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Re: [CostumeHistoryClass] week 1 assignment

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  • misswisc@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/23/2006 8:29:08 AM Central Standard Time, sll2@duke.edu writes: Combined with their attire, confident personality, and a drink in each
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 23, 2006
      In a message dated 1/23/2006 8:29:08 AM Central Standard Time, sll2@...
      writes:

      Combined with their attire, confident personality, and a drink in each hand
      (one for themselves and one for the intended recipient of their attentions),
      they dazzle her befuddled brain with the colorful exhibition of a strutting
      peacock.



      This describes men everywhere. :) Love your use of adjectives!

      I'm often amazed at how little "preppy" attire has changed over the years. I
      think it's in part due to the fact that the Preppy look consists of wardrobe
      "basics" that look good on men and women, e.g., khaki or "Chino" pants, polo
      shirts, penny loafers, monogrammed/Greek letter wool sweaters, navy blue
      blazer with gold buttons. My mom wore these in the 60s, I wore them to college
      in the 80s (right about the same time that "The Preppy Handbook" was a best
      seller), and my son wears them to school as part of his school uniform.

      Kristi






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Roslyn Howie
      I am interested in the History of Fashion and Dress because I am a member of the SCA, and our interest in costume ranges over a very broad period, so I think
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 23, 2006
        I am interested in the History of Fashion and Dress because I am a member of the SCA, and our interest in costume ranges over a very broad period, so I think having a good broad overview of the why of fashion and how it has changed can only help me in my costuming endeavours. Secondly I am just a social history nut anyway, and I love finding out why people do/did what they do/did. Thirdly, a lot of the stuff I make in the SCA isn't costume. It's clothing. I work and live in it fairly frequently so it has to be practical and functional not just look pretty.

        Looking forward to Finding Out Lots

        Roz.



        ---------------------------------
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tara Maginnis
        In the time before time, when dinousaurs walked the earth, and I was a college undergrad, I too did SCA, and had much fun getting to make historic clothing. I
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 24, 2006
          In the time before time, when dinousaurs walked the earth, and I was a college undergrad, I too did SCA, and had much fun getting to make historic clothing. I also did Dicken's Fair and Rennaisance Faire in northern California. Everybody should try reenactments of some sort at least once, it lets you know how it feels to wear other eras' dress for a whole day or weekend, out in a real (non-theatrical) environment, where people step on trains, where you need to pee or get to dance, which is highly enlightening, especially as regards movement.

          Roslyn Howie <roz_esl@...> wrote: I am interested in the History of Fashion and Dress because I am a member of the SCA, and our interest in costume ranges over a very broad period, so I think having a good broad overview of the why of fashion and how it has changed can only help me in my costuming endeavours. Secondly I am just a social history nut anyway, and I love finding out why people do/did what they do/did. Thirdly, a lot of the stuff I make in the SCA isn't costume. It's clothing. I work and live in it fairly frequently so it has to be practical and functional not just look pretty.

          Looking forward to Finding Out Lots

          Roz.



          ---------------------------------
          Do you Yahoo!?
          Yahoo! Music: Vote on Who's Next and see your favourite band live

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          Yahoo! Groups Links











          --
          ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer, Professor and Chair
          of the Theatre Department of the University of Alaska Fairbanks
          Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://costumes.org
          Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Tara Maginnis
          We had similar Frat Boys, and their female equivalents (which we called bow-heads for their huge clip on hair bows) in the mid 1980s at UGA. They made a
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 24, 2006
            We had similar Frat Boys, and their female equivalents (which we called "bow-heads" for their huge clip on hair bows) in the mid 1980s at UGA. They made a delightfully colorful sight which was forever amusing to watch.

            swissmiss106 <sll2@...> wrote: Being born and raised in a small farming town in California, I
            knew that life would be different when I moved to North Carolina to
            attend Duke University. One discontinuity I didn't expect though, was
            the extreme differences in dress. The group that most epitomizes
            those differences is the typical frat boy of Duke. He can be
            identified as such by his pastel-colored clothing, popped collar of a
            polo shirt, brown loafers, and cartoon animal-patterned belt and
            shorts. Members of this group can be further distinguished by
            specific chapter according to the Greek letters of their chapter that
            are emblazoned on their clothing. It seems that status within this
            group is determined by the extent to which an individual's clothing
            goes to match this ideal outfit.
            By definition, frat boys of Duke are often seen together at
            social occasions known as frat parties. Here they formalize their
            appearance by wearing their same loafers, khaki pants, pastel-colored
            dress shirt, bright tie, and navy (for the conservative, but also
            found in a variety of other colors) blazer. This is the time when
            they are also most likely to be attempting to attract women. Combined
            with their attire, confident personality, and a drink in each hand
            (one for themselves and one for the intended recipient of their
            attentions), they dazzle her befuddled brain with the colorful
            exhibition of a strutting peacock.
            This all, of course, is only my own biased opinion, and I would
            love to hear from everyone else their own experiences with the group.










            Yahoo! Groups Links










            --
            ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer, Professor and Chair
            of the Theatre Department of the University of Alaska Fairbanks
            Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://costumes.org
            Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • mhmillns
            I went to college (well, I am technically still attending) in Alabama. I am all to familiar with the frat boy way of dressing. Because going Greek is a big
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 26, 2006
              I went to college (well, I am technically still attending) in
              Alabama. I am all to familiar with the frat boy way of dressing.
              Because going Greek is a big thing in the South, many people feel
              pressured to fit in. In this way, sometime I could see a transition
              of frat boys wearing t-shirts to class, then wearing polos, then
              wearing pastel polos, with Merryl shoes, and a Northface jacket.


              --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, Tara Maginnis
              <thecostumersmanifesto@y...> wrote:
              >
              > We had similar Frat Boys, and their female equivalents (which we
              called "bow-heads" for their huge clip on hair bows) in the mid
              1980s at UGA. They made a delightfully colorful sight which was
              forever amusing to watch.
              >
              > swissmiss106 <sll2@d...> wrote: Being born and raised in a small
              farming town in California, I
              > knew that life would be different when I moved to North Carolina to
              > attend Duke University. One discontinuity I didn't expect though,
              was
              > the extreme differences in dress. The group that most epitomizes
              > those differences is the typical frat boy of Duke. He can be
              > identified as such by his pastel-colored clothing, popped collar
              of a
              > polo shirt, brown loafers, and cartoon animal-patterned belt and
              > shorts. Members of this group can be further distinguished by
              > specific chapter according to the Greek letters of their chapter
              that
              > are emblazoned on their clothing. It seems that status within this
              > group is determined by the extent to which an individual's clothing
              > goes to match this ideal outfit.
              > By definition, frat boys of Duke are often seen together at
              > social occasions known as frat parties. Here they formalize their
              > appearance by wearing their same loafers, khaki pants, pastel-
              colored
              > dress shirt, bright tie, and navy (for the conservative, but also
              > found in a variety of other colors) blazer. This is the time when
              > they are also most likely to be attempting to attract women.
              Combined
              > with their attire, confident personality, and a drink in each hand
              > (one for themselves and one for the intended recipient of their
              > attentions), they dazzle her befuddled brain with the colorful
              > exhibition of a strutting peacock.
              > This all, of course, is only my own biased opinion, and I would
              > love to hear from everyone else their own experiences with the
              group.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --
              > ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer, Professor and Chair
              > of the Theatre Department of the University of Alaska Fairbanks
              > Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://costumes.org
              > Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • jordana
              ... called bow-heads for their huge clip on hair bows) in the mid 1980s at UGA. They made a delightfully colorful sight which was forever amusing to watch.
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 26, 2006
                --- In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, Tara Maginnis
                <thecostumersmanifesto@y...> wrote:
                >
                > We had similar Frat Boys, and their female equivalents (which we
                called "bow-heads" for their huge clip on hair bows) in the mid 1980s
                at UGA. They made a delightfully colorful sight which was forever
                amusing to watch.


                I started college in the mid-nineties, and I remember watching the
                frat boys and sorority girls transition away from the Greek letter
                clothing (I remember the girls would wear tees or sweatshirts with the
                letters done in tartan applique, and either a matching hair ornament
                and light blue jeans, or matching boxer shorts in hot weather, and
                always with scrunch socks and white Keds sneakers). It was around the
                first Lollapalooza concert, "alternative music" was becoming more
                mainstream, and all of a sudden, it was like someone flipped a switch.
                Overnight, all the frat boys were wearing shirts with band logos, and
                everyone was getting "tribal" tattoos and piercings and ripping their
                jeans. And those applique shirts were relegated to alumni and moms.
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