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longline fishing and the effect in costa rica

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  • henry
    there is from an article that was in a.m. costa rica about longlines and the effect on sea turtles and sharks. much of the fish consumed in costa rica,
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 7, 2013
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      there is from an article that was in a.m. costa rica about longlines and the effect on sea turtles and sharks.
      much of the fish consumed in costa rica, especially dorado (aka; mahi mahi) is caught on long lines.  as long as we continue to consume so much sea food this destruction of the ocean ecosystem will continue.  you can make a difference. 
      here is a part of the report.
      By the Drexel University news staff
      The second-most-common catch on Costa Rica’s longline fisheries in the last decade was not a commercial fish species. It was olive ridley sea turtles. These lines also caught more green turtles than most species of fish.
       
      They estimate that more than 699,000 olive ridley and 23,000 greenturtles were caught during the study period 1999 to 2010.
      These findings and more, reported in a new study in the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, indicate that the Costa Rican longline fishery represents a major threat to the survival of eastern Pacific populations of sea turtles as well as sharks
    • Carol Meeds
      Concerned citizens of the Caribbean met yesterday afternoon to discuss the unusual appearance of forty dead turtles found on the beaches from Manzanillo to
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 8, 2013
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        Concerned citizens of the Caribbean met yesterday afternoon to discuss the unusual appearance of forty dead turtles found on the beaches from Manzanillo to Cocles this month.

        The current theory is that the natural sudden bloom of the birth of sharpnose puffer fish resulted in a massive die off when the reef and food on thee reef was too small to support the large number of young juveniles. Similar events have happened in Mexico and Columbia. Pufferfish are poisonous. The theory, somewhat supported by the necropsy findings (Lots of dead fish in the stomachs) is that the turtles have consumed these fish and neurological damage resulted in respiratory distress.
        Countering this theory is the recorded large die off of Pufferfish in the Bocas, Panama on September 6th had no turtle deaths in that area. Speculation is that the current may have increased in strength and brought these turtles here from Panama. 

        The group of citizens is worried about other health effects and some parents will not let their children swim quoting ear infections. 
        A web site has been created to track turtle deaths. 
        https://sites.google.com/site/caribesurturtlemortalitylog/home
        Caribe Sur Turtle Mortality Log

        The phone number to call for dead sea life is: JOSE MASIS 8945-3512

        Tree Fieldposted toPuerto Viejo Foro Abierto / Open Forum
        It is still so important that you send photos of the animals that you are finding that have died. Please help to record what is going on in our community. All that you have to do is upload to Facebook and tag me on the post. Or you are welcome to send it to me direct. Thank you.

        Sigue siendo tan importante que usted envía las fotos de los animales que se encuentran con que han muerto. Por favor, ayuda a grabar lo que está pasando en nuestra comunidad. Todo lo que tienes que hacer es subir a Facebook y me etiqueta en el puesto. O bien, pueden enviarlas a mí directamente. Gracias.

        https://sites.google.com/site/caribesurturtlemortalitylog/home
        Caribe Sur Turtle Mortality Log
        sites.google.com
        This site is to log the turtle deaths in the beaches near Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica

        Tree Fieldposted toPuerto Viejo Foro Abierto / Open Forum
        Tips for taking a good photo for the turtle mortality log:

        1. Include the entire body with an object (like your foot) next to the turtle. This will give perspective of the size.
        2. Take another picture of a close up of the head. This will help to identify whether it is a green or hawksbill turtle.
        3. Take another picture of the tail. This will identify what sex the turtle is.

        *****************

        Consejos para tomar una buena foto para el registro de la mortalidad de tortugas:

        1. Incluya todo el cuerpo con un objeto (como el pie) junto a la tortuga. Esto le dará perspectiva del tamaño.
        2. Tome otra fotografía de un primer plano de la cabeza. Esto le ayudará a identificar si se trata de una tortuga verde o carey.
        3. Tome otra fotografía de la cola. Esto le permitirá identificar el sexo de la tortuga.
         
         


      • Mark Klempner
        Have y all seen these articles about ecoproblems in Costa Rica? This  from National Geographic:
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 9, 2013
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          Have y'all seen these articles about ecoproblems in Costa Rica? This  from National Geographic:

          http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/09/130930-banana-demand-caiman-costa-rica-animals-science/

          And this from Phys.org:

          http://phys.org/news/2013-10-longline-fishery-costa-rica-thousands.html

        • Dr. Paul E. Hargraves
          These turtle mortality events are consistent with the neurotoxic effects of some microscopic phytoplankton called dinoflagellates, often [but erroneously]
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 9, 2013
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            These turtle mortality events are consistent with the neurotoxic effects of some microscopic phytoplankton called dinoflagellates, often [but erroneously] called "red tide".  The toxins are produced by these dinoflagellates and translocated through the food web, becoming more concentrated at each level. The Pacific coast of Central Maerica has dozens of POTENTIALLY toxic species [including the Golfo de Nicoya and surrounding coastlines]. Blooms are often initiated by nutrient enrichment, especially nitrogen, and untreated sewage is a good source. Costa Rica has plenty of that.
            That is also consistent with turtle mortality in C.R. but not in Panama [for now].  Local conditions change constantly.

            --
            Dr. Paul E. Hargraves

          • cah_ec
            re: National Geographic s  Demand for Bananas Puts Costa Rica s Caimans at Risk it s worth checking out this article referenced by Anne Vezina the fourth
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 10, 2013
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              re: National Geographic's 

              Demand for Bananas Puts Costa Rica's Caimans at Risk

              it's worth checking out this article referenced by Anne Vezina the fourth Comment below the article:

              http://www.promusa.org/tiki-view_blog_post.php?postId=314

               



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