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Re: [CostumeHistoryClass] Week 1 part 2

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  • missie matecki
    Hi Lisa, If you find the Gothic Subculture fascinating then you would also find the emerging Steampunk subculture just as fascinating. They base their
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 11, 2009
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      Hi Lisa,
      If you find the Gothic Subculture fascinating then you would also find the emerging "Steampunk" subculture just as fascinating. They base their costuming off of Victorian as well with a more diversified twist. They include colors other than black and the" Victorian adventure" look is pretty relevent. Think 20,000 leagues under the sea or League of extraordinary gentlemen. It is loosely based off of most Jules Vern Novels and is just coming into its own. Alot of mechanical implements are added to the costuming to make it distinctive. You can research it on the web and Youtube.
      Happy Hunting!
      Missie

      --- On Tue, 11/10/09, lisamillen@... <lisamillen@...> wrote:

      From: lisamillen@... <lisamillen@...>
      Subject: [CostumeHistoryClass] Week 1 part 2
      To: CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, November 10, 2009, 6:53 PM







       











      Clothing worn by a social group in the area I live

      The Gothic subculture is easily recognisable throughout modern day society. The use of dramatic and often theatrical attire, coupled with extreme make up, creates an interesting and intense appearance. The often overstated style of this genre holds great interest for me and has encouraged me to examine the different sub groups and styles involved in modern day gothic culture - in particular the Victorian gothic group

      Paradoxically, despite gothic culture being focussed on individuality, there is a definite theme involved. Black eyeliner is part of the compulsory gothic uniform, as well as swathes of velvet, chiffon, satin and lace in the three primary gothic colours – red, black and purple. This applies regardless of sex or age.

      Despite being so restrictive, corsets and bodices are worn as an everyday item by many of the females in this subgroup. Generally these are accompanied by floor length black skirts, whether a sleek fishtail, or an elaborate bustle or crinoline skirt. Corsetry is extremely popular amongst this group, and the more wasp-wasted individuals are often admired and envied by peers who do not share their tolerance levels.

      Individuality is often expressed through the use of make-up, body piercings and tattoos. Often a person will have signature eye make-up 'sweeps' or 'flicks', as well as choosing to adorn themselves with visible piercings and tattoos, which they feel represent their personality.

      The combination of tattoos and piercings, or lack of, as well as make-up style and the hourglass figure all work together to stamp the person as an individual. Individuality is highly respected. It elevates the person's desirability and sex appeal, which is also important to this group. Females especially use the traditional hour glass figure (emphasised by corsetry and skirt shape) to attract male or female attention.

      In this genre, clothing for social occasions does not really vary from everyday attire. For the Victorian Goth the heels may get a little higher, tops a little lower cut, the makeup heavier and more jewellery will most likely be worn. However, as a rule, the Victorian Goth will just as likely be seen wearing an outfit to the supermarket as to the club.






















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • original_invariance
      My favorite style, but hard to pull off without gossip in a town of 12000 people...
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 19, 2009
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        My favorite style, but hard to pull off without gossip in a town of 12000 people...

        --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, "lisamillen@..." <lisamillen@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Clothing worn by a social group in the area I live
        > The Gothic subculture is easily recognisable throughout modern day society. The use of dramatic and often theatrical attire, coupled with extreme make up, creates an interesting and intense appearance. The often overstated style of this genre holds great interest for me and has encouraged me to examine the different sub groups and styles involved in modern day gothic culture - in particular the Victorian gothic group
        > Paradoxically, despite gothic culture being focussed on individuality, there is a definite theme involved. Black eyeliner is part of the compulsory gothic uniform, as well as swathes of velvet, chiffon, satin and lace in the three primary gothic colours – red, black and purple. This applies regardless of sex or age.
        > Despite being so restrictive, corsets and bodices are worn as an everyday item by many of the females in this subgroup. Generally these are accompanied by floor length black skirts, whether a sleek fishtail, or an elaborate bustle or crinoline skirt. Corsetry is extremely popular amongst this group, and the more wasp-wasted individuals are often admired and envied by peers who do not share their tolerance levels.
        > Individuality is often expressed through the use of make-up, body piercings and tattoos. Often a person will have signature eye make-up 'sweeps' or 'flicks', as well as choosing to adorn themselves with visible piercings and tattoos, which they feel represent their personality.
        > The combination of tattoos and piercings, or lack of, as well as make-up style and the hourglass figure all work together to stamp the person as an individual. Individuality is highly respected. It elevates the person's desirability and sex appeal, which is also important to this group. Females especially use the traditional hour glass figure (emphasised by corsetry and skirt shape) to attract male or female attention.
        > In this genre, clothing for social occasions does not really vary from everyday attire. For the Victorian Goth the heels may get a little higher, tops a little lower cut, the makeup heavier and more jewellery will most likely be worn. However, as a rule, the Victorian Goth will just as likely be seen wearing an outfit to the supermarket as to the club.
        >
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