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RE: [Coronado25] Re: Good news

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  • Alan Johnson
    The keel bolts might be good but the wood backing blocks may be loose or rotten. My keel bolts were so corroded they were virtually welded with no way to
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 28, 2013
      The keel bolts might be good but the wood backing blocks may be loose or rotten. My keel bolts were so corroded they were virtually welded with no way to tighten them. I had 4x4x2 inch thick wood backing blocks that were rotten and allowed the keel to wobble an fraction of what you are seeing.  I removed the wood blocking and I got two more inches of solid clean threads to put new 1/4 stainless backing plates and nuts. Now they ring like a bell when tapped. Hope this helps. Alan 


      From: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Coronado25@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brian
      Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2013 7:56 PM
      To: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Coronado25] Re: Good news

       

      Ditto what Andrew said. An inch or two is a LOT of play. Just remember, you've got a little over a ton of lead hanging from those bolts and every time they move at all your creating a bigger and bigger problem. The keel and hull should essentially be one piece. Nothing should be moving around, not even an inch or two. Before you do any painting you should find out what's caused things to get loose and fix it.

    • jduncan40
      While my boat is out of the water in the cradle I have added three 1/2 x 8 lag bolts with 3 ss washers next to the keel bolts. I drilled 3/8 holes down
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 4, 2013
        While my boat is out of the water in the cradle I have added three 1/2" x 8" lag bolts with 3" ss washers next to the keel bolts. I drilled 3/8" holes down into the keel then took my time and screwed the lag bolts in and sealed then with marine sealant. I hope this will help take some of the load off of the keel bolts. I read about this fix in a couple of the Catalina sailboat groups.

        I after the boat is back in the water I plan to hopefully do what you did and remove one of the wood blocks to see if the threads are clean. If so I will also do the 1/4" stainless steel backing plates and nuts.

        JD

        --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "Alan Johnson" <ajohnson@...> wrote:
        >
        > The keel bolts might be good but the wood backing blocks may be loose or
        > rotten. My keel bolts were so corroded they were virtually welded with
        > no way to tighten them. I had 4x4x2 inch thick wood backing blocks that
        > were rotten and allowed the keel to wobble an fraction of what you are
        > seeing. I removed the wood blocking and I got two more inches of solid
        > clean threads to put new 1/4 stainless backing plates and nuts. Now they
        > ring like a bell when tapped. Hope this helps. Alan
        >
        > ________________________________
        >
        > From: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Coronado25@yahoogroups.com] On
        > Behalf Of Brian
        > Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2013 7:56 PM
        > To: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Coronado25] Re: Good news
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Ditto what Andrew said. An inch or two is a LOT of play. Just remember,
        > you've got a little over a ton of lead hanging from those bolts and
        > every time they move at all your creating a bigger and bigger problem.
        > The keel and hull should essentially be one piece. Nothing should be
        > moving around, not even an inch or two. Before you do any painting you
        > should find out what's caused things to get loose and fix it.
        >
      • Alan Johnson
        JD: I am sure you are anxious to get this boat in the water and try it out but I would do this keel bolt job while all the load is on the keel. There is 3000
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 5, 2013
          JD: I am sure you are anxious to get this boat in the water and try it out but I would do this keel bolt job while all the load is on the keel. There is 3000 lbs down there trying to pull away from the hull if it goes back in the water. You efforts of adding three more lag bolts are commendable and will add a great deal to the structural integrity of the keel hull connection but the true keel bolts go nearly two feet into the keel. Just some thoughts. Alan
          From: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Coronado25@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jduncan40
          Sent: Thursday, July 04, 2013 3:15 PM
          To: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Coronado25] Re: Good news

           

          While my boat is out of the water in the cradle I have added three 1/2" x 8" lag bolts with 3" ss washers next to the keel bolts. I drilled 3/8" holes down into the keel then took my time and screwed the lag bolts in and sealed then with marine sealant. I hope this will help take some of the load off of the keel bolts. I read about this fix in a couple of the Catalina sailboat groups.

          I after the boat is back in the water I plan to hopefully do what you did and remove one of the wood blocks to see if the threads are clean. If so I will also do the 1/4" stainless steel backing plates and nuts.

          JD

          --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "Alan Johnson" <ajohnson@...> wrote:

          >
          > The keel bolts might be
          good but the wood backing blocks may be loose or
          > rotten. My keel bolts
          were so corroded they were virtually welded with
          > no way to tighten them.
          I had 4x4x2 inch thick wood backing blocks that
          > were rotten and allowed
          the keel to wobble an fraction of what you are
          > seeing. I removed the
          wood blocking and I got two more inches of solid
          > clean threads to put
          new 1/4 stainless backing plates and nuts. Now they
          > ring like a bell
          when tapped. Hope this helps. Alan
          >
          >
          ________________________________
          >
          > From:
          href="mailto:Coronado25%40yahoogroups.com">Coronado25@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Coronado25@yahoogroups.com] On
          > Behalf Of Brian
          > Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2013 7:56 PM
          >
          To: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com
          >
          Subject: [Coronado25] Re: Good news
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          Ditto what Andrew said. An inch or two is a LOT of play. Just remember,
          >
          you've got a little over a ton of lead hanging from those bolts and
          >
          every time they move at all your creating a bigger and bigger problem.
          >
          The keel and hull should essentially be one piece. Nothing should be
          >
          moving around, not even an inch or two. Before you do any painting you
          >
          should find out what's caused things to get loose and fix it.
          >

        • Michael Formica
          My keel bolts sound pretty secure when I hit them with a hammer, an the wood backing them is solid. But the bilge they sit in does have water in it. I
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 5, 2013
            My keel bolts sound pretty secure when I hit them with a hammer, an the wood backing them is solid.  But the bilge they sit in does have water in it.  I haven't pulled my boat from the water yet but intend to do so later this week and replace the brass seacocks with bronze seacocks, and ascertain the condition of the paint.   

            It will be interesting to see what condition the keel is.  Is there a good resource on line for how to replace the keel bolts themselves?  Where would I even find them, and once found, how do I separate the keel from the boat (an then reattach it).  

            Is this something a marina could do if it needed to be done?


            On Jul 5, 2013, at 11:26 AM, "Alan Johnson" <ajohnson@...> wrote:

             

            JD: I am sure you are anxious to get this boat in the water and try it out but I would do this keel bolt job while all the load is on the keel. There is 3000 lbs down there trying to pull away from the hull if it goes back in the water. You efforts of adding three more lag bolts are commendable and will add a great deal to the structural integrity of the keel hull connection but the true keel bolts go nearly two feet into the keel. Just some thoughts. Alan
            From: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Coronado25@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jduncan40
            Sent: Thursday, July 04, 2013 3:15 PM
            To: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Coronado25] Re: Good news

             

            While my boat is out of the water in the cradle I have added three 1/2" x 8" lag bolts with 3" ss washers next to the keel bolts. I drilled 3/8" holes down into the keel then took my time and screwed the lag bolts in and sealed then with marine sealant. I hope this will help take some of the load off of the keel bolts. I read about this fix in a couple of the Catalina sailboat groups.

            I after the boat is back in the water I plan to hopefully do what you did and remove one of the wood blocks to see if the threads are clean. If so I will also do the 1/4" stainless steel backing plates and nuts.

            JD

            --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "Alan Johnson" <ajohnson@...> wrote:
            >
            > The keel bolts might be good but the wood backing blocks may be loose or
            > rotten. My keel bolts were so corroded they were virtually welded with
            > no way to tighten them. I had 4x4x2 inch thick wood backing blocks that
            > were rotten and allowed the keel to wobble an fraction of what you are
            > seeing. I removed the wood blocking and I got two more inches of solid
            > clean threads to put new 1/4 stainless backing plates and nuts. Now they
            > ring like a bell when tapped. Hope this helps. Alan
            >
            > ________________________________
            >
            > From: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Coronado25@yahoogroups.com] On
            > Behalf Of Brian
            > Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2013 7:56 PM
            > To: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [Coronado25] Re: Good news
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Ditto what Andrew said. An inch or two is a LOT of play. Just remember,
            > you've got a little over a ton of lead hanging from those bolts and
            > every time they move at all your creating a bigger and bigger problem.
            > The keel and hull should essentially be one piece. Nothing should be
            > moving around, not even an inch or two. Before you do any painting you
            > should find out what's caused things to get loose and fix it.
            >

          • Alan Johnson
            JD: There is an old Coronado web site called : concentric that has a thread on replacing the keel bolts and some specs. It is not an easy thing to do. They are
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 5, 2013
              JD: There is an old Coronado web site called : concentric that has a thread on replacing the keel bolts and some specs. It is not an easy thing to do. They are basically long all thread and they can be unscrewed out of the keel but I have never heard of anyone being successful at this. I would only try to replace them if they are broken beyond replacing the keel bolt nuts. Once the keel is loaded you may want to see if you can tighten ( or loosen being careful not to break the bolt) the keel nuts and see how much you can draw up the keel.  Alan


              From: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Coronado25@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Michael Formica
              Sent: Friday, July 05, 2013 8:41 AM
              To: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: <Coronado25@yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: Re: [Coronado25] Re: Good news

               

              My keel bolts sound pretty secure when I hit them with a hammer, an the wood backing them is solid.  But the bilge they sit in does have water in it.  I haven't pulled my boat from the water yet but intend to do so later this week and replace the brass seacocks with bronze seacocks, and ascertain the condition of the paint.   

              It will be interesting to see what condition the keel is.  Is there a good resource on line for how to replace the keel bolts themselves?  Where would I even find them, and once found, how do I separate the keel from the boat (an then reattach it).  

              Is this something a marina could do if it needed to be done?


              On Jul 5, 2013, at 11:26 AM, "Alan Johnson" <ajohnson@...> wrote:

               

              JD: I am sure you are anxious to get this boat in the water and try it out but I would do this keel bolt job while all the load is on the keel. There is 3000 lbs down there trying to pull away from the hull if it goes back in the water. You efforts of adding three more lag bolts are commendable and will add a great deal to the structural integrity of the keel hull connection but the true keel bolts go nearly two feet into the keel. Just some thoughts. Alan
              From: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Coronado25@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jduncan40
              Sent: Thursday, July 04, 2013 3:15 PM
              To: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Coronado25] Re: Good news

               

              While my boat is out of the water in the cradle I have added three 1/2" x 8" lag bolts with 3" ss washers next to the keel bolts. I drilled 3/8" holes down into the keel then took my time and screwed the lag bolts in and sealed then with marine sealant. I hope this will help take some of the load off of the keel bolts. I read about this fix in a couple of the Catalina sailboat groups.

              I after the boat is back in the water I plan to hopefully do what you did and remove one of the wood blocks to see if the threads are clean. If so I will also do the 1/4" stainless steel backing plates and nuts.

              JD

              --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "Alan Johnson" <ajohnson@...> wrote:
              >
              > The keel bolts might be good but the wood backing blocks may be loose or
              > rotten. My keel bolts were so corroded they were virtually welded with
              > no way to tighten them. I had 4x4x2 inch thick wood backing blocks that
              > were rotten and allowed the keel to wobble an fraction of what you are
              > seeing. I removed the wood blocking and I got two more inches of solid
              > clean threads to put new 1/4 stainless backing plates and nuts. Now they
              > ring like a bell when tapped. Hope this helps. Alan
              >
              > ________________________________
              >
              > From: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Coronado25@yahoogroups.com] On
              > Behalf Of Brian
              > Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2013 7:56 PM
              > To: Coronado25@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [Coronado25] Re: Good news
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Ditto what Andrew said. An inch or two is a LOT of play. Just remember,
              > you've got a little over a ton of lead hanging from those bolts and
              > every time they move at all your creating a bigger and bigger problem.
              > The keel and hull should essentially be one piece. Nothing should be
              > moving around, not even an inch or two. Before you do any painting you
              > should find out what's caused things to get loose and fix it.
              >

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