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Re: week 1 assignment

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  • mhmillns
    I went to college (well, I am technically still attending) in Alabama. I am all to familiar with the frat boy way of dressing. Because going Greek is a big
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 26, 2006
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      I went to college (well, I am technically still attending) in
      Alabama. I am all to familiar with the frat boy way of dressing.
      Because going Greek is a big thing in the South, many people feel
      pressured to fit in. In this way, sometime I could see a transition
      of frat boys wearing t-shirts to class, then wearing polos, then
      wearing pastel polos, with Merryl shoes, and a Northface jacket.


      --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, Tara Maginnis
      <thecostumersmanifesto@y...> wrote:
      >
      > We had similar Frat Boys, and their female equivalents (which we
      called "bow-heads" for their huge clip on hair bows) in the mid
      1980s at UGA. They made a delightfully colorful sight which was
      forever amusing to watch.
      >
      > swissmiss106 <sll2@d...> wrote: Being born and raised in a small
      farming town in California, I
      > knew that life would be different when I moved to North Carolina to
      > attend Duke University. One discontinuity I didn't expect though,
      was
      > the extreme differences in dress. The group that most epitomizes
      > those differences is the typical frat boy of Duke. He can be
      > identified as such by his pastel-colored clothing, popped collar
      of a
      > polo shirt, brown loafers, and cartoon animal-patterned belt and
      > shorts. Members of this group can be further distinguished by
      > specific chapter according to the Greek letters of their chapter
      that
      > are emblazoned on their clothing. It seems that status within this
      > group is determined by the extent to which an individual's clothing
      > goes to match this ideal outfit.
      > By definition, frat boys of Duke are often seen together at
      > social occasions known as frat parties. Here they formalize their
      > appearance by wearing their same loafers, khaki pants, pastel-
      colored
      > dress shirt, bright tie, and navy (for the conservative, but also
      > found in a variety of other colors) blazer. This is the time when
      > they are also most likely to be attempting to attract women.
      Combined
      > with their attire, confident personality, and a drink in each hand
      > (one for themselves and one for the intended recipient of their
      > attentions), they dazzle her befuddled brain with the colorful
      > exhibition of a strutting peacock.
      > This all, of course, is only my own biased opinion, and I would
      > love to hear from everyone else their own experiences with the
      group.
      >
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      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
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      >
      > --
      > ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer, Professor and Chair
      > of the Theatre Department of the University of Alaska Fairbanks
      > Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://costumes.org
      > Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • jordana
      ... called bow-heads for their huge clip on hair bows) in the mid 1980s at UGA. They made a delightfully colorful sight which was forever amusing to watch.
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 26, 2006
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        --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, Tara Maginnis
        <thecostumersmanifesto@y...> wrote:
        >
        > We had similar Frat Boys, and their female equivalents (which we
        called "bow-heads" for their huge clip on hair bows) in the mid 1980s
        at UGA. They made a delightfully colorful sight which was forever
        amusing to watch.


        I started college in the mid-nineties, and I remember watching the
        frat boys and sorority girls transition away from the Greek letter
        clothing (I remember the girls would wear tees or sweatshirts with the
        letters done in tartan applique, and either a matching hair ornament
        and light blue jeans, or matching boxer shorts in hot weather, and
        always with scrunch socks and white Keds sneakers). It was around the
        first Lollapalooza concert, "alternative music" was becoming more
        mainstream, and all of a sudden, it was like someone flipped a switch.
        Overnight, all the frat boys were wearing shirts with band logos, and
        everyone was getting "tribal" tattoos and piercings and ripping their
        jeans. And those applique shirts were relegated to alumni and moms.
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