Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: corsets

Expand Messages
  • smendozadaly
    Thanks for sharing this. I m intrigued by corsets, for some of the same reasons you mention here. They are beautiful and probably one of the most feminine
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 26, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks for sharing this. I'm intrigued by corsets, for some of the
      same reasons you mention here.

      They are beautiful and probably one of the most feminine symbols in
      fashion. But I do believe that corsets need to be custom made in
      order to avoid such discomfort. I know burlesque dancer and model
      Dita Von Teese has mentioned her custom corsets. It makes perfect
      sense. If I tried to wear a corset of the rack, it would be a
      disaster. I'm petite with a short torso. I can't even find long line
      bras that fit.

      I would love to see your corset when you are finished with it!

      Sandra
      --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, "Paula Daabach"
      <p_daabach@...> wrote:
      >
      > The corsets in the 18th century molded the waistline so it got
      > smaller. It was also higher in the back to give the bearer a good
      > posture. The corset was short so there was no support for the hips,
      > which gives the corset a V-shape. The corsets could probably not be
      > longer because of the panniers they were using at the time.
      > The corsets from the 1880's on the other hand are longer and include
      > the hips. They are, however, a little bit shorter in the back but
      > still give the wearers a thin waistline but this corset looks like an
      > X.
      > Today, on the other hand, it seems like the corsets don't have a
      > function at all but are mostly used as a sexual fetishism. Corsets
      > nowadays are generally used as garments that makes women sexy and
      > sensual and they are often not used in public, but at home in
      > private. There are, however, some corsets that functions as tops to
      > dresses, which are often very beautiful. The modern corset molds the
      > body too, but not as extremely as it did back in the day.
      > I have built and worn a corset for a costume party, and I can't
      > understand how women could wear them on a daily basis. I managed to
      > wear mine for a couple of hours before my ribcage hurt so badly that
      > I had to take it off. I think however that corsets are beautiful and
      > I would like to be able to wear them. Right now I'm building another
      > corset which is very much like the 1880's corset, but it is more for
      > the difficulty in building it than to actually wear it.
      >
    • misswisc@aol.com
      Paula, I d never worn a corset before taking this class. Several women who took it with me said that as a large busted woman, if I found a corset that fit
      Message 2 of 18 , Oct 26, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Paula,

        I'd never worn a corset before taking this class. Several women who
        took it with me said that as a large busted woman, if I found a corset
        that fit well, I'd love it. They were right! I tried on about a dozen
        before I found one that felt good. How tight it's laced and where I'm
        "placed" makes a huge difference in how comfortable I am and how well
        it fits. It's nice to be able to wear something "dressy" and strapless
        too. Some corsets have cups; others are more straight. That makes a
        difference too. I liken it to finding a great fitting pair of jeans -
        the size number is just a starting place, there's a lot more to think
        about.

        Kristi
      • Allegra Carlton
        There s an interesting article about corsets, their history and their effect upon women s health at http://ladyestellet.bravejournal.com/, which mentions in
        Message 3 of 18 , Oct 27, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          There's an interesting article about corsets, their history and their effect
          upon women's health at http://ladyestellet.bravejournal.com/, which mentions
          in passing the story that women used to have their floating ribs removed to
          make their waists smaller (it says this is possibly a myth). The
          author talks about the unlikeliness of people having ever had 16" or 18"
          waists but one of my friends who was tall and slender had an 18" waist when
          young in the late 1960s and early 70s (she doesn't now!).

          On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 10:47 PM, Paula Daabach <p_daabach@...>wrote:

          > The corsets in the 18th century molded the waistline so it got
          > smaller. It was also higher in the back to give the bearer a good
          > posture. The corset was short so there was no support for the hips,
          > which gives the corset a V-shape. The corsets could probably not be
          > longer because of the panniers they were using at the time.
          > The corsets from the 1880's on the other hand are longer and include
          > the hips. They are, however, a little bit shorter in the back but
          > still give the wearers a thin waistline but this corset looks like an
          > X.
          > Today, on the other hand, it seems like the corsets don't have a
          > function at all but are mostly used as a sexual fetishism. Corsets
          > nowadays are generally used as garments that makes women sexy and
          > sensual and they are often not used in public, but at home in
          > private. There are, however, some corsets that functions as tops to
          > dresses, which are often very beautiful. The modern corset molds the
          > body too, but not as extremely as it did back in the day.
          > I have built and worn a corset for a costume party, and I can't
          > understand how women could wear them on a daily basis. I managed to
          > wear mine for a couple of hours before my ribcage hurt so badly that
          > I had to take it off. I think however that corsets are beautiful and
          > I would like to be able to wear them. Right now I'm building another
          > corset which is very much like the 1880's corset, but it is more for
          > the difficulty in building it than to actually wear it.
          >
          >
          >



          --
          Allegra


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Bobbie Kalben
          I have studied historic garments, including corsets, for many years. There is no evidence that women ever had ribs removed to make their waists smaller. Here
          Message 4 of 18 , Oct 27, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            I have studied historic garments, including corsets, for many years. There
            is no evidence that women ever had ribs removed to make their waists
            smaller. Here is a link explaining this
            http://www.snopes.com/horrors/vanities/ribs.asp



            There have been several books written about corsets, such as:



            The Corset: A Cultural History by Valerie Steele

            Corsets and Crinolines by Norah Waugh

            Corsets: A Visual History complied by R. L. Shep

            Dress and Undress: A History of Women's Underwear by Elizabeth Ewing

            The History of Underclothes by C. Willett and Phillis Cunnington

            Remarkable Restraints: A History of Corsets from the 18th Century to the
            Present Day published by Gallery of English Costume, Platt Hall

            Support and Seduction: A History of Corsets and Bras by Béatrice Fontanel

            Waisted Efforts: An Illustrated Guide to Corset Making by Robert Doyle



            Also, if you are interested in learning how to make a corset, there are:



            The Basics of Corset Building: A Handbook for Beginners by Linda Sparks

            How to Make and Fit a Victorian Corset, a DVD by JoAnn Peterson of Laughing
            Moon



            These are only the resources I have seen, I’m sure there are many more.



            Although I am not an expert, I don’t think the purpose of the corset in the
            18th century was to make the waist smaller, but to support the breasts and
            to change the silhouette of the torso. The books listed above probably go
            into this question in detail.



            In my experience, a well fitted and well made corset that is not tight laced
            is very comfortable. I have made and wear corsets of the styles of the 18th
            century, Regency, Victorian and 1908. They are all different from each
            other but are all comfortable.





            Bobbie Kalben

            bkalben@...



            -----Original Message-----
            From: CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Allegra Carlton
            Sent: Monday, October 27, 2008 11:35 AM
            To: CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [CostumeHistoryClass] corsets



            There's an interesting article about corsets, their history and their effect

            upon women's health at http://ladyestellet.bravejournal.com/, which mentions

            in passing the story that women used to have their floating ribs removed to

            make their waists smaller (it says this is possibly a myth). The

            author talks about the unlikeliness of people having ever had 16" or 18"

            waists but one of my friends who was tall and slender had an 18" waist when

            young in the late 1960s and early 70s (she doesn't now!).



            On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 10:47 PM, Paula Daabach
            <p_daabach@...>wrote:



            > The corsets in the 18th century molded the waistline so it got

            > smaller. It was also higher in the back to give the bearer a good

            > posture. The corset was short so there was no support for the hips,

            > which gives the corset a V-shape. The corsets could probably not be

            > longer because of the panniers they were using at the time.

            > The corsets from the 1880's on the other hand are longer and include

            > the hips. They are, however, a little bit shorter in the back but

            > still give the wearers a thin waistline but this corset looks like an

            > X.

            > Today, on the other hand, it seems like the corsets don't have a

            > function at all but are mostly used as a sexual fetishism. Corsets

            > nowadays are generally used as garments that makes women sexy and

            > sensual and they are often not used in public, but at home in

            > private. There are, however, some corsets that functions as tops to

            > dresses, which are often very beautiful. The modern corset molds the

            > body too, but not as extremely as it did back in the day.

            > I have built and worn a corset for a costume party, and I can't

            > understand how women could wear them on a daily basis. I managed to

            > wear mine for a couple of hours before my ribcage hurt so badly that

            > I had to take it off. I think however that corsets are beautiful and

            > I would like to be able to wear them. Right now I'm building another

            > corset which is very much like the 1880's corset, but it is more for

            > the difficulty in building it than to actually wear it.

            >

            >

            >







            --

            Allegra





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            ------------------------------------



            Yahoo! Groups Links



            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CostumeHistoryClass/



            Individual Email | Traditional



            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CostumeHistoryClass/join

            (Yahoo! ID required)



            mailto:CostumeHistoryClass-digest@yahoogroups.com

            mailto:CostumeHistoryClass-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com



            CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Tara Maginnis
            Another one like that that shows up in lots of costume books are variations on the urban myth of spiders or mice or whatever nesting inside big hair. ...
            Message 5 of 18 , Oct 29, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Another one like that that shows up in lots of costume books are variations on the urban myth of spiders or mice or whatever nesting inside big hair.

              ---Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer Diablo Valley College
              Personal Website- The Costumer's Manifesto at http://costumes.org
              Buy my DVD-Rom Teaching series on Theatrical Makeup at http://www.theatricaldesign.com/makeup/

              --- On Mon, 10/27/08, Bobbie Kalben <bkalben@...> wrote:
              From: Bobbie Kalben <bkalben@...>
              Subject: RE: [CostumeHistoryClass] corsets
              To: CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, October 27, 2008, 8:29 PM

              I have studied historic garments, including corsets, for many years. There
              is no evidence that women ever had ribs removed to make their waists
              smaller. Here is a link explaining this
              http://www.snopes.com/horrors/vanities/ribs.asp



              There have been several books written about corsets, such as:



              The Corset: A Cultural History by Valerie Steele

              Corsets and Crinolines by Norah Waugh

              Corsets: A Visual History complied by R. L. Shep

              Dress and Undress: A History of Women's Underwear by Elizabeth Ewing

              The History of Underclothes by C. Willett and Phillis Cunnington

              Remarkable Restraints: A History of Corsets from the 18th Century to the
              Present Day published by Gallery of English Costume, Platt Hall

              Support and Seduction: A History of Corsets and Bras by B�atrice Fontanel

              Waisted Efforts: An Illustrated Guide to Corset Making by Robert Doyle



              Also, if you are interested in learning how to make a corset, there are:



              The Basics of Corset Building: A Handbook for Beginners by Linda Sparks

              How to Make and Fit a Victorian Corset, a DVD by JoAnn Peterson of Laughing
              Moon



              These are only the resources I have seen, I�m sure there are many more.



              Although I am not an expert, I don�t think the purpose of the corset in the
              18th century was to make the waist smaller, but to support the breasts and
              to change the silhouette of the torso. The books listed above probably go
              into this question in detail.



              In my experience, a well fitted and well made corset that is not tight laced
              is very comfortable. I have made and wear corsets of the styles of the 18th
              century, Regency, Victorian and 1908. They are all different from each
              other but are all comfortable.





              Bobbie Kalben

              bkalben@...



              -----Original Message-----
              From: CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Allegra Carlton
              Sent: Monday, October 27, 2008 11:35 AM
              To: CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [CostumeHistoryClass] corsets



              There's an interesting article about corsets, their history and their
              effect

              upon women's health at http://ladyestellet.bravejournal.com/, which
              mentions

              in passing the story that women used to have their floating ribs removed to

              make their waists smaller (it says this is possibly a myth). The

              author talks about the unlikeliness of people having ever had 16" or
              18"

              waists but one of my friends who was tall and slender had an 18" waist
              when

              young in the late 1960s and early 70s (she doesn't now!).



              On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 10:47 PM, Paula Daabach
              <p_daabach@...>wrote:



              > The corsets in the 18th century molded the waistline so it got

              > smaller. It was also higher in the back to give the bearer a good

              > posture. The corset was short so there was no support for the hips,

              > which gives the corset a V-shape. The corsets could probably not be

              > longer because of the panniers they were using at the time.

              > The corsets from the 1880's on the other hand are longer and include

              > the hips. They are, however, a little bit shorter in the back but

              > still give the wearers a thin waistline but this corset looks like an

              > X.

              > Today, on the other hand, it seems like the corsets don't have a

              > function at all but are mostly used as a sexual fetishism. Corsets

              > nowadays are generally used as garments that makes women sexy and

              > sensual and they are often not used in public, but at home in

              > private. There are, however, some corsets that functions as tops to

              > dresses, which are often very beautiful. The modern corset molds the

              > body too, but not as extremely as it did back in the day.

              > I have built and worn a corset for a costume party, and I can't

              > understand how women could wear them on a daily basis. I managed to

              > wear mine for a couple of hours before my ribcage hurt so badly that

              > I had to take it off. I think however that corsets are beautiful and

              > I would like to be able to wear them. Right now I'm building another

              > corset which is very much like the 1880's corset, but it is more for

              > the difficulty in building it than to actually wear it.

              >

              >

              >







              --

              Allegra





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              ------------------------------------



              Yahoo! Groups Links



              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CostumeHistoryClass/



              Individual Email | Traditional



              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CostumeHistoryClass/join

              (Yahoo! ID required)



              mailto:CostumeHistoryClass-digest@yahoogroups.com

              mailto:CostumeHistoryClass-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com



              CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



              http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


              ------------------------------------

              Yahoo! Groups Links





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Paula Daabach
              Hi everyone, I see many people have been discussing about corsets. That s fun !! I have finished my corset and put some pictures at:
              Message 6 of 18 , Dec 5, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi everyone,
                I see many people have been discussing about corsets. That's fun !! I
                have finished my corset and put some pictures at:
                http://se.msnusers.com/PaulaDaabach/mycorset.msnw?Page=1 if anyone is
                interested. We had a lot of fun taking those pictures !! :o)
                Enjoy !
                Paula.
              • Steve & Rita Harris
                Greetings from Seattle, Washington in the United States! Lovely job. Boning looks great and the busk worked out well too. I m curious however. I didn t see
                Message 7 of 18 , Dec 5, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Greetings from Seattle, Washington in the United States!

                  Lovely job. Boning looks great and the busk worked out well too.

                  I'm curious however. I didn't see any "back" photos of the binding
                  area where you pulled the laces thru. Where do they end? Top?
                  Bottom? Middle?

                  The custom corset I had made for me laces from the top AND the bottom
                  to meet with long looped tails left and right in the middle area. This
                  means that when the strings have been pulled tight, I have two long
                  loops to pull to the front of my waist to tie a bow to hold fast.

                  I was wondering how you handled that.

                  Merry Christmas everyone!!! Auntie Rita

                  --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, "Paula Daabach"
                  <p_daabach@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi everyone,
                  > I see many people have been discussing about corsets. That's fun !! I
                  > have finished my corset and put some pictures at:
                  > http://se.msnusers.com/PaulaDaabach/mycorset.msnw?Page=1 if anyone is
                  > interested. We had a lot of fun taking those pictures !! :o)
                  > Enjoy !
                  > Paula.
                  >
                • Paula Daabach
                  Hi Rita, I realised after we took the pictures that I never got a really good shot at the back of the corset. :o( But I laced it from the bottom and up.
                  Message 8 of 18 , Dec 6, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Rita,
                    I realised after we took the pictures that I never got a really good
                    shot at the back of the corset. :o( But I laced it from the bottom and
                    up. However, I couldn't find a lace that were long enough so it is two
                    shoelaces tied together so it looked like it was tied both at the top
                    and the bottom. However, I hid most of the knot and the rest of the
                    lace inside the corset behind an extra flap. (I put a flap on one side
                    of the corset that covers the "opening" under the lacing.)
                    I will see if I have time to take some pictures of the inside and the
                    back of the corset and put those up too.
                    I think it sounds interesting with the lacing of your corset, that ties
                    like a bow in the front. Cool.
                    Merry Christmas to you too !
                    Paula.
                  • Paula Daabach
                    Now there are some pictures up on the same place (http://se.msnusers.com/PaulaDaabach/mycorset.msnw?Page=1) with the lacing and the inside of the corset for
                    Message 9 of 18 , Dec 6, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Now there are some pictures up on the same place
                      (http://se.msnusers.com/PaulaDaabach/mycorset.msnw?Page=1) with the
                      lacing and the inside of the corset for those who are interested.
                      -Paula.
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.