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CARFAX Report!!!

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  • jmontt1
    Hello everyone! Guys, I am in the process of buying a used car that was imported from USA. Is a 96 Toyota Corolla, is not even registered yet at the Costa Rica
    Message 1 of 4 , May 24, 2014
      Hello everyone!

      Guys, I am in the process of buying a used car that was imported from USA. Is a 96 Toyota Corolla, is not even registered yet at the Costa Rica National Registry. I was wondering if anyone here has access to the unlimited version of CARFAX and would like to help me run a report. I would really greatly appreciate it!!!
      If anyone can help, please contact me off list.


      Joe




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    • bibbity1
      Dear Joe, You are right to be looking for a report. Less expensive reports can be had by going to http://www.vehiclehistory.gov http://www.vehiclehistory.gov/
      Message 2 of 4 , May 25, 2014
        Dear Joe,


        You are right to be looking for a report. Less expensive reports can be had by going to http://www.vehiclehistory.gov http://www.vehiclehistory.gov/ which is the National US reporting system. They have links to several report vendors that sell their reports for from $1 to $10.


        One thing I saw/ learned last year when we were looking for our car is about title washing that can be missed even with a title search. Due to the large number of floods in the US in the past few years there are a ton of flood vehicles and a lot of them have made their way to Central America because they are the cheapest cars on the lot. When we were shopping for our car we saw over 100 vehicle (meaning looked at them and inside their engines), because we knew what to look for we spotted about 80% of them as flood vehicles. It is worth googleing how to recognize a flood vehicle before shopping for a vehicle (rusted oil dipsticks is just one of many, many signs we saw).


        Flood cars are sold at auction, and often after having their title "washed." What that means is a car that was in a flood is moved to a state that does not have floods or flood titles. The flooded car's title will then stay clean, or if already branded with a flood title that "branding" no longer appears on title. The registry above will show "brand history" and help uncover that fact (as will carfax). However, this only works if the car was moved to the no-flood state after having been reported. One thing that I found twice on carfax reports that were CLEAN was a vehicle that had been in one part of the country for most it's life, then was transferred to a new owner in a different state (without flood reporting) who owned it for only a few months before it went to an auction. Both times I looked up the previous state and area, and did a google search for flooding during that year. There were huge floods immediately prior to the transfer of both vehicles out of state followed by movement to auction. Both had clean car faxes. However, the vehicle history report is what enabled my detective work. And it is worth doing. Major motor damage by flood I learned, is often not apparent until months or even a year down the road. Flood damage is often well hidden. However the internet tips on what to look for are really good.


        To that effect I'll add one side note that was new to us about living in CR. We also discovered many cars in CR have water that comes out of the tail pipe, this is common among cars on used car lots because they start up for short periods of time and are not allowed to get to temperature which will cause water in the tail pipe in a perfectly good car-- [also Costa RIcans will often take out, but not replace a malfunctioning thermostat, which is an alternate cause of this problem because the car never gets to sufficient temperature to burn out water condensation] in what may be a perfectly good vehicle). As we learned this also affects ReTeVe performance, so if anyone has a mechanic tell them the thermostat is not needed (as happened when our van was over heating), my advice is putting a functioning thermostat back and save yourself headaches passing.


        Good luck on the new vehicle!


        Larissa


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      • Kurt Sonen
        *All* vehicles will have water exiting the tailpipe. It s a product of the combustion process. A big problem with flood vehicles is corrosion of the wiring,
        Message 3 of 4 , May 26, 2014
          *All* vehicles will have water exiting the tailpipe. It's a product of the
          combustion process.


          A big problem with flood vehicles is corrosion of the wiring, eventually.


          Kurt




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        • bibbity1
          Dear Kurt, I m not sure whether you mis-read my post, or if you are just re-emphasizing my point. I had said water in the tail pipe is not a symptom of a
          Message 4 of 4 , May 27, 2014
            Dear Kurt,


            I'm not sure whether you mis-read my post, or if you are just re-emphasizing my point. I had said water in the tail pipe is not a symptom of a flood vehicle. I believe Priestly, Lavoisier, and Carnot can rest easy. Corrosion of wiring, flood silt in the transmission--just the tip of a flood iceberg. It's worth googling-- big problems and damage to several major systems can be dormant/ hidden for a long time before showing up.


            To everyone else:


            I should be more explicit. It's worth mentioning that in a normal vehicle water can build up in the tail pipe and come out in a gush. There may be other people like myself who have never seen water come out in quantity when starting a sitting vehicle. The quantity that comes out is greater in this climate, because the increased moisture in the air here in Costa Rica increases the level of condensation. I always lived in dryer climates and I've never seen it come out in this quantity before.


            I'm talking about a couple of cups of water coming out of the tailpipe. That was pretty big shock to me when I first saw it while shopping for a vehicle last year. It is definitely worth a mention and useful to know if you're not familiar with it. A significant quantity of water can build up, especially on the car lots, because all the short little spurts of driving without getting up to temperature lead to condensation.


            As an aside: Leaving the thermostat in is best because it allows the car to get up to temperature and burn cleaner. Car without a thermostat out will not get up to temperature and will have a great issue with water in the tail pipe, but more importantly with passing the emission part in ReTeVe. The higher operating temperature a thermostat provides makes combustion more complete and therefor emissions lower.


            Hope this is useful,


            Larissa


            ---In CostaRicaLiving@yahoogroups.com, <kurts2@...> wrote :

            *All* vehicles will have water exiting the tailpipe. It's a product of the
            combustion process.


            A big problem with flood vehicles is corrosion of the wiring, eventually.


            Kurt





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