Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Looking for information on adopting

Expand Messages
  • ftlaudfl2001
    The Situation: I am a U.S.senior citizen living six months in Costa Rica and six months in Florida. I am a residente pensionado in Costa Rica. Around five
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 4, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      The Situation: I am a U.S.senior citizen living six months in Costa Rica and six months in Florida. I am a residente pensionado in Costa Rica. Around five years ago I became acquainted with a family of five from Nicaragua that was living in Costa Rica. The father can speak and understand English a little but a long ways from being proficient. As I got to know the family I began sponsoring the father in a English school on Saturdays. A couple years ago I began sponsoring the youngest son as well. Over the past five years this Nicaraguan family has become like my family. Besides the language school I help them financially. They are poor family needless to say.




      My Hope: Is that the young boy (12 years old) will become proficient in English so he can get a decent paying job when he get out of school. I have told him I will pay for his college education or trade school if he will attend. I would like him to attend a university here in the U.S. and that may be a problem. If not the U.S. then in Costa Rica. At his age I believe he understands what I am telling him. He said he would like that. He finished fifth grade last year. His two older brothers didn't finish high school and I don't want to see that happen to him. I am putting a lot of faith and hope in this young boy. If he succeeds he will be able to help his family financially.




      The Problem: How am I going to get the boy in to the U.S. His mother and dad willing to do whatever they can to help him get to a school in the U.S. Even though I tell them it is not easy. They think I can adopt him but I believe Nicaragua requires the adopter to be between the age of 20 and 40. I am not sure if you can even adopt a child if both parents are living.




      If anyone has experience or knows of an attorney that has experience in getting a child to the U.S. Please let me know online or off.





      Thank you,




      Fred
      fred.hampton.tu.you@...






      Sent from Windows Mail


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Stephen Riley
      Fred,There is no need in taking the boy to the USA to attend college. We are aiding a young Tico to attend college here and the cost is much less than the USA.
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 4, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        Fred,There is no need in taking the boy to the USA to attend college. We are aiding a young Tico to attend college here and the cost is much less than the USA. It cost around $3K per year.
      • jckincy
        There is no need to adopt someone to get them to the US to go to college. Millions go there every year from all over the world. Many schools actively recruit
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 5, 2014
        • 0 Attachment
          There is no need to adopt someone to get them to the US to go to college. Millions go there every year from all over the world. Many schools actively recruit foriegn stutdents because without them they would go broke. All the student needs is to be admitted by a US college or university and they are eligible for a student visa good for a limited time only while enrolled in that institution. If they want to stay after graduation is another matter and usually involves getting a work visa or getting married to an american (and applying for a green card) before their student visa expires.





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dr. Diane Kholos Wysocki
          Students always come to the us from other countries. They have to pass the tofel test which shows they can read, write and speak English. However in my
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 5, 2014
          • 0 Attachment
            Students always come to the us from other countries. They have to pass the tofel test which shows they can read, write and speak English. However in my experience, schools will make sure there is enough money in the parents accounts to assure that money can be paid.




            So at ucdenver. Instate for 12 credits is $4600, while out of state is $12,000 plus fees. I think the reason us citizens are having their babies in Costa Rica is for the education. It's free there.


            Diane Kholos Wysocki, Professor Emerita
          • nosliwmas
            ... Hmmm... I ve got 4 out of 5 Tico kids either currently in the Costa Rica education system or recent graduates of the Costa Rica education system, and
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 6, 2014
            • 0 Attachment
              Professor Emerita Diane wrote:
              > I think the reason us citizens are having their babies in Costa Rica
              > is for the education. It's free there.


              Hmmm... I've got 4 out of 5 Tico kids either currently in the Costa
              Rica education system or recent graduates of the Costa Rica
              education system, and except for when having the best of becas,
              or when they were taking INA courses or in grade school, I have
              paid for their education. I'll start paying for the 5th one, who is only
              2 years old, next year. Perhaps by, "It's free there" you mean
              "relatively free" or "lower cost?"



              I'm paying ¢50 mil/mes for the youngest student in kindergarten
              right now, and for the older ones at la U it has varied by university
              and course load. Here is an example of costs for attending the
              public Universidad de Costa Rica:


              http://www.oaf.ucr.ac.cr/ http://www.oaf.ucr.ac.cr/

              Servicios
              Aranceles


              So from that you can find that 12 Graduate credits for Costarricenses
              has a basic cost of ¢156780. For foreign (international) students it
              would be ¢571080. Don't forget the "Otros Pagos" for extra costs
              to take exams, insurance, etc. Later there could very well be costs
              for joining the (pretty much mandatory) professional organization
              associated with a career (like the Bar Association for Lawyers, or
              an Engineering Society, etc.)


              I'm not complaining about the costs at all. My youngest in school
              has benefited immensely by the socialization and structure provided
              by his preschool/kindergarten and my oldest has graduated from law
              school with honors and she is working in the Assemblea hob-knobbing
              with the new president and other Costa Rica politicos. A great return
              on my money in both cases.


              Heck, I always figured US citizens were having their babies in Costa
              Rica because the sex was free ("relatively free" or "lower cost!") ;-)


              Just for reference, of course... and because someone will ask...
              Country whores in licensed whorehouses might only be ¢7 mil/hour,
              outside of licensed whorehouses they could be much cheaper
              depending upon negotiating skills of the buyer, however true Tica
              love could very well be free (or not, depending upon the buyer!)


              While country whores can obviously be quite the bargain, I can attest
              that true Tica love is priceless (regardless of cost.)


              --
              Sam, in Guanacaste, rubbing his grubby hands in anticipation of all
              the future political favors he will receive for his investment in tuition!





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.