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Assignment 8 this is about a dress I found with minks attached to botto

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  • alformeldia
    Alicia Alformeldia March 24, 2003 ASSIGNMENT 8 Is This A Dress I am enrolled in Fashion Merchandising at LA tech. Our merchandising department has its own
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 26, 2003
      Alicia
      Alformeldia
      March 24, 2003
      ASSIGNMENT 8

      Is This A Dress

      I am enrolled in Fashion Merchandising at LA tech. Our merchandising
      department has its own historical costume museum. In this museum you
      will find categorized garments and accessories by date. In each
      closet is a different century dating back to 1800's. In one of our
      classes we were assigned to critique 3 items from the museum. This
      is when 1 student found this dress that was a "must see". It was
      different and no one had seen anything like it. It was a light green
      it felt like combination of brushed cotton and lycra. It is a mid-
      length dress with a v- neck trimmed in red satin ribbon. There are 4-
      5 minks attached to the bottom horizontally. When I say minks, yes I
      mean the animal including the head (eyes and everything). I was kind
      of scared of this. Mainly everyone laughed and thought, "who would
      ever buy a dress with those animal faces attached at the bottom".
      Nonetheless, I asked the museum director about the history of the
      dress. She informed me that a woman named Mary Lou Ledbetter of
      Ruston, LA once wore it. Mary Lou was a prominent figure in this
      small city in the 50's. The dress dates back to somewhere between
      the 40's and 50's whenever this style was "IN". This woman owned A
      dress shop on Park Avenue named "Mary Lou's". It is now called "The
      Fashion" under a separate ownership.
      It was interesting to me that this was the trend in these
      times. My mother told me her grandmother had one of these she kept
      in the closet and if they were unruly she would scare them with the
      mink garment. I will find more information about mink in the 50's in
      comparison to how it was perceived in controversial times such as the
      70's.







      Results from E-bay
      I searched e bay by starting with a mink search I found many mink
      blankets and full mink coats. These coats were from the 1940's. I
      wasn't exactly finding garments with the entire mink like my study
      garment. An Example of this is site #1 at bottom of page. Next I
      searched "mink clothes" here I found a cape but it also was just the
      fur of the mink and did not include a head. I searched "mink
      garments", "items with mink" , "mink on dresses" no results so I went
      back to my search of "mink" and scanned over 2351 items. Scanning
      these items Ii am finding many blankets and coats, not many dresses.
      All items are generally ranging in the $40-$60 price range. I found
      a dress, which is pretty close in comparison to my study garment. I
      really like this dress b/c it is unique and it incorporates chiffon,
      velvet, and mink. It is from 1920's and you will not find many like
      this one. The starting bid was $26, but I think that is b/c not many
      have found it. I think it would just be a unique item to display in
      a room or clothing store.
      I learned that there is not a huge demand for items with mink
      fur at this time. The items that are mostly made are coats and
      blankets. Some mink jackets were set for bidding at 1000 dollars. I
      still could not find a garment like mine though. I will have
      pictures of my garment ready for assignment 11.







      Site 1
      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
      ViewItem&item=2820115768&category=15786

      THIS IS A MINK JACKET I FOUND FROM THE SITE LISTED ABOVE



      Site2
      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
      ViewItem&item=2818901648&category=1063

      Up for auction is this beautiful mink cape. It wraps around the
      shoulders, has open slits on the side for your arms, collar, pocket
      on each side and brown satin lining.


      Site 3

      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
      ViewItem&item=3215262706&category=13945
      This is a Hello Kitty twin/full blanket made of crushed Korean mink
      <IMG


      Site4 THIS IS THE CLOSEST THING I FOUND TO MY STUDY GARMENT
      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
      ViewItem&item=2818974272&category=20302

      Great 1920's dress for you today. Dark blue silk chiffon with multi-
      colored cut velvet designs, trimmed in blue smooth silk and topped
      off with mink trim at the sleeves, waist, and skirt hem, very whimsy!
      This closes in the back with snaps and is otherwise loose.



      Site 5
      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
      ViewItem&item=2819055530&category=20983
      Fabulous mink shoulder wrap, consisting of 3 pelts, all in excellent
      condition and are pinned together. 0 Fur is shiny and no dryness at
      all. Looks almost like new. Has a crocheted snaps and a crocheted
      covered hook
      []
      []
    • parsnips.1
      Hi Alicia, I don t recall seeing any dresses trimmed with the minks (I always thought they were foxes) but woman used them on coats and suits in the late 50 s
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 26, 2003
        Hi Alicia,
        I don't recall seeing any dresses trimmed with the minks (I always thought
        they were foxes) but woman used them on coats and suits in the late 50's
        through maybe the late 60's (this was in Philadelphia). It may not have
        been the latest trend at that point, but my grandmother would have spent a
        good deal on a coat such as that and a good coat was expected to last 10
        years or so. I remember my grandmother having a either a stole that was
        worn with a winter coat or else it was attached like a fur collar. And they
        wouldn't have been nearly as intriguing without the beady little eyes! I
        couldn't wait until I was old enough to get one (I never did)
        Pat

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "alformeldia" <playgirl4sheezy@...>
        To: <CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2003 9:44 PM
        Subject: [CostumeHistoryClass] Assignment 8 this is about a dress I found
        with minks attached to botto


        > Alicia
        > Alformeldia
        > March 24, 2003
        > ASSIGNMENT 8
        >
        > Is This A Dress
        >
        > I am enrolled in Fashion Merchandising at LA tech. Our merchandising
        > department has its own historical costume museum. In this museum you
        > will find categorized garments and accessories by date. In each
        > closet is a different century dating back to 1800's. In one of our
        > classes we were assigned to critique 3 items from the museum. This
        > is when 1 student found this dress that was a "must see". It was
        > different and no one had seen anything like it. It was a light green
        > it felt like combination of brushed cotton and lycra. It is a mid-
        > length dress with a v- neck trimmed in red satin ribbon. There are 4-
        > 5 minks attached to the bottom horizontally. When I say minks, yes I
        > mean the animal including the head (eyes and everything). I
      • Tara Maginnis
        parsnips.1 wrote: I remember my grandmother having a either a stole that ... Yes, I too had a childlike fascination with the beady eyes. A friend in the
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 26, 2003
          "parsnips.1" wrote:
          I remember my grandmother having a either a stole that
          > was
          > worn with a winter coat or else it was attached like a fur collar.
          > And they
          > wouldn't have been nearly as intriguing without the beady little eyes!

          Yes, I too had a childlike fascination with the beady eyes. A friend in
          the 1960's had a fur piece made from four summer weasels that had been
          her grandmothers which we played with as a sort of group of stuffed
          animals all tied together. I remember they all had names.

          When we did The Importance of Being Earnest at UAF we replaced the black
          bead eyes on the double fox white stole that lady Bracknell wore with
          big twinkly red faceted bead eyes that looked even more creepy.

          As an adult I like those beady eyed fur pieces for stage, firstly
          because they look like a goofy fancy period fur piece without my having
          to stick some poor actor in a hot fur coat, two, because a good actor
          can fling them over their shoulders, play with them, and come up will
          all sorts of good stage business with them, three because they don't
          really perform much function if released into the real world (a fur or
          fake fur coat on the other hand can be quite handy for folks in
          Fairbanks, as well as taking 4-5 times as much storage space), and,
          four, are nearly all old things that were hunted or farmed usually
          before our actors were born, so they won't feel guilty, five, they don't
          usually require as much maintenance to hold together as an old fur coat
          often does.

          --
          ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer & Associate Professor
          of the Theatre Department of the University of Alaska Fairbanks
          Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://costumes.org
          Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
        • parsnips.1
          Right now I think the creepiest part about these things is those dried up little paws; however, red beads for the eyes is the perfect *touch*. These are all
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 27, 2003
            Right now I think the creepiest part about these things is those dried up
            little paws; however, red beads for the eyes is the perfect *touch*.

            These are all excellent reasons for using these pelts instead of a coat or
            full stole, but do you or anyone know who/when/why fur pieces with all the
            parts still attached came about. I could only find general information on
            the wearing of furs for warmth or to indicate wealth and power. I found one
            source that showed this style fur being worn in 1906 (women), but there
            wasn't any specific info with the drawing. Did leaving the parts on have
            any significance?
            Pat

            >.......fox white stole that lady Bracknell wore with
            > big twinkly red faceted bead eyes that looked even more creepy.
            >
            > As an adult I like those beady eyed fur pieces for stage, firstly
            > because they look like a goofy fancy period fur piece without my having
            > to stick some poor actor in a hot fur coat, two, because a good actor
            > can fling them over their shoulders, play with them, and come up will
            > all sorts of good stage business with them, three because they don't
            > really perform much function if released into the real world
          • Tara Maginnis
            One first runs into pictures of dead dogs in the late 16th Century, when it was thought to be the thing to wear a single fur, with a jeweled head over one
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 28, 2003
              One first runs into pictures of "dead dogs" in the late 16th Century,
              when it was thought to be the thing to wear a single fur, with a jeweled
              head over one shoulder. see
              http://www.costumes.org/history/renaissance/boehn/jeweledweasel.jpg It
              is also said that it was thought to ward off picking up fleas from
              public places because fleas were assumed to go for the fur piece and not
              you. This might be apocryphal, but likely is true since the common
              advice on how to temporarily avoid flea problems in a home with an
              infestation was fur blankets.

              The style died out pretty fast, and really didn't start back till around
              the 1890's, not going really nuts till the early 20th century, then
              hanging around till around 1950 when it gradually expired for the next
              decade. By the 1960's it just was bad taste, where it has mostly stayed
              ever since.

              Another picture:
              A late Medieval head for a Dead Dog, from the Musee de Cluny, Paris:
              http://www.costumes.org/travel/1999uktour/disk42/Mvc-015f.jpg


              "parsnips.1" wrote:
              >
              > Right now I think the creepiest part about these things is those dried
              > up
              > little paws; however, red beads for the eyes is the perfect *touch*.
              >
              > These are all excellent reasons for using these pelts instead of a
              > coat or
              > full stole, but do you or anyone know who/when/why fur pieces with all
              > the
              > parts still attached came about. I could only find general
              > information on
              > the wearing of furs for warmth or to indicate wealth and power. I
              > found one
              > source that showed this style fur being worn in 1906 (women), but
              > there
              > wasn't any specific info with the drawing. Did leaving the parts on
              > have
              > any significance?
              > Pat
              >
              > >.......fox white stole that lady Bracknell wore with
              > > big twinkly red faceted bead eyes that looked even more creepy.
              > >
              > > As an adult I like those beady eyed fur pieces for stage, firstly
              > > because they look like a goofy fancy period fur piece without my
              > having
              > > to stick some poor actor in a hot fur coat, two, because a good
              > actor
              > > can fling them over their shoulders, play with them, and come up
              > will
              > > all sorts of good stage business with them, three because they don't
              > > really perform much function if released into the real world
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              > [Image]
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

              --
              ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer & Associate Professor
              of the Theatre Department of the University of Alaska Fairbanks
              Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://costumes.org
              Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
            • parsnips.1
              Thanks for the links Tara! The thought of a dead weasel (or dog) slung over my shoulder is really disgusting, LOL! I didn t think of dogs, but when I was
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 28, 2003
                Thanks for the links Tara! The thought of a dead weasel (or dog) slung over
                my shoulder is really disgusting, LOL! I didn't think of dogs, but when I
                was researching last night I did come across a photo of a Cretan *snake
                goddess* statuette (the frontispiece of Kohler's History of Costume) and she
                has what appears to be a live dog-like creature perched on her head. There's
                no mention of the dog in the description given, so not sure what the
                significance is or what i really might be.
                Pat

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Tara Maginnis" <Tara@...>
                To: <CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, March 28, 2003 3:53 AM
                Subject: Re: [CostumeHistoryClass] Assignment 8 this is about a dress I
                found with minks attached to botto


                > One first runs into pictures of "dead dogs" in the late 16th Century,
                > when it was thought to be the thing to wear a single fur, with a jeweled
                > head over one shoulder. see
                > http://www.costumes.org/history/renaissance/boehn/jeweledweasel.jpg It
                > is also said that it was thought to ward off picking up fleas from
                > public places because fleas were assumed to go for the fur piece and not
                > you. This might be apocryphal, but likely is true since the common
                > advice on how to temporarily avoid flea problems in a home with an
                > infestation was fur blankets.
                >
                > The style died out pretty fast, and really didn't start back till around
                > the 1890's, not going really nuts till the early 20th century, then
                > hanging around till around 1950 when it gradually expired for the next
                > decade. By the 1960's it just was bad taste, where it has mostly stayed
                > ever since.
                >
                > Another picture:
                > A late Medieval head for a Dead Dog, from the Musee de Cluny, Paris:
                > http://www.costumes.org/travel/1999uktour/disk42/Mvc-015f.jpg
                >
                >
                > "parsnips.1" wrote:
                > >
                > > Right now I think the creepiest part about these things is those dried
                > > up
                > > little paws; however, red beads for the eyes is the perfect *touch*.
                > >
                > > These are all excellent reasons for using these pelts instead of a
                > > coat or
                > > full stole, but do you or anyone know who/when/why fur pieces with all
                > > the
                > > parts still attached came about. I could only find general
                > > information on
                > > the wearing of furs for warmth or to indicate wealth and power. I
                > > found one
                > > source that showed this style fur being worn in 1906 (women), but
                > > there
                > > wasn't any specific info with the drawing. Did leaving the parts on
                > > have
                > > any significance?
                > > Pat
                > >
                > > >.......fox white stole that lady Bracknell wore with
                > > > big twinkly red faceted bead eyes that looked even more creepy.
                > > >
                > > > As an adult I like those beady eyed fur pieces for stage, firstly
                > > > because they look like a goofy fancy period fur piece without my
                > > having
                > > > to stick some poor actor in a hot fur coat, two, because a good
                > > actor
                > > > can fling them over their shoulders, play with them, and come up
                > > will
                > > > all sorts of good stage business with them, three because they don't
                > > > really perform much function if released into the real world
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                > > [Image]
                > >
                > >
                > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                > >
                > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                >
                > --
                > ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer & Associate Professor
                > of the Theatre Department of the University of Alaska Fairbanks
                > Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://costumes.org
                > Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
                >
                >
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >
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