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  • Tara Maginnis
    AT THE MUSEUM AT FIT __________________________________________________________ Fall Events Email * October 28, 2002 FALL EXHIBITIONS
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 30, 2002
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      AT THE MUSEUM AT FIT

      __________________________________________________________
      Fall Events Email * October
      28, 2002


      FALL EXHIBITIONS
      ********************

      * RECENTLY OPENED *

      ~Scaasi: Exuberant Fashion~
      October 15, 2002 through January 4, 2003

      Arnold Scaasi is known for designing beautiful
      dresses for celebrities and other notable women. His
      clients have included First Lady Barbara Bush,
      Elizabeth Taylor, Ivana and Blaine Trump, Joan
      Rivers, and Barbara Walters. On view are over 140
      evening gowns and cocktail dresses, evoking the
      elegance of a past era. Scaasi's work was
      influenced by the couturier Charles James, with whom he
      apprenticed in the 1950s, and is characterized by
      dresses with a defined bustline and low décolletage,
      off-the-shoulder necklines, and strapless dresses.
      Definitely not a minimalist, he made garments of
      rich fabrics, opulently adorned. The exhibition is
      curated by Ellen Shanley, curator of costume, The
      Museum at FIT.

      Image Credit: Arnold Scaasi - Evening Dress & Coat,
      1957.


      ~Femme Fatale:
      Fashion and Visual Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Paris~
      October 22, 2002 through January 25, 2003

      The fashions of the Belle Époque have been the
      subject of many popular museum exhibitions. But
      Femme Fatale: Fashion and Visual Culture in
      Fin-de-Siècle Paris is the first exhibition to explore the
      sexual politics of women's fashion in
      turn-of-the-century Paris, when courtesans and actresses set
      the latest styles. Through a selection of more 30
      haute couture dresses, teagowns, and other
      ensembles, the exhibition demonstrates that
      fashion contributed to a new image of femininity that was
      erotic, powerful, and modern. On view are fashions
      by Worth, Paquin, and Doucet, as well as
      works of art and accessories, such as fans,
      corsets, and Art Nouveau jewelry. The exhibition is
      curated by Valerie Steele, acting director and
      chief curator, together with Fred Dennis, associate
      curator of costume. A related symposium will be held at FIT on
      January 24-25, 2003. (See "Events" below)

      Image Credit: Charles Frederick Worth - Black-and-white striped day
      dress - c. 1900 - Lent by the Museum of the City of New York - Photo
      by Irving Solero


      EVENTS
      *********

      Valerie F. Steele, Ph.D. Acting Director and Chief
      Curator of The Museum at the Fashion Institute
      of Technology will lecture on Femme Fatale:
      Fashion and Visual Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Paris at La
      Maison Française and Sotheby's.

      Paris has been the capital of fashion for
      four hundred years. Paris fashion of 1900 is the
      subject of a glamorous new exhibition
      entitled "Femme Fatale" at The Museum at the
      Fashion Institute of Technology. Although the
      fashions of the Belle Époque have been
      the subject of many museum exhibitions,
      "Femme Fatale" is the first to explore the
      sexual politics of women's fashion in
      turn-of-the-century Paris. Dr. Valerie Steele,
      acting director of the museum and curator of
      this exhibition, will talk about fashion and
      visual culture in fin-de-siècle Paris. The
      representation of femininity in
      late-nineteenth-century art and literature
      has been the focus of much recent
      scholarship. But fashion also played an
      important role in the metamorphosis of the
      modern woman. According to Steele,
      developments in fashion contributed to a new
      image of femininity that was powerful, erotic
      and modern. Although the dominant
      cultural discourse emphasized woman's role as
      wife and mother, fashion told a different
      story, as courtesans and actresses set the
      latest styles. Admittedly, there was a morbid
      quality to some visual imagery about women,
      as "decadent" artists portrayed the femme
      fleur and the femme fatale. But many
      fashionable women also embraced the sinuous
      curves of art nouveau, perceiving in the new
      style the image of empowered femininity.
      Some of the same issues recurred in 1947,
      with Christian Dior's ultra-feminine "New
      Look."

      Image Credit: Mme. Denoix - Green teagown - c. 1880 - Lent by the
      Museum of the City of New York - Photo by Irving Solero


      Tuesday, October 29 - 7:30 pm
      at La Maison Française

      This event is free and open to the public.

      Las Maison Française
      16 Washington Mews
      New York, NY 10003
      Tel: 212 998.8750
      FAX: 212 995.4142

      Just north of Washington Square, at the entrance to historic, cobble
      stoned Washington Mews, stands La Maison Française, a
      New York landmark occupying a nineteenth-century red-brick carriage
      house. Since its founding in 1957, the "French House"
      has become the most active center of French-American cultural and
      intellectual exchange to be found on any American
      campus.

      For directions or more information, visit their website at
      www.nyu.edu/maisonfrancaise or email them at maison.francaise@...
      Image Credit: George de Feure - Illustration - c. 1900 - Private
      Collection


      Tuesday, December 17 - 4:30 pm
      Lecture & Panel Discussion at Sotheby's

      Lecture: 4:30 pm
      Reception: 5:30 pm
      Fee: $25



      Sotheby's
      1334 York Avenue
      New York, NY

      For more information or to register in advance, please phone 212
      894.1111 or email publicprograms@...
      Image Credit: Charles Frederick Worth - Red evening dress - c. 1885 -
      Lent by the Museum of the City of New York - Photo by Irving Solero


      ~Femme Fatale Symposium~
      Friday, January 24 and Saturday, January 25, 2003
      Fashion Institute of Technology, Haft Auditorium,
      Seventh Avenue at 27th Street
      Admission is $10; free for FIT students and faculty.

      The Museum at FIT will present Femme Fatale: Fashion
      and Visual Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Paris, a
      two-day symposium on fashion and the femme fatale in
      Belle Époque Paris.

      Bringing together a group of internationally renowned
      scholars, the conference will include diverse
      lectures on such topics as John Singer Sargent's
      notorious Madame X, how fashion contributed to the
      formation of the modern woman, and the sexual politics of women's
      fashion in the late 19th century.

      SPEAKERS:
      · Emily Apter, professor of French at New York University and author
      of Feminizing the Fetish will speak about "The
      Weaponized Woman: Rachilde's Lethal Amazon, La Marquise de Sade"

      · Hollis Clayson, associate professor of art history at Northwestern
      University and author of Painted Love will speak on the
      topic "Vulgarians in Paris: Prostitutes and American Women on the
      Town"

      · Deborah Davis, author and historian, will discuss her forthcoming
      book Strapless: Madame X and the Scandal that Shocked
      Belle Époque Paris

      · Rae Beth Gordon, author of Ornament, Fantasy, and Desire in
      Nineteenth-Century French Literature will speak on the topic
      "Fashion and the White Savage in the Parisian Music Hall"

      · Linda Nochlin, professor of art at the Institute of Fine Arts of New
      York University and author of Women, Art and Power
      and Other Essays

      · Bruno Remaury, research director of the Institut Français de la Mode
      and author of Le Beau Sexe Faible, will present
      "Between Beauty, Illness and Death: Physiological Aspects of the Femme
      Fatale in Cultural Representations of Femininity"

      · Debora Silverman, associate professor of history at UCLA and author
      of Art Nouveau in Fin-de-Siècle France

      · Valerie Steele, acting director and chief curator of The Museum at
      FIT, author of Paris Fashion, and editor of Fashion Theory:
      The Journal of Dress, Body, and Culture, will speak about FIT's museum
      exhibition of the femme fatale

      · Nancy Troy, professor of art history at the University of Southern
      California and author of Modernism and the Decorative
      Arts in France, will discuss her forthcoming book, Couture Culture: A
      Study in Modern Art and Fashion

      · Barbara Vinken, professor of French literature at Hamburg University
      and author of Mode nach der Mode

      For more information, contact The Museum at FIT at (212) 217-5958 or
      musinfo@....


      ~Corset Lecture~
      December 5-7, 2002

      Valerie Steele speaks at New York University's Fourth Fashion
      Conference
      THE PRESENCE OF THE PAST: REUSE, REVIVAL, AND RENEWAL IN FASHION

      For more information or to register, please contact: Programs in the
      Arts, New York University/SCPS at 212-998-7130 or
      via fax at 212-995-4293; you may also access the conference brochure
      and register on-line at www.scps.nyu.edu/arts. The
      registration fee is $335 with an additional $20 registration fee.


      * OPENING SOON *

      ~Designing Forward~
      November 11, 2002 through November 30, 2002

      Interior design senior thesis projects of the Class of 2002.


      ~27 on 7~
      December 10, 2002 through December 14, 2002

      An exhibition of portfolios and other works by graduating students in
      the Art Specialization of the Fashion Design Program.
      The art specialization furthers design development on paper as well as
      presentation skills. A designer oversees a special
      project and an outstanding student is chosen to receive the critic's
      award. The show is organized by program coordinators
      Linda Tain and Stephen Stipelman


      ~Fashion, Italian Style~
      February 11, 2003 through April 12, 2003

      The Museum at FIT will dedicate the entire museum to
      celebrate Italian style with an exhibition featuring
      more than 110 objects ranging from high fashion
      couture to modern furniture. Virtually every
      geographical region is known for one or more fashion
      specialties including textiles, accessories, couture,
      eyewear, jewelry, and men's and women's
      ready-to-wear. The exhibition will draw on the collections of
      some of Italy's top designers as well as museum and
      private collections in the New York area.

      From Armani to Versace, every noted Italian designer will be
      represented. The exhibition will be curated by Valerie Steele,
      acting director and chief curator of The Museum at FIT.
      Image Credit: Roberta Di Camerino - Evening dress in gray, white and
      black jersey - c. 1970 - Gift in memory of Susan Engel Levy - Photo by
      Irving Solero


      MUSEUM INFORMATION
      **************************

      The Museum is open to the public free of charge,
      Tuesday - Friday, Noon - 8pm, and Saturday 10 am - 5pm.

      Located on the Southwest corner of Seventh Avenue at 27th Street in
      New York City, the museum can be reached by
      subway:
      1, 9, C, E, F, N, or R, and
      by bus: M10.
      Penn Station is close by at
      31st Street for the Long
      Island Railroad, New
      Jersey Transit, and Amtrak.

      For more information, be sure to visit our website at
      http://www.fitnyc.suny.edu/museum or phone our
      information line at 212.217.5800


      The mission of The Museum at FIT is to document and
      explicate the
      concepts of fashion and style throughout history and
      across all
      levels of society. Founded in 1967 to support the academic
      programs of the Fashion Institute of Technology, The
      Museum at
      FIT is the repository for one of the largest collections
      of costume
      and textiles in the world, which it preserves for both
      study and
      exhibition purposes. The museum is committed to sharing these
      resources with
      the general public, with professionals in the design fields as well
      as with the
      students and faculty of FIT. The museum programs explore the design
      process
      and nurture student creativity through its exhibitions and the use of
      its
      collections.


      Updates on upcoming exhibitions and events will be emailed
      periodically.
      ~If you know someone who would like to receive this events email,
      please type "subscribe" in the subject line, include the email
      address in the body, and reply to musinfo@....
      ~If you would no longer like to receive this events email, please
      reply by typing "remove" in the subject line.

      --
      Tamsen Schwartzman
      Museum Information Coordinator
      The Museum at FIT
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