Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Assignment 1

Expand Messages
  • Sandy Snowden
    Assignment 1 Sandy Snowden 24 January 2001 An Indian Community Association meets in our local community centre. The various ways they
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 24, 2001
      Assignment 1 Sandy Snowden 24 January 2001

      An Indian Community Association meets in our local community centre.
      The various ways they dress and decorate themselves is interesting,
      especially since many members have not visited their "native"
      India,
      having been born in England. I would like to mention the ladies of
      this group.

      In everyday life, the women dress like others in this community, the
      main thing setting them apart is the hair and skin colour. They use
      make-up, and many have cut their hair. However, there are some
      exceptions, as older women and some middle age women wear long hair,
      saris and sandals. Those wearing saris do make concessions to the
      English weather with a cardigan or light coat over the sari, and
      socks with their sandals.

      When the group meets, the women identify with their group by dressing
      in saris. A Sari, is a six-metre length of cloth draped and pleated
      in the front, then tucked into the waistband of an underlying
      petticoat, the end is flung over the shoulder, displaying the pallav,
      which has intricate designs on it. It is worn with a fitted blouse,
      which shows the midriff.

      Although dress identifies the ladies as a part of a group, one can
      see differences in financial status, marital state, and individual
      taste. Some women adorn themselves with gold bangles and jewellery
      and wear saris that are highly decorated with embroidery, often gold.
      But many ladies actually wear a version of the sari that is gathered
      at the waist, and has an attached length that is thrown over the
      shoulder. It is easier to put on and less costly. Some of the women
      wear bright saris in colour combinations such as hot pink and orange.
      However, some of the older, and perhaps some of the less well off
      women, dress in much plainer coloured costumes, and rely on cheap
      bangles. The married ladies have a tilak mark on their foreheads,
      and some of them also wear a scarf or shawl of thin material over
      their hair.

      The sari itself draws attraction with its long flowing skirt. The
      short-sleeved midriff blouse has a deep neckline, and although draped
      over the front by the pallay, allows glimpses of the skin at the back
      and sides. It is very form fitting, causing all figures look
      attractive. The pallay itself, with its eye-catching embroidery,
      actually draws attention to the upper body, and the figure it is
      covering.

      At special or religious occasions, the women wear their best saris.
      They wear even more bangles and rings. Those participating in the
      special dances, wear bracelets and anklets with bells. They spend
      time beforehand decorating hands and feet with henna in traditional
      mehndi patterns. For weddings, brides also have special henna
      patterns drawn across their foreheads. A bride whose family has
      little money wears her mehndi in place of ornate gold jewellery.

      Even with these traditional links to India, some incidents suggest
      that details may be less important in this country. One example was
      noted when several ladies were scheduled to do a special dance for
      the local community. They wore no mehndi designs, although there was
      a booth for interested visitors. Just as they prepared for the dance,
      with the bells and bangles, one of them took a permanent red marker
      and drew a rather wobbly line around each lady's foot! It did not
      look as attractive as the mehndi, but none of them seemed embarrassed
      or surprised by it.
    • Shanghai Lil
      INTRO I have just spent a month living with the senior law women in the aboriginal community of Balgo in the Great Sandy Desert, one of the most remote
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 25, 2001
        INTRO
        I have just spent a month living with the senior law women in the
        aboriginal community of Balgo in the Great Sandy Desert, one of the
        most remote indigenous communities in Australia. About 800 people live
        there with some living in outstations and the community has had only
        recent contact (1968) with the white community when they began to come
        out of the desert in small family groups due to drought.

        The aboriginal group on the web page are unlikely to be re-enactors.
        Aboriginal culture and practice is still very strong in most of
        Australia, even within urban based aboriginal population. The last re-
        enactors would have been in films made during the '30s when aborigines
        were represented on stage and screen by Europeans in 'blackface' and
        one short period in the '50s when Queen Elizabeth visited.

        WHERE
        Kapululangu Womens Law and Culture Centre

        * celebrate social/religious occasions?
        Women who were mostly young teenagers "little big girl, no breasts"
        when they had first contact comment about the times when they wore no
        clothes "no shame" they explain gleefully. Today modesty very strong
        for women and not thought to be part of imposed missionary culture -
        skirts not trousers worn even for hunting and gathering bush tucker in
        spite of prickly spinifex. Thighs always hidden. Day to day clothes
        comprised of a skirt and T-shirt, sometimes a dress.

        Social occasions are traditional combined with christian for events
        such as weddings, sunday services where 'best' clothes are worn.
        Clothing items have little personal value and are often shared given
        away or left out on the clothes line until the desert wind blows them
        away. However, dress specially for church and for trips to capital
        cities when shoes are worn

        Dancing is a big part of the womens traditional community, even in non
        Law times. Someone will start singing, out will come the clap sticks -
        and off will come the T-shirts. Dancing is always barebreasted. On
        special occasions - such as my arrival - the women will paint up. This
        traditionally is red and yellow ochres in emu fat although the now
        sedentary peoples have taken on cooking oils as a medium adapting as
        they have adapted so much of the European commodities for traditional
        purposes. The breasts are painted with line patterns which they
        traditionally 'own' My sister as a kartija (whitefella) is always
        painted up with the bush tomato design - I think it relates to her
        'skin' - far too complicated a concept to go into here. (400 words???)
        With this is worn a red head band of ochred string, and occasionally
        feathers. Traditionally the string was hand spun from human hair, but
        now interchangeably with ochred red acrylic wool now even for serious
        Law times when the magic is very heavy.

        *visibly identify themselves with a group?

        Aboriginal genealogies go back generations and thus everyone is
        placeable and immediately placed. You are who you are and everyone
        knows your family and all the connections (and all the historical
        gossip), your 'skin', and where your 'country' is . You are part of a
        web of connections. Within the first hour of arrival I was
        mysteriously 'placed' and throughout the next month people would come
        up to me in the store and introduce themselves as my brother-in-law or
        my grandmother or my aunt. The only visual identification necessary
        is when there is a major Law camp for many communities and the women
        decide that for the dancing (essential in the practice of the Law)
        they will all wear black skirts, and then any strangers will know they
        are the Women from Balgo. The colour choice was a design decision, not
        predicated by tradition. And I had to sew them! They find kartija
        culture and family systems limited and incomprehensible.

        *show status within their group?

        Clothing and dress not an indicator of status. Status is standing in
        the community. Can be inherited or earned. However with the breakdown
        in cultural norms with white contact, the community today has
        fractured into three sectors -
        • the Senior Law women with whom I lived who have traditional values.
        • the Dormitory generation who have received some schooling and who
        are often highly politicised, and
        • the teenagers and young twenties

        The Dormitory generation of women seem to place no particular
        importance in clothing, although those that work in the local
        organisations - support teachers, nurses aides etc are better dressed
        but this could be a function of a better income, more travel outside
        the community and thus access to new clothes which the poorer people
        do not have.

        The teenagers are a different matter and like all teenagers,
        identifying with peer group rather than community values. This is the
        generation that grew up with schooling, modern music and TV and their
        fashion information seems to come from this source. The girls mostly
        wear skirts but there were a couple of them outrageously wearing
        jeans. When I was there there was a fashion for temporary tattoos and
        neckbands, bright green and blue nailpolish, coloured hair. There is
        no European rite of passage nonsense about you are not old enough -
        all these fashions are worn by teenagers and younger even down to the
        age of seven or eight. Trends seem to be set by the first one to
        acquire the new artefact from outside. Then they all want it. I hope
        to gain insight into the fashion process at work here on my next trip.
        I have many questions.

        *attract persons of one's gender preference?
        The sexes are very separate traditionally and this persists. I
        attended a disco and saw young people bopping in groups of five or
        six, but all of the same sex. Acknowledged couples sometimes danced as
        a two some. The boys were peacocks - bright colours, tight jeans,
        American football T-shirts, hair slicked, baseball caps back to front.
        The girls did not appear to be dressed specially - just whatever they
        had been wearing all day (some wore lipstick) but I think this was a
        passive behaviour thing as young women behave very modestly in
        relation to the boys they grew up with once they reach a certain age.
        Show off solo dancing was also part of the boys display for the girls.
        Their breakdancing was a combination of what they had picked up from
        TV and traditional dance steps, after which the dancer would retire in
        false confusion. Only the preadolescent girls participated in this
        solo dancing, very campy and blatantly sexy.

        *express individual taste?

        These senior women are all artists, some selling their beautiful dot
        paintings telling their traditional stories for thousands of dollars
        in galleries throughout the world. I am very interested in their
        clothing aesthetics and values as pattern clashes with pattern and any
        colour coordination seems to be an accident, so spent some time
        observing the selection process in their clothing purchases.

        Clothing is mostly chosen from boxes of second hand clothes sent up by
        charities Obviously from the amount of time spent in selection, some
        aesthetic judgements were being made at purchase time. However,
        clothing is never modified, and quite often given away after purchase
        apparently at whim.

        My senior women seemed to prefer brightly coloured 'primitive' prints
        for skirts and as a second choice, florals, plus T-shirts bearing
        logos and brand names. One woman bought a matching skirt and shirt
        outfit to wear "in London" next year and another bought court shoes a
        size too small because she liked them.

        I would like to have seen the fashion driven young ones selecting
        clothing from this same source, but perhaps next time. Their sartorial
        response to global communications in their traditional and very remote
        community would make a truly interesting study and I am sure that I
        would recognise evidence of individual taste and expression in this
        culture group which is not so opaque as the women who have grew up
        living the truly traditional life.

        Shanghai Lil
      • jlc5f@virginia.edu
        I really enjoyed your essay on the aboriginal women ... what are Law times ? Can it be any time a serious question must be decided, or are there specific
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 26, 2001
          I really enjoyed your essay on the aboriginal women ... what are "Law
          times"? Can it be any time a serious question must be decided, or
          are there specific times set aside for Law? -- Jean

          > Law times. Someone will start singing, out will come the clap
          sticks -
          > and off will come the T-shirts. Dancing is always barebreasted. On
          > special occasions - such as my arrival - the women will paint up.
          This
          > traditionally is red and yellow ochres in emu fat although the now
          > sedentary peoples have taken on cooking oils as a medium adapting
          as
          > they have adapted so much of the European commodities for
          traditional
          > purposes. The breasts are painted with line patterns which they
          > traditionally 'own' My sister as a kartija (whitefella) is always
          > painted up with the bush tomato design - I think it relates to her
          > 'skin' - far too complicated a concept to go into here. (400
          words???)
          > With this is worn a red head band of ochred string, and
          occasionally
          > feathers. Traditionally the string was hand spun from human hair,
          but
          > now interchangeably with ochred red acrylic wool now even for
          serious
          > Law times when the magic is very heavy.
        • erossi@nmu.edu
          After much thought, I have decided to write about an individual whose clothing certainly expresses personal taste, and is occasionally used to celebrate social
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 26, 2001
            After much thought, I have decided to write about an individual whose
            clothing certainly expresses personal taste, and is occasionally used
            to celebrate social events. Perhaps the deciding factor in my choice
            of subject is its close proximity; I have decided to write about my
            roommate, Andrea.
            Andrea doesn't own a coat. This would not be very interesting were it
            not for the fact that we live in Marquette, Michigan, where winter
            wind chills numb fingers in minutes and seem to find their way into
            even the warmest of ensembles. Please do not begin to pity my
            impoverished roommate or start a fund with which to buy her a winter
            jacket. Andrea could easily own a coat—she chooses to go coatless
            because she doesn't like them. Of course, measures must be taken to
            ensure that one can go outdoors without a coat without becoming a
            human Klondike. Andrea is a master of the art of layering. A typical
            Andrea composition of layers may consist of a tight tank top,
            Carhartts, a zip-up wicking turtleneck, a skirt made of flannel or
            wool, and one or two sweaters, depending on temperatures.
            The inclusion of the skirt in addition to the pants is important to
            note. Andrea is a great wearer of skirts (not for any religious
            reason, unless the Wearing of Skirts itself may be considered a
            religion), and often employs her layering skills in this area. The
            skirt-over-pants combination is common, and one or two skirts may be
            topped off with a summer dress over a long underwear top.
            Since we are on the topic of skirts and dresses, some attention must
            be given to the idea of "dressing up." On certain occasions, such
            as "Nori night" or "Pancake Parties," or for no particular reason at
            all, Andrea is compelled to dress up. This can involve anything from
            the powder blue satin bridesmaid's dress she acquired this summer to
            something pulled from my closet or that of our other roommate,
            Cricket. A recent addition to the dressing up ritual is hanging a
            false earring on her septum (she says she likes the way it looks but
            has no desire to pierce her nose after seeing mine pierced).
            Four hundred words aren't nearly enough to describe the elements
            which compose the style of Andrea. I have yet to describe the
            evolution of unmatched socks, nor to elaborate on the increasingly
            constant wearing of slippers. I hope, however, that I was able to
            give you all a sense of what fun it is to watch Andrea dress.
          • julia.greger@faidor.de
            ... whose ... used ... choice ... it ... winter ... typical ... be ... must ... at ... from ... to ... but
            Message 5 of 16 , Jan 28, 2001
              --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., erossi@n... wrote:
              > After much thought, I have decided to write about an individual
              whose
              > clothing certainly expresses personal taste, and is occasionally
              used
              > to celebrate social events. Perhaps the deciding factor in my
              choice
              > of subject is its close proximity; I have decided to write about my
              > roommate, Andrea.
              > Andrea doesn't own a coat. This would not be very interesting were
              it
              > not for the fact that we live in Marquette, Michigan, where winter
              > wind chills numb fingers in minutes and seem to find their way into
              > even the warmest of ensembles. Please do not begin to pity my
              > impoverished roommate or start a fund with which to buy her a
              winter
              > jacket. Andrea could easily own a coat—she chooses to go coatless
              > because she doesn't like them. Of course, measures must be taken to
              > ensure that one can go outdoors without a coat without becoming a
              > human Klondike. Andrea is a master of the art of layering. A
              typical
              > Andrea composition of layers may consist of a tight tank top,
              > Carhartts, a zip-up wicking turtleneck, a skirt made of flannel or
              > wool, and one or two sweaters, depending on temperatures.
              > The inclusion of the skirt in addition to the pants is important to
              > note. Andrea is a great wearer of skirts (not for any religious
              > reason, unless the Wearing of Skirts itself may be considered a
              > religion), and often employs her layering skills in this area. The
              > skirt-over-pants combination is common, and one or two skirts may
              be
              > topped off with a summer dress over a long underwear top.
              > Since we are on the topic of skirts and dresses, some attention
              must
              > be given to the idea of "dressing up." On certain occasions, such
              > as "Nori night" or "Pancake Parties," or for no particular reason
              at
              > all, Andrea is compelled to dress up. This can involve anything
              from
              > the powder blue satin bridesmaid's dress she acquired this summer
              to
              > something pulled from my closet or that of our other roommate,
              > Cricket. A recent addition to the dressing up ritual is hanging a
              > false earring on her septum (she says she likes the way it looks
              but
              > has no desire to pierce her nose after seeing mine pierced).
              > Four hundred words aren't nearly enough to describe the elements
              > which compose the style of Andrea. I have yet to describe the
              > evolution of unmatched socks, nor to elaborate on the increasingly
              > constant wearing of slippers. I hope, however, that I was able to
              > give you all a sense of what fun it is to watch Andrea dress.
            • Sandy Snowden
              I found the report on the girl without a coat to be quite interesting. There is an individual in our community that seems to dress in a similar way. But, it
              Message 6 of 16 , Jan 28, 2001

                I found the report on the girl without a coat to be quite interesting. There is an individual in our community that seems to dress in a similar way.

                 

                But, it also brings to mind a girl whose parents were friendly with my parents. She had dressed and behaved somewhat peculiarly through high school in New England, causing her to be a social outcast.  Some of the other kids thought it was due to her family being poor, and her parents’ beliefs.  But, rather than attempting to fit in better when she went to college, like her sisters did, she dressed in an even more unusual way. The most striking thing was that she wore a winter scarf around her head along with earmuffs,….even in the warm weather!! She said it was to keep from getting ear infections. But, as I said, she grew up in northern New England and had not had any problems with the climate there, and the college was in South Carolina! The college was one in line with her family’s beliefs, so one would have thought she would have felt more able to fit in and be accepted. However, she was a social outcast there, too.  Perhaps inwardly she was trying to keep others at a distance, no matter who they were.

                Sandy Snowden

                 

                 

              • TJTBW502@aol.com
                In a message dated 1/25/01 10:24:16 PM Eastern Standard Time, thanlon@talent.com.au writes:
                Message 7 of 16 , Jan 28, 2001
                  In a message dated 1/25/01 10:24:16 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                  thanlon@... writes:

                  << I have just spent a month living with the senior law women in the
                  aboriginal community of Balgo in the Great Sandy Desert, one of the
                  most remote indigenous communities in Australia. About 800 people live
                  there with some living in outstations and the community has had only
                  recent contact (1968) with the white community when they began to come
                  out of the desert in small family groups due to drought. >>

                  This was one of the most interesting reports I have ever read. I am really
                  going to enjoy being a part of this class, because everybody in it is from a
                  different area, bringing to the class an unusually wide range of experiences
                  and observations.
                  Jackie Wakeling
                • Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer
                  ... Chair of the Theatre Department of University of Alaska Fairbanks Website: The Costumer s Manifesto at http://www.costumes.org Theatre Department Web
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jan 29, 2001
                    > Perhaps inwardly she was trying to keep others at a distance, no
                    > matter who they were.
                    >
                    > Weird and unusual clothing has the delightful attribute of turning
                    > people "off" who object to people who have weird and unusual
                    > personalities. As a person with an odd way of thinking, I quickly
                    > figured out that dressing as I pleased very quickly made those who
                    > were conformists at heart back off, and those who were the fellow
                    > oddities group around. This saves a lot of time in relationships.
                    >
                    > ----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer/Associate Professor
                    >
                    Chair of the Theatre Department of University of Alaska Fairbanks
                    Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://www.costumes.org
                    Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
                  • Theodora
                    Hi Julia you certainly made me curious about your room mate s sense of style. It must be a fun waiting to see what she will wear next ! She sounds like an
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jan 29, 2001
                      Hi Julia
                       
                      you certainly made me curious about your room mate's sense of style. It must be a fun waiting to see what she will wear next ! She sounds like an independent and creative person - 'good on her' for not conforming to what is expected to be worn - particularly in a colder climate.
                       
                      Theodora
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Sunday, January 28, 2001 9:38 PM
                      Subject: [CostumeHistoryClass] Re: Assignment 1

                      --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., erossi@n... wrote:
                      > After much thought, I have decided to write about an individual
                      whose
                      > clothing certainly expresses personal taste, and is occasionally
                      used
                      > to celebrate social events. Perhaps the deciding factor in my
                      choice
                      > of subject is its close proximity; I have decided to write about my
                      > roommate, Andrea.
                      > Andrea doesn't own a coat. This would not be very interesting were
                      it
                      > not for the fact that we live in Marquette, Michigan, where winter
                      > wind chills numb fingers in minutes and seem to find their way into
                      > even the warmest of ensembles. Please do not begin to pity my
                      > impoverished roommate or start a fund with which to buy her a
                      winter
                      > jacket. Andrea could easily own a coat—she chooses to go coatless
                      > because she doesn't like them. Of course, measures must be taken to
                      > ensure that one can go outdoors without a coat without becoming a
                      > human Klondike. Andrea is a master of the art of layering. A
                      typical
                      > Andrea composition of layers may consist of a tight tank top,
                      > Carhartts, a zip-up wicking turtleneck, a skirt made of flannel or
                      > wool, and one or two sweaters, depending on temperatures.
                      > The inclusion of the skirt in addition to the pants is important to
                      > note. Andrea is a great wearer of skirts (not for any religious
                      > reason, unless the Wearing of Skirts itself may be considered a
                      > religion), and often employs her layering skills in this area. The
                      > skirt-over-pants combination is common, and one or two skirts may
                      be
                      > topped off with a summer dress over a long underwear top.     
                      > Since we are on the topic of skirts and dresses, some attention
                      must
                      > be given to the idea of "dressing up." On certain occasions, such
                      > as "Nori night" or "Pancake Parties," or for no particular reason
                      at
                      > all, Andrea is compelled to dress up. This can involve anything
                      from
                      > the powder blue satin bridesmaid's dress she acquired this summer
                      to
                      > something pulled from my closet or that of our other roommate,
                      > Cricket. A recent addition to the dressing up ritual is hanging a
                      > false earring on her septum (she says she likes the way it looks
                      but
                      > has no desire to pierce her nose after seeing mine pierced).
                      > Four hundred words aren't nearly enough to describe the elements
                      > which compose the style of Andrea. I have yet to describe the
                      > evolution of unmatched socks, nor to elaborate on the increasingly
                      > constant wearing of slippers. I hope, however, that I was able to
                      > give you all a sense of what fun it is to watch Andrea dress.



                      To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      CostumeHistoryClass-unsubscribe@egroups.com


                    • julia.greger@faidor.de
                      Hi Theodora, Sorry about the confusion, but the posting was from someone else. I was trying to reply to it, and I still don´t know what I´ve done wrong but
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jan 29, 2001
                        Hi Theodora,

                        Sorry about the confusion, but the posting was from someone else. I
                        was trying to reply to it, and I still don´t know what I´ve
                        done
                        wrong but the system only repeated the original message and refused
                        to add my comment, making it look like I posted the report. But I
                        fully agree with you - the description makes me want to meet that
                        person Andrea!
                        Julia

                        --- In CostumeHistoryClass@y..., "Theodora" <theodora@f...> wrote:
                        > Hi Julia
                        >
                        > you certainly made me curious about your room mate's sense of
                        style. It must be a fun waiting to see what she will wear next ! She
                        sounds like an independent and creative person - 'good on her' for
                        not conforming to what is expected to be worn - particularly in a
                        colder climate.
                        >
                        >
                      • Chris Hinkes <public@angeldeathzero.com>
                        My social group to be discussed is: GAMERS! More specifically, american gamers. This unique group of individuals actually does less focusing on how they look
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jan 27, 2003
                          My social group to be discussed is: GAMERS! More specifically,
                          american gamers. This unique group of individuals actually does
                          less focusing on how they look and being individual then most social
                          groups.
                          "Gamer" can even be broken down. The casual gamer doesn't
                          necessarily dress according to being a gamer, because they are going
                          to be part of other more influential groups as well. But, their
                          wear will probably be expressive, because gamers are usually intense
                          about what they like and they show it. They are already part of
                          a "less popular" group, so might as wear the clothes they like.
                          Now the full-time card-carrying gamer is going to have the clothes
                          to show it. Again, they don't look so much for being individual,
                          but in expressing what they like. This is many times clothes with
                          logos, sayings, or pictures of their favorite games. Another very
                          common wear is clothes, especially shirts, with anime on them. For
                          some reason, gaming and being a anime fanatic go right together.
                          Anything forign, especially Japanese, fits right in. Also, dragons
                          are very common in the gaming group.
                          Extreme gamers are usally pretty social and hang out with other
                          gamers. But then there is also the locked in their room gamer.
                          While gamer could be used for board games, war games, roleplaying
                          games, computer games, card games and more, all of them still have
                          similar traits, which is why they can be grouped into "gamer."
                          Closet gamers tend to be into computer games though, becuause that
                          requires the least amount of leaving their room. This sect of gamer
                          will wear most of the same stuff as all gamers, but they don't need
                          as much because they don't get out as much.
                          And of course being a gamer doesn't require as many clothes as other
                          groups, because it it perfectly fine to pick up a dirty shirt off
                          the floor and wear it a few more days.

                          Chris
                        • jillhazell
                          I am interested in the history of western costume because as a past student of fashion and theatre wardrobe mistress, I learned the importance of putting a
                          Message 12 of 16 , Nov 24, 2007
                            I am interested in the history of western costume because as a past
                            student of fashion and theatre wardrobe mistress, I learned the
                            importance of putting a particular style of clothing into its historical
                            and social context - something I believe I will learn on this course.
                            As it is some years since I went to college, I want to use this course
                            to refresh my memory and to pick up on the things I missed last time. I
                            have recently taken early retirement to concentrate on embroidery and am
                            particularly interested in the embellishment of clothes and in learning
                            the skills needed to recreate the embroidery for costumes from the 16th,
                            17th and 18th centuries.



                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • misswisc@aol.com
                            Welcome, Jill. I m Kristi, an IATSE stagehand and independent makeup artist. I took this class a couple of years ago to increase my knowledge of costumes.
                            Message 13 of 16 , Nov 26, 2007
                              Welcome, Jill.

                              I'm Kristi, an IATSE stagehand and independent makeup artist. I took this
                              class a couple of years ago to increase my knowledge of costumes. There's a lot
                              out there to learn about. :)

                              Kristi



                              **************************************Check out AOL's list of 2007's hottest
                              products.
                              (http://money.aol.com/special/hot-products-2007?NCID=aoltop00030000000001)


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • beatrice.harb
                              I live in Beirut, Lebanon, where the costume is very important in our society, it is a society very much based on the external look, Lebanese people do give a
                              Message 14 of 16 , Feb 8, 2013
                                I live in Beirut, Lebanon, where the costume is very important in our society, it is a society very much based on the external look, Lebanese people do give a lot of attention and time to look good, to look richer, to look sexy, to look leftist, to look like something they aim for.
                                I personally believe it is to cover up the frustration, and war memory not dealt with psychologically.
                                It is very important to always be presentable for the social statue, to be distinguished, "what if I was seen this way, what would people say?!"
                                For some conservative religious people in Lebanon the costume is different and marks them from the others. It does also make one feel and show that he belongs to one of the confessions.
                                But in general Lebanese people love to dress, follow the trends have the latest fashion. It's a way of showing that they are updated, and most important in!
                              • Janet Balk
                                What an amazing place to live! All of that history. Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                Message 15 of 16 , Feb 8, 2013
                                  What an amazing place to live! All of that history.

                                  Sent from my iPhone

                                  On Feb 8, 2013, at 6:06 AM, "beatrice.harb" <beatrice.harb@...> wrote:

                                  >
                                  > I live in Beirut, Lebanon, where the costume is very important in our society, it is a society very much based on the external look, Lebanese people do give a lot of attention and time to look good, to look richer, to look sexy, to look leftist, to look like something they aim for.
                                  > I personally believe it is to cover up the frustration, and war memory not dealt with psychologically.
                                  > It is very important to always be presentable for the social statue, to be distinguished, "what if I was seen this way, what would people say?!"
                                  > For some conservative religious people in Lebanon the costume is different and marks them from the others. It does also make one feel and show that he belongs to one of the confessions.
                                  > But in general Lebanese people love to dress, follow the trends have the latest fashion. It's a way of showing that they are updated, and most important in!
                                  >
                                  >


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • aduriaud
                                  I found this fascinating for several reasons: Your comment that some fashionable Beirutis use dressing up as an aspirational practice in order to blot out
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Nov 24, 2013

                                     I found this fascinating for several reasons:

                                     

                                    Your comment that some fashionable Beirutis use dressing up as an aspirational practice in order to blot out memories of the war was thought-provoking. In relation to that I googled Lebanese Fashion and came up with this link (below). In the article several designers discuss how wartime conditions have forced them to become resourceful in the production of their work, which I thought was another aspect of the connection you made between Beirut's history and love of fashion.

                                     

                                    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/24/fashion/Beirut-Where-Fashion-Lives-Dangerously.html

                                     

                                    Also, I noted in the article that several of the designers mentioned including Elie Saab, make a significant portion of their profit by selling to women in Gulf states. I spent a significant part of my childhood in Bahrain and this reminded me of how many of the wealthier women there venerated haute couture fashion, especially anything bling. It wasn't uncommon to see beautiful, sparkling shoes and hems of designer dresses peeking out from under their abayas. As a child this was magical!

                                     

                                    I checked out Elie Saab's website to watch footage of her latest runway shows and also found this article (link below) to an interview with a Pakistani woman based in Qatar.

                                     

                                     
                                    Amazing how discussions on fashion can touch on so many areas including history, autobiography and memory, and migrating cultural influences.

                                     

                                    ---In CostumeHistoryClass@yahoogroups.com, <beatrice.harb@...> wrote:

                                    I live in Beirut, Lebanon, where the costume is very important in our society, it is a society very much based on the external look, Lebanese people do give a lot of attention and time to look good, to look richer, to look sexy, to look leftist, to look like something they aim for.
                                    I personally believe it is to cover up the frustration, and war memory not dealt with psychologically.
                                    It is very important to always be presentable for the social statue, to be distinguished, "what if I was seen this way, what would people say?!"
                                    For some conservative religious people in Lebanon the costume is different and marks them from the others. It does also make one feel and show that he belongs to one of the confessions.
                                    But in general Lebanese people love to dress, follow the trends have the latest fashion. It's a way of showing that they are updated, and most important in!
                                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.