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mercury

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  • bmosesiii@aol.com
    sheri, YES---the people are well aware that mercury poisioning will surely kill them, just like snake handlers and the kids who blow fire out of their mouths
    Message 1 of 7 , May 30, 2002
      sheri, YES---the people are well aware that mercury poisioning will surely kill them, just like snake handlers and the kids who blow fire out of their mouths at the stop lights. most of the crummy ocupations of the world are taken by people with only one option----die now from starvation or die later from having a job you know is going to kill you----great choice, huh moses
    • yorkielaw@aol.com
      In a message dated 5/30/02 9:53:02 AM Central Daylight Time, ... The difference here seems to be that they are not only killing themselves, but endangering
      Message 2 of 7 , May 30, 2002
        In a message dated 5/30/02 9:53:02 AM Central Daylight Time,
        bmosesiii@... writes:


        >

        The difference here seems to be that they are not only killing themselves,
        but endangering others as well. The mercury in the water gets into the fish
        and other wildlife in the streams and rivers. It can harm all who have
        contact with the water. There are many safer ways to extract gold from the
        soil and riverbeds. Just look at Alaska, for example, where use of mercury
        is banned.

        I still remember the old mercury thermometers my mom used when I was a kid.
        I used to routinely break them on purpose to play with the mercury. Hmmm,
        maybe that explains a few things. . . . Pat R.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Roy Lent
        For those speaking on using mercury to extract gold: Mercury is a chemically active metal, one of two that is liquid at around room temperature. (The other
        Message 3 of 7 , May 30, 2002
          For those speaking on using mercury to extract gold:

          Mercury is a chemically active metal, one of two that is
          liquid at around room temperature. (The other being
          cesium.) It is a good solvent for a number of other metals,
          gold being among them.

          I have seen people in the Osa working the beaches for gold.
          They scoop up the superficial black deposits of magnetite,
          dry it and pour it on mercury in a tin can and stir. The
          magnetite (actually an ore of iron) just floats but the
          gold dissolves. The remaining magnetite is scooped off and
          discarded far from the beach. This is repeated hundreds of
          times until the mercury begins to become like a thick
          sludge because so much gold is dissolved in it. Then the
          tin can is put over a wood fire to boil off the mercury.
          This is the worse part as the fumes are deadly poisonous
          and the mercury is put into the environment in the worst
          possible way.

          Even economically this process makes no sense as mercury is
          very expensive and all is lost to the air. The amusing part
          of this is that it is quite possible to use mercury in a
          closed cycle operation to extract gold in an
          environmentally friendly system but the equipment would not
          only be expensive but would take technical know how and
          patience to run. Present day mercury extractors are hardly
          the most intelligent of people.

          Instead of the world moaning and groaning about open-air
          mercury extraction of gold, just finance the invention of
          somewhat less expensive, easy to use, environmentally
          friendly equipment and poof, the problem is solved. How?
          Perhaps a grease/detergent system could be worked up. (Gold
          has a great affinity for grease!)

          By the way, I still have a little can of mercury left over
          from my young idiotic days! But what to do with it? Can�t
          just throw it away! If I sell it for salvage, it will just
          go into the hands of the gold diggers and thus into the
          atmosphere. Just keep it until the end of time, I guess!



          ___________________________________

          If you think before you speak, the other fellow gets his joke in first.
          http://www.theabsolute.net/minefield/

          Roy Lent
        • olamoree
          If the yokels in Kentucky can make a simple still for condensing their moonshine, then the yokels boiling gold laden mercury can use the same SIMPLE
          Message 4 of 7 , May 31, 2002
            If the yokels in Kentucky can make a simple "still" for condensing
            their moonshine, then the yokels boiling gold laden mercury can use
            the same SIMPLE condenser to not only prevent some atmospheric
            contamination, but also to recover their expensive mercury in a
            process that is NOT expensive. It's the old question of, "I don't
            care. 'Porta me!" In the "old days" in SouthAfrican gold mines, the
            owners used to cut open the heels of their workers and drain off the
            mercury that they had inhaled and it condensed (even in human flesh!)
            and migrated, with the help of gravity, to their feet/heels. Cyanide
            extraction of gold is also ecologically insane, as applied here.
            What ever happened to the simple sluce box? I still have mine.

            Ali



            --- In CostaRicaLiving@y..., "Roy Lent" <r@r...> wrote:
            > For those speaking on using mercury to extract gold:
          • olamoree
            If the yokels in Kentucky can make a simple still for condensing their moonshine, then the yokels boiling gold laden mercury can use the same SIMPLE
            Message 5 of 7 , May 31, 2002
              If the yokels in Kentucky can make a simple "still" for condensing
              their moonshine, then the yokels boiling gold laden mercury can use
              the same SIMPLE condenser to not only prevent some atmospheric
              contamination, but also to recover their expensive mercury in a
              process that is NOT expensive. It's the old question of, "I don't
              care. 'Porta me!" In the "old days" in SouthAfrican gold mines, the
              owners used to cut open the heels of their workers and drain off the
              mercury that they had inhaled and it condensed (even in human flesh!)
              and migrated, with the help of gravity, to their feet/heels. Cyanide
              extraction of gold is also ecologically insane, as applied here.
              What ever happened to the simple sluce box? I still have mine.

              Ali



              --- In CostaRicaLiving@y..., "Roy Lent" <r@r...> wrote:
              > For those speaking on using mercury to extract gold:
            • Roy Lent
              From: olamoree ... ____________________________________ You have a point, Ali. But I m talking about the wild, outside
              Message 6 of 7 , May 31, 2002
                From: "olamoree" <olamoree@...>

                > If the yokels in Kentucky can make a simple "still" for condensing
                > their moonshine, then the yokels boiling gold laden mercury can use
                > the same SIMPLE condenser to not only prevent some atmospheric
                > contamination, but also to recover their expensive mercury in a
                > process that is NOT expensive. It's the old question of, "I don't
                > care. 'Porta me!" In the "old days" in SouthAfrican gold mines, the
                > owners used to cut open the heels of their workers and drain off the
                > mercury that they had inhaled and it condensed (even in human flesh!) and
                > migrated, with the help of gravity, to their feet/heels. Cyanide
                > extraction of gold is also ecologically insane, as applied here. What
                > ever happened to the simple sluce box? I still have mine.
                >
                > Ali
                ____________________________________

                You have a point, Ali. But I'm talking about the wild,
                outside coast of the Osa in the 70's. This bare foot gold
                miner probably had a problem finding a tin can! When I
                wandered into that area, I stayed at a hut and slept on a
                board. The woman there proudly showed me some fresh fish
                for breakfast. "Want 'em fried?" "Sure," I answered. So she
                got a couple of coconuts, split them in half and threw them
                in a big iron kettle of boiling water on the wood fire. I
                watched, wondering if breakfast included boiled coconut.
                Then she skimmed the floating oil off the top of the water,
                put it in a hot skillet, then cleaned and fried the fish!
                She did have some home made sea salt. There were no stores.
                The only business was a hut where guaro (raw rum) was sold
                out of a drum for a fixed weight of gold. Food came from
                the sea, the forest or your own plantings.


                __________________________
                Think like a man of action, act like a man of thought.
                http://www.theabsolute.net/minefield/

                Roy Lent
              • olamoree
                As long as we are remenising, Roy, well, I was up the left fork of the Tigre during 81 and 82 for 20 months --still have my Carnet de Orero!, right at the
                Message 7 of 7 , May 31, 2002
                  As long as we are remenising, Roy, well, I was up the left fork of
                  the Tigre during '81 and '82 for 20 months --still have my Carnet de
                  Orero!, right at the edge of the "park" with two 5hp pumps and about
                  6 of us working that black mud about 4 meters down. Lots of snakes,
                  bats, biting flies, torrencial rains --ah, the life of the "cuzuco"!
                  Every few days, down to Dos Brazos for pichingas of gasoline and some
                  food --an 8 hour trip each way with 4 horses (and me walking!) Chacu
                  would give us a half of a javalina that he "speared" with his double
                  edged 28" machete as it charged him and his dog..... and I would
                  loan him a little pump when his "dig" filled up and he couldn't get
                  those "pepitas" for his Cofal jar! Very interesting "local economy"
                  among the natives: one week long, Saturday down hill to sell
                  whatever the take was for the week, then to the guaro and women, and
                  Sunday night back to the camp with 2Kilos of rice and a kilo of beans
                  for the week, if they remembered to save back a little, otherwise,
                  Hey gringo, can you "loan" me a kilo of rice and beans for my wife
                  and four kids? I'll pay you Saturday or work a day for you. Well,
                  when your rep is "El gringo! Con mulas! y comida!" it's hard to say
                  no. Hey, when do you want to go down and see if there is
                  some "pinta"? Is that what you call "gold fever"? I still have some
                  little bottles of "flakes" and some nice pepitas that I can't bear to
                  part with --each has it's story! Ah, those were the back-breaking
                  days.........

                  Ali

                  > You have a point, Ali. But I'm talking about the wild,
                  > outside coast of the Osa in the 70's. This bare foot gold
                  > miner probably had a problem finding a tin can! When I
                  > wandered into that area, I stayed at a hut and slept on a
                  > board. > Roy Lent
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