Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Spanish Pronunciation of English...

Expand Messages
  • S. Mtn Gdn
    ​Just heard this in my class this morning - what a hoot! A student said his mother used this on him for a bad cough: BEEK BUPORRU Give up? It s Vick s Vapor
    Message 1 of 20 , Feb 11, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      ​Just heard this in my class this morning - what a hoot!
       
      A student said his mother used this on him for a bad cough:
       
      BEEK BUPORRU
       
      Give up?  It's Vick's Vapor Rub!
       
      Well, you know they use B/V interchangeably.  And drop word endings.
       
      My student is fr. Colombia.  I asked Hubs if he knew what it was.  He knew instantly because that's what they called it in Peru as well, hahaha.
       
      Years ago, I had the darndest time figuring out what Uh-hucks was...
       
      Cheers,
      Shirley
       
      x
       
    • Jim Cottone
      The pronunciation difficulties go in both directions. I was at the Grecia mall some time ago, with a friend who teaches Spanish to Gringos and English to
      Message 2 of 20 , Feb 12, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        The pronunciation difficulties go in both directions. I was at the Grecia mall some time ago, with a friend who teaches Spanish to Gringos and English to Ticos. I saw a poster for a movie that was playing at the cinema and had to ask what it meant. It was "Lluvia de Hamberguesas". I never would have figured out that "Lluvia" is pronounced "Juvia". The movie was "Flying Hamburgers", which is the Spanish equivalent of "Cloudy with a chance of Meatballs".
        -- 
        Jim Cottone
        American Professional Photographer
        https://singbiker.net
      • steveandpaulacr
        What is Uh-hucks? Paula
        Message 3 of 20 , Feb 12, 2014
        • 0 Attachment
          What is Uh-hucks?

          Paula
        • Jorge Castro
          Many Spanish speaking people, specially in the continental USA, in their daily struggle to communicate, they peninsularized many English words. That is 97
          Message 4 of 20 , Feb 12, 2014
          • 0 Attachment
            Many Spanish speaking people, specially in the continental USA, in their daily struggle to communicate, they peninsularized many English words. That is 97 times out of 100 star the original English word and finish it in the correspondent Spanish ending, up to the point to have some linguistic phenomena, not a language,  they call Spanglish.  This is not the case...."Lluvia de Hamburguesas"  literally translated means "Hamburgers' rain" but this is not a bad translation from the original English movie title "Flying Hamburgers" which means literally "Hamburguesas Voladoras". 
            An educated guess tells me that the original name  "Flying Hamburgers" translated to Spanish.."Hamburguesas Voladoras", might not be a catchy name for Latin audiences,  you know...marketing.. so they  "rename it".. not.." translate it".    
            "Meatballs" has nothing to do with "Hamburgers", they are called in Spanish..."Albondigas" or "Bolas de Carne".    
            "Lluvia"..means.."rain".  
            The sound of  "double ele"...two "L" letters together is the same to the sound of English letter "Y" so you say..."Lluvia"...not "Juvia" , it means noting but a pronunciation mistake.  
            "Cloudy" refers to clouds .."nubes", not to "rain"..."Lluvia",   so,  the sentence ..."Cloudy with a chance of meatballs"..... I might be messing something,  perhaps in the original movie title..not sure,  but just do not understand were it came from, Locks to me like another subject.

            For our eboard:
            FAQs, Medical and Legal Info., recommendations, ads and more...
            http://costaricaliving.proboards.com/index.cgi
            Addresses:
            Post message: CostaRicaLiving@yahoogroups.com 
            Subscribe:  CostaRicaLiving-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
            Unsubscribe:  CostaRicaLiving-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com 
            List owner:  CostaRicaLiving-owner@yahoogroups.com
            URL to this page and archives: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CostaRicaLiving


            COSTA RICA LIVING...PURA VIDA!
            .

          • shellpb
            Uh-hucks is Ajax . At least the a is consistently pronounced in Spanish like uh no matter where you see the a . For Ajax , in English, the first a
            Message 5 of 20 , Feb 12, 2014
            • 0 Attachment

              'Uh-hucks' is 'Ajax'.

              At least the 'a' is consistently pronounced in Spanish like 'uh' no matter where you see the 'a'.

              For 'Ajax', in English, the first 'a' is pronounced 'a' as in 'play', then 'a' as in 'patio'. 

              Much easier pronouncing the vowels in  Spanish because it's *consistent*, yayyyy!

              Cheers,

              Shirley

               


               

            • Jim Cottone
              I think you misunderstood. The original movie title, in English, is Cloudy with a chance of meatballs not Flying Hamburgers . I take it the Spanish version
              Message 6 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
              • 0 Attachment


                I think you misunderstood. The original movie title, in English, is "Cloudy with a chance of meatballs" not "Flying Hamburgers". I take it the Spanish version of the movie title is "Hamburger Rain" or "Raining Hamburgers" based upon what you are telling me.

                -- 
                Jim Cottone
                American Professional Photographer
                https://singbiker.net
              • jckincy
                I agree with Shirley on Spanish being consistant in the pronunciation of vowels, however, I would characterize a as being pronounced as ah as in father.
                Message 7 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                • 0 Attachment
                  I agree with Shirley on Spanish being consistant in the pronunciation of vowels, however, I would characterize 'a' as being pronounced as 'ah' as in father.  Spanish is considered the easiest language for English speakers and Italian is easy also with the same vowels but diffent handling of consonants.  English is a Germanic language at its roots but has a ton of words with Latin roots which means you have a pretty impressive vocabulary once you get the pronunciation down.  For me the consonants are the tricky part of Spanish.

                  For Hispanos and in fact all Latin language speakers English must be very difficult as the irregularity and inconsistancies even drives us native speakers crazy and accounts for so many mis-spelled words.  English is very monosyliabic with words like 'sight' and 'site', same pronunciation but different spelling and meaning. Then there are 'though' and 'through' and 'thought'.
                  That is a lot of letters for one syllable.  I can't even imagine how 'though' would come out of a Hispano's mouth. "Toe"?
                • hickman01
                  You can get quite a discussion going concerning the pronunciation of the double l in Spanish! While I think that correct Spanish pronounces ll as y, that
                  Message 8 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                  • 0 Attachment
                    You can get quite a discussion going concerning the pronunciation of the double l in Spanish!  While I think that "correct" Spanish pronounces ll as y, that isn't the case in Argentina where it has a very strong j sound.  Here in Costa Rica I've noticed it all depends on where you live.  In Punta Arenas they say y, but in Atenas they generally say j, although not a strongly as in Argentina.  I've also noticed that university grads here generally will pronounce it as y whereas maids, gardeners, etc will use the j sound, again, depending on where they grew up here.  So I imagine that Jim has learned to pronounce ll as a j sound since people in Grecia tend to speak that way as well.
                  • jenksbob
                    what does mis-pronunciation have to do with movie titles? Films are often marketed with different names in Spanish; not translations of the English title, but
                    Message 9 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                    • 0 Attachment
                      what does mis-pronunciation have to do with movie titles?  Films are often marketed with different names in Spanish; not translations of the English title, but entirely different names, like "Hangover" becomes "Que Paso Ayer?"
                    • denverboden .
                      Ajax?
                      Message 10 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Ajax?
                      • bryede
                        Lluvia is rain, so it should be something like Hamburger Rain. My understanding is that the J sound is part of the Costa Rican accent. In other countries
                        Message 11 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Lluvia is rain, so it should be something like "Hamburger Rain." My understanding is that the "J" sound is part of the Costa Rican accent. In other countries it would be a "Y" sound.
                        • Jorge Castro
                          When I face the challenge to try to speak English I immediately start to notice the coincidences and differences with our language. I will like to share this
                          Message 12 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                          • 0 Attachment
                             
                            When I face the challenge to try to speak English I immediately start to notice the coincidences and differences with our language. I will like to share this observations base on my personal experiences.  
                              
                             The fact that you can have a word that have different meanings like in Spanish...."banco"...it can be a Bank, a stool, a shoal of fishes, a working table,   I am not sure if this make things easier a more complicate for a non Spanish speaker.  same in English.  
                              
                            All the Spanish alphabet, letter by letter, represent a natural body produced sound....aaaaa.....dddd...mmmm...ppp....oooo, etc, etc  Once you learn a letter sound, wherever you found this letter it will always sound the same,,,no exceptions....Exceptions in English just drive me crazy.  
                              
                            English pronunciation looks mostly made up.  Exceptions, Phrasal verbs, idiomatic sentences...you are right when you say it make everything harder to us...to the point that I honestly believe that if you do not receive the benefits of the natives childhood language introduction, you will never sounds like one, even thou, you can get very close or close enough.  Even worse in spanish.
                              
                            I found many, lets us call it,  fancy words, or not commonly use in spanish that its English form is almost the same.  I have a good Spanish vocabulary and when I built my sentences in English and need to use a word and I do not know the English translation...I take and educated guess, with a lot of success.....As rear is the word..as close is to its English form........idiomatico...idiomatic....idiosincrasia...idiosyncrasy....pronunciación..pronunciation..sociopatico...sociopathic...and goes on and on.  

                            The body vocal apparatus is forced to learn how to produce some sounds or mixed group of it. When you already grow up it becomes harder to emulate  (emular). 



                          • pookiep36
                            Who cares about the pronunciation of that movie or what the title was changed to? That has to be one of the worst animated movies I ve seen in years. And
                            Message 13 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Who cares about the pronunciation of that movie or what the title was changed to?  That has to be one of the worst animated movies I've seen in years.  And they made a sequel?  Argh!
                              I have to say, the change in title, in Spanish, drove my kid crazy.  She thought it was ridiculous that it had nothing to do with the real title.  We saw it in Spanish, here, and then, thinking it might hold up better in English, we streamed it.  The first time it was horrendo and the second time it just sucked.  
                            • Jorge Castro
                              Ja, ja, ja....You are right...it is a bad movie....But this is not the issue. This translation or renaming practice, applies to any movie you want....You are
                              Message 14 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Ja, ja, ja....You are right...it is a bad movie....But this is not the issue.  This translation or renaming practice, applies to any movie you want....You are right it is better watch it in English so you do not  lose meaning because crazy translations. 
                                 
                                I am learning English and even when I am an adult it puts me in your child situation and I can understand his frustration.  Good thinking. 


                              • steveandpaulacr
                                I agree - Shirley s explanation for Uh hucks wasn t quite correct. Since Ajax is both a cleaning product I use and my favourite Dutch football team - I hear
                                Message 15 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  I agree - Shirley's explanation for Uh hucks wasn't quite correct. Since Ajax is both a cleaning product I use and my favourite Dutch football team - I hear it pronounced something like Ahacks or Ahaxs - then I would have recognized it - the A sounding more like the a in father.

                                  Paula
                                • PEH Hargraves
                                  English is indeed daunting for Ticos [otros Latinos tambien]. I alwys flummoxed my hispanic students by asking them to spell fish . They invariable told me
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    English is indeed daunting for Ticos [otros Latinos tambien]. I alwys flummoxed my hispanic students by asking them to spell 'fish'. They invariable told me "F-I-S-H".
                                    I would reply, "No, it is spelled GHOTI: 'GH' as in rough; 'O' as in women; and 'TI as in nation."

                                    --
                                    Dr. Paul E. Hargraves
                                    Emeritus Professor of Oceanography, Univ. of RI
                                    'Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself. '[Mark Twain]
                                  • S. Mtn Gdn
                                    ... Your ah as in father isn t quite the same as my uh as America (two a s in there, both pronounced the same). Casa, mama, America, all uh , yes? That
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Feb 13, 2014
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Hi John & All:
                                       
                                      >I would characterize 'a' as being pronounced as 'ah' as in father
                                       
                                      Your 'ah' as in 'father' isn't quite the same as my
                                      'uh' as America (two a's in there, both pronounced the same).
                                       
                                      Casa, mama, America, all 'uh', yes?
                                       
                                      That sound is apparently called a schwa & is very common in English & can be represented by an a, o, u, etc.  Like in 'brother'' and 'butter'.
                                       
                                      Cheers,
                                      Shirley
                                       
                                      x
                                       
                                    • jckincy
                                      Casa, mama, America, all uh , yes? Shirley, you and I must not be on the same page and perhaps you are speaking of how a is pronounced in English or
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Feb 14, 2014
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        "Casa, mama, America, all 'uh', yes?"
                                        Shirley, you and I must not be on the same page and perhaps you are speaking of how 'a' is pronounced in English or Anglo-American or whatever.
                                        In Spanish, in Costa Rica or anywhere else the letter a is pronounced "ah". This I have on the word of a Tica expert and also several books by "experts" as well as my own ears.  It not only is "ah" in Spanish but also Catalan, Italian, Latin, Portugues, Romanian, but most likely also in Galacian and Occitanian as well.
                                        All of the above idioms have the word "casa" and although the word sounds a little or alot different in each of them the 'a' is clearly always "ah".  In fact the first sylable is always "kah" even if there are nasalizations and other weirdness afoot


                                      • Jim Cottone
                                        Casa, Mama, America, all uh , yes? Wow, you folks certainly learned a different version of English than I did. Must be the eight years of Catholic school.
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Feb 14, 2014
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          "Casa, Mama, America, all "uh", yes?"

                                          Wow, you folks certainly learned a different version of English than I did. Must be the eight years of Catholic school.

                                          Casa and Mama both use the "ah" sound, while America uses the "uh" sound. Most North Americans would not know what I meant if I said muhmuh, but even my grand kids understand mama as "mahmah", and that is how they say it.
                                          -- 
                                          Jim Cottone
                                          American Professional Photographer
                                          https://singbiker.net
                                        • attorneykearney
                                          The ones that always cracked me up was : Kohl gatai Pal mo leee bay Colgate and Palmolive
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Feb 19, 2014
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            The ones that always cracked me up was :
                                            Kohl   gatai  
                                            Pal mo leee bay

                                            Colgate and Palmolive

                                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.