Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Why Santa Ana is not a rock guitar player

Expand Messages
  • David Fogg
    ... Hi Bob, Not strange at all: in Spanish, if one word ends with the same vowel as the next word begins, you drop one of the vowels and pronounce the two as a
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 21, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      > Date: Fri, 20 Sep 2002 17:35:48 -0700 (PDT)
      > From: Bob Harrington <blue74730@...>
      > Subject: Golf
      >
      > By the way everyone in SJ
      > calls Santa Ana, Santana, which seems strange to me.

      Hi Bob,

      Not strange at all: in Spanish, if one word ends with the same vowel as the
      next word begins, you drop one of the vowels and pronounce the two as a
      unit:

      tiene esa = tienesa / como otros = comotros / masa harina = masarina
      albahaca = albaca

      The last 2 examples show that it applies even past a silent aitch, and even
      _within_ a word.

      BTW, this is not "lazy" Spanish; it's standard pronunciation. Spanish (like
      French) doesn't take the pains to keep word boundaries hearable that English
      and German do, which often introduce a mild glottal stop between words if
      they would otherwise run together.

      This also explains something that puzzles many people learning Spanish:

      Why "el agua" but "las aguas"? Becuz "la agua" -- grammatically correct --
      would be spoken as "lagua", which would be heard as "el agua" anyway. The
      plural form reverts to the actual gender, since the pronunciation there is
      not affected. The proof that the singular really still is feminine can be
      seen in a phrase like "agua fría".

      David
    • Martin Rice
      David wrote: Why el agua but las aguas ? Becuz la agua -- grammatically correct -- would be spoken as lagua , which would be heard as el agua anyway.
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 21, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        David wrote:
        Why "el agua" but "las aguas"? Becuz "la agua" -- grammatically correct --
        would be spoken as "lagua", which would be heard as "el agua" anyway. The
        plural form reverts to the actual gender, since the pronunciation there is
        not affected. The proof that the singular really still is feminine can be
        seen in a phrase like "agua fría".

        David,
        thanks so much for this. This particular one has been driving me nuts for two years now :-)

        Regards,
        Martin



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Steven Johnson
        Hope this further clears up the mystery..... How do you know whether a feminine noun with a as the first syllable takes el or la ? For example, agua,
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 23, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Hope this further clears up the mystery.....

          How do you know whether a feminine noun with "a" as the first syllable
          takes "el" or "la"?

          For example, agua, águila, aduana and azúcar are all feminine and all
          begin with "a" as the first syllable.

          But some take "el":

          el agua
          el águila

          while others take "la":

          la aduana
          la azúcar

          Answer: It takes "el" if the first syllable is stressed; it takes "la"
          if the first syllable is not stressed.
        • John
          Another example: A friend of mine asked me why so many little hispanic girls are named Mija. That made me laugh. It s the contracted form of mi hija , or my
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 1, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Another example:

            A friend of mine asked me why so many little hispanic girls are
            named "Mija." That made me laugh. It's the contracted form of "mi
            hija", or my daughter.
          • Paul Mitchell
            ... ~^~^~^~ David (and Martin & Bob), Everything that has been reported in this thread is accurate. The melding of two words together like Santa Ana / Santana
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 2, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In CostaRicaLiving@yahoogroups.com, David Fogg
              <dmfogg@...> wrote:
              >
              > > Date: Fri, 20 Sep 2002 17:35:48 -0700 (PDT)
              > > From: Bob Harrington <blue74730@...>
              > > Subject: Golf
              > >
              > > By the way everyone in SJ
              > > calls Santa Ana, Santana, which seems strange to me.
              >
              > Hi Bob,
              >
              > [snip], if one word ends with the same vowel as the
              > next word begins, you drop one of the vowels and
              > pronounce the two as a unit...
              >
              > [snip] it's standard pronunciation. Spanish (like
              > French) doesn't take the pains to keep word
              > boundaries hearable that English and German
              > do, which often introduce a mild glottal stop between
              > words if they would otherwise run together.
              >
              ~^~^~^~
              David (and Martin & Bob),

              Everything that has been reported in this thread is
              accurate. The melding of two words together like

              Santa Ana / Santana

              is properly known as elision.

              One other point made above is not true in every case...
              As far as maintaining two words separately, yes, for
              making a phrase understandable, this is often done.

              But don't forget, when we speak our own native language
              we do the same thing, eliding vowels. We just don't
              hear it amongst ourselves. For example,

              Jeet yet? (Did you eat yet?) and so on...

              Now, made aware of this you can probably think
              of a number of other examples of elision in english.

              Cheers!

              Paul M.
              [still stuck in Tampa]
              ==
            • Paul Mitchell
              Sorry for the partial piggyback in my previous post. I removed most of the earlier post but forgot a bit of extraneous stuff at the top. I m going to stand in
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 2, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Sorry for the partial piggyback in my previous post.

                I removed most of the earlier post but forgot a bit
                of extraneous stuff at the top.

                I'm going to stand in the corner now, for an hour or so.

                With head hung down in abject embarassment,

                Paul M.
                ==
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.