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Assignment, Week 1

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  • sunshadowlady
    Cowboy Singers–Flash and Trash Claudia J Hill History of Costume In the 1930 s through the 1950 s, the B Western movies starring singing cowboys were
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 25, 2006
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      Cowboy Singers–Flash and Trash
      Claudia J Hill
      History of Costume


      In the 1930's through the 1950's, the "B Western" movies starring
      singing cowboys were turned out at a prodigious rate by Hollywood.
      One of the attractions for these movies was the colorful, fancy
      costumes worn by the stars. Your parents or grandparents will
      remember Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Rex Allen and many others.

      In the last few years, there has been a revival of the style of
      music, called "Western" and not to be confused with "Country and
      Western," that was written and performed for these movies. All
      across the United States and Canada, Western film festivals and
      concerts are being held and attended by surprisingly large numbers
      of fans. Of course the performers at these affairs dress in
      appropriate costumes.

      I have the good fortune to be married to the very last of the
      singing movie cowboys, Tex Hill, and to have become acquainted with
      many of the old-time cowboys and their modern musical followers. I
      usually make Tex's costumes and sometimes sew for other singers.

      Concert costumes come in two varieties. Some singers (including
      Tex) prefer brightly colored
      matched shirt and pants, decorated with embroidery, appliques,
      sequins, and/or rhinestones. Both the very close fitting shirt and
      the pants are yoked and the visible seams are piped, often in
      contrasting colors. The decorations may be floral, Western, musical
      or patriotic. Closures are usually pearlized snaps. A small scarf
      is knotted at the side or front. Colorful underlays decorate the
      high-heeled boots. The hat is white (of course.) For everyday wear,
      these singers dress in a somewhat more subdued version, featuring
      jeans and yoked shirt with perhaps a bit of embroidery, but not
      sequins or rhinestones. Women dress very similarly, but have the
      option of a fringed skirt.

      The other group dress for concerts as they imagine real cowboys
      dressed. This costume for both sexes includes a long duster, an
      enormous hat, and a "wild rag" (a large scarf, folded in a triangle
      and knotted as loosely as possible at the back of the neck, draping
      down the front of the shirt. Trousers with suspenders are worn over
      an undecorated shield front shirt, and boots are plain, well worn,
      and flat-heeled. Sometimes these singers go to the length of
      smearing dust or even manure on their boots. For everyday wear,
      these singers and poets seem to favor jeans, t-shirts, ball caps,
      and sneakers.
    • Tara Maginnis
      From the film Die-hard: Hans Gruber: Uh, no I m afraid not. But you have me at a loss. You know my name but who are you? Just another American who saw too many
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 25, 2006
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        From the film Die-hard:

        Hans Gruber: Uh, no I'm afraid not. But you have me at a loss. You know my name but who are you? Just another American who saw too many movies as a child? Another orphan of a bankrupt culture who thinks he's John Wayne? Rambo? Marshall Dillon?
        John McClane: Was always kinda' partial to Roy Rogers actually. I really dig those sequined shirts.

        sunshadowlady <sunshadowlady@...> wrote: Cowboy Singers–Flash and Trash
        Claudia J Hill
        History of Costume


        In the 1930's through the 1950's, the "B Western" movies starring
        singing cowboys were turned out at a prodigious rate by Hollywood.
        One of the attractions for these movies was the colorful, fancy
        costumes worn by the stars. Your parents or grandparents will
        remember Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Rex Allen and many others.

        In the last few years, there has been a revival of the style of
        music, called "Western" and not to be confused with "Country and
        Western," that was written and performed for these movies. All
        across the United States and Canada, Western film festivals and
        concerts are being held and attended by surprisingly large numbers
        of fans. Of course the performers at these affairs dress in
        appropriate costumes.

        I have the good fortune to be married to the very last of the
        singing movie cowboys, Tex Hill, and to have become acquainted with
        many of the old-time cowboys and their modern musical followers. I
        usually make Tex's costumes and sometimes sew for other singers.

        Concert costumes come in two varieties. Some singers (including
        Tex) prefer brightly colored
        matched shirt and pants, decorated with embroidery, appliques,
        sequins, and/or rhinestones. Both the very close fitting shirt and
        the pants are yoked and the visible seams are piped, often in
        contrasting colors. The decorations may be floral, Western, musical
        or patriotic. Closures are usually pearlized snaps. A small scarf
        is knotted at the side or front. Colorful underlays decorate the
        high-heeled boots. The hat is white (of course.) For everyday wear,
        these singers dress in a somewhat more subdued version, featuring
        jeans and yoked shirt with perhaps a bit of embroidery, but not
        sequins or rhinestones. Women dress very similarly, but have the
        option of a fringed skirt.

        The other group dress for concerts as they imagine real cowboys
        dressed. This costume for both sexes includes a long duster, an
        enormous hat, and a "wild rag" (a large scarf, folded in a triangle
        and knotted as loosely as possible at the back of the neck, draping
        down the front of the shirt. Trousers with suspenders are worn over
        an undecorated shield front shirt, and boots are plain, well worn,
        and flat-heeled. Sometimes these singers go to the length of
        smearing dust or even manure on their boots. For everyday wear,
        these singers and poets seem to favor jeans, t-shirts, ball caps,
        and sneakers.








        Yahoo! Groups Links











        --
        ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer, Professor and Chair
        of the Theatre Department of the University of Alaska Fairbanks
        Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://costumes.org
        Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • eleanordew
        I think the country music tradition is a continuation of the cowboy singer tradition. If you go to Branson, MO to see some of the shows, you ll find these two
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 27, 2006
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          I think the country music tradition is a continuation of the cowboy
          singer tradition. If you go to Branson, MO to see some of the shows,
          you'll find these two extremes clearly illustrated.

          If you can't get to Branson, just take a look at the televised Grand
          Ole Opry from Nashville. On one stage you can see the "old" guard,
          i.e., Porter Wagner's generation dressed in elaborate Western suits,
          boots, and cowboy hats, all of which match and are dripping with
          sequins; and you can see the "new" country western singers, who
          dress in jeans, boots, and if they feel like dressing up, a clean
          Western shirt.

          It's a fascinating sight. -- Jean

          --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, Tara Maginnis <
          >
          > sunshadowlady <sunshadowlady@y...> wrote: Cowboy Singers–Flash
          and Trash
          > Claudia J Hill
          > History of Costume
          >
          > ...

          > Concert costumes come in two varieties. Some singers (including
          > Tex) prefer brightly colored
          > matched shirt and pants, decorated with embroidery, appliques,
          > sequins, and/or rhinestones. Both the very close fitting shirt and
          > the pants are yoked and the visible seams are piped, often in
          > contrasting colors. The decorations may be floral, Western,
          musical
          > or patriotic. Closures are usually pearlized snaps. A small scarf
          > is knotted at the side or front. Colorful underlays decorate the
          > high-heeled boots. The hat is white (of course.) For everyday
          wear,
          > these singers dress in a somewhat more subdued version, featuring
          > jeans and yoked shirt with perhaps a bit of embroidery, but not
          > sequins or rhinestones. Women dress very similarly, but have the
          > option of a fringed skirt.
          >
          > The other group dress for concerts as they imagine real cowboys
          > dressed. This costume for both sexes includes a long duster, an
          > enormous hat, and a "wild rag" (a large scarf, folded in a
          triangle
          > and knotted as loosely as possible at the back of the neck,
          draping
          > down the front of the shirt. Trousers with suspenders are worn
          over
          > an undecorated shield front shirt, and boots are plain, well worn,
          > and flat-heeled. Sometimes these singers go to the length of
          > smearing dust or even manure on their boots. For everyday wear,
          > these singers and poets seem to favor jeans, t-shirts, ball caps,
          > and sneakers.
          >
        • swissmiss106
          Your description of the outfits of cowboy singers reminds me of the western clothing my friends and I would wear when we went to jackpot shows showing our
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 29, 2006
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            Your description of the outfits of cowboy singers reminds me of the
            western clothing my friends and I would wear when we went to jackpot
            shows showing our livestock. Though not as bright and frilly, we
            still wore attention-getting clothing. My two different outfits was
            a green checked sleevelesss shirt with white pearl snaps that I wore
            with high-waisted cowgirl jeans and a dark blue long sleeve shirt
            that had vertical lines of metallic silver thread and blue snaps
            that I wore with cherry red jeans. I can't wear them in public, but
            I always loved dressing up for shows. : )
            -Stephanie













            --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, "sunshadowlady"
            <sunshadowlady@y...> wrote:
            >
            > Cowboy Singers–Flash and Trash
            > Claudia J Hill
            > History of Costume
            >
            >
            > In the 1930's through the 1950's, the "B Western" movies starring
            > singing cowboys were turned out at a prodigious rate by
            Hollywood.
            > One of the attractions for these movies was the colorful, fancy
            > costumes worn by the stars. Your parents or grandparents will
            > remember Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Rex Allen and many others.
            >
            > In the last few years, there has been a revival of the style of
            > music, called "Western" and not to be confused with "Country and
            > Western," that was written and performed for these movies. All
            > across the United States and Canada, Western film festivals and
            > concerts are being held and attended by surprisingly large numbers
            > of fans. Of course the performers at these affairs dress in
            > appropriate costumes.
            >
            > I have the good fortune to be married to the very last of the
            > singing movie cowboys, Tex Hill, and to have become acquainted
            with
            > many of the old-time cowboys and their modern musical followers.
            I
            > usually make Tex's costumes and sometimes sew for other singers.
            >
            > Concert costumes come in two varieties. Some singers (including
            > Tex) prefer brightly colored
            > matched shirt and pants, decorated with embroidery, appliques,
            > sequins, and/or rhinestones. Both the very close fitting shirt
            and
            > the pants are yoked and the visible seams are piped, often in
            > contrasting colors. The decorations may be floral, Western,
            musical
            > or patriotic. Closures are usually pearlized snaps. A small scarf
            > is knotted at the side or front. Colorful underlays decorate the
            > high-heeled boots. The hat is white (of course.) For everyday
            wear,
            > these singers dress in a somewhat more subdued version, featuring
            > jeans and yoked shirt with perhaps a bit of embroidery, but not
            > sequins or rhinestones. Women dress very similarly, but have the
            > option of a fringed skirt.
            >
            > The other group dress for concerts as they imagine real cowboys
            > dressed. This costume for both sexes includes a long duster, an
            > enormous hat, and a "wild rag" (a large scarf, folded in a
            triangle
            > and knotted as loosely as possible at the back of the neck,
            draping
            > down the front of the shirt. Trousers with suspenders are worn
            over
            > an undecorated shield front shirt, and boots are plain, well worn,
            > and flat-heeled. Sometimes these singers go to the length of
            > smearing dust or even manure on their boots. For everyday wear,
            > these singers and poets seem to favor jeans, t-shirts, ball caps,
            > and sneakers.
            >
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