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clothing worn by a social group, clique, or individual that you find

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  • claytj4eva
    Week #1 I am currently taking a Classical Indian dance class, focused on the Bharatnatyam dance style. Every class session, our Professor comes in wearing
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 20, 2010
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      Week #1
      I am currently taking a Classical Indian dance class, focused on the Bharatnatyam dance style. Every class session, our Professor comes in wearing beautiful garments such as a ghagra (“petticoat”) and a sari. Her clothing is colorful, elaborate, and at times adorned with embellishments such as mirrors or embroidery. The outfit itself is conservative; comprised of a salwar (loose trousers) and a kameez ( a long loose shirt as long as a dress). Sometimes the top is backless or halter style, but the skin exposed remains covered due to the sari. The clothing can be worn during summer, every day wear, and at times on special occasions (the more elaborate they are). This clothing is perfect for dance because it allows the dancer to be flexible, comfortable, and not have to worry about exposing herself. It allows the audience to focus on the movements, expressions and gestures, instead of the sexuality of the body form.
    • monikagbutterfly@verizon.net
      claytj4eva, I like your observation of your dance professor s attire. It shows the use of a simple, conservative garment for the purpose of free movement. At
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 20, 2010
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        claytj4eva,

        I like your observation of your dance professor's attire. It shows the use of a simple, conservative garment for the purpose of free movement. At the same time, it allows for individual expression by way of color, embroidery, or mirrors.

        Your contribution inspired me to write about the Priestesses and Naiads at my local Goddess temple. I admire their resourcefulness in keeping with the color theme associated with the celebration of the Goddess/season of the respective Sunday, e.g., wheat/gold to honor Ceres, the Roman Goddess of cereal/agriculture, or yellow, long, flowing skirts for Oshun, the African Goddess of love, money, happiness. The congregation is encouraged to wear the same colors but it is not obligatory. Long fitted dresses and tops, skirts, scarves, headscarves with sequins, crowns, bracelets, anklets, earrings, and rings bring out their beauty as goddess women in this women-only space. The Naiads, members devoted to a particular teaching at the temple, identify themselves by wearing golden scarves diagonally across their top, from left to right, with a knot at the bottom. I admire the extravagance of the flowing attire of the Centerholder of the Temple. Although I suspect that the Priestesses and Naiads change clothes before and after the service whereas I drive up in my chosen garments, the Priestesses' attire inspires me to also dress beautifully to honor the Goddess Without and Within.

        Monika

        --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, "claytj4eva" <isidro.rosalyn@...> wrote:
        >
        > Week #1
        > I am currently taking a Classical Indian dance class, focused on the Bharatnatyam dance style. Every class session, our Professor comes in wearing beautiful garments such as a ghagra (“petticoat”) and a sari. Her clothing is colorful, elaborate, and at times adorned with embellishments such as mirrors or embroidery. The outfit itself is conservative; comprised of a salwar (loose trousers) and a kameez ( a long loose shirt as long as a dress). Sometimes the top is backless or halter style, but the skin exposed remains covered due to the sari. The clothing can be worn during summer, every day wear, and at times on special occasions (the more elaborate they are). This clothing is perfect for dance because it allows the dancer to be flexible, comfortable, and not have to worry about exposing herself. It allows the audience to focus on the movements, expressions and gestures, instead of the sexuality of the body form.
        >
      • flygerl78
        I enjoy watching the bollywood movies, so this post was inteesting to me because it explains a lot about the dance scenes matching the type of clothing they
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 19, 2010
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          I enjoy watching the bollywood movies, so this post was inteesting to me because it explains a lot about the dance scenes matching the type of clothing they wear. I love the colors and flowing styles.

          Thanks!

          Mika

          --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, "claytj4eva" <isidro.rosalyn@...> wrote:
          >
          > Week #1
          > I am currently taking a Classical Indian dance class, focused on the Bharatnatyam dance style. Every class session, our Professor comes in wearing beautiful garments such as a ghagra (“petticoat”) and a sari. Her clothing is colorful, elaborate, and at times adorned with embellishments such as mirrors or embroidery. The outfit itself is conservative; comprised of a salwar (loose trousers) and a kameez ( a long loose shirt as long as a dress). Sometimes the top is backless or halter style, but the skin exposed remains covered due to the sari. The clothing can be worn during summer, every day wear, and at times on special occasions (the more elaborate they are). This clothing is perfect for dance because it allows the dancer to be flexible, comfortable, and not have to worry about exposing herself. It allows the audience to focus on the movements, expressions and gestures, instead of the sexuality of the body form.
          >
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