume makers and a
                prosthetics specialist we began to re- design costumes to work with
                the performers. As a costume maker from a dance background, I was
                able to bring my knowlegde of moving on stage along with my knowledge
                of what you can physically make. It was so exciting being a part of
                something so innovative. And our teams designs were passed on to each
                of the wardrobe departments for that production, internationally

                Now everytime I start designing dance costumes I attend rehearsals
                and learn some of the moves, and try out the costumes as I make them
                so i know I'm making costumes that are safe for our performers.
                (I also amuse some shop assistants as I try high kicks or such in
                items I'm sourcing)

                mizjayne
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