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Re: Tidal Range

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  • xherrmann
    I have a confession to make. I ve come to think that the way I tell this story about stuff jumping across the cabin is not strictly true. I m on my boat right
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 5, 2011
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      I have a confession to make. I've come to think that the way I tell this story about stuff jumping across the cabin is not strictly true.

      I'm on my boat right now and noticing how the dinette table is about an inch higher than the galley counter, I started wondering: how could something go across not "straight" but actually upwards?

      In truth, the objects to which I was referring were my 1 1/2 qt. stainless steel pot and lid, and they started out atop the gimbaled alcohol stove on the galley counter, and not the counter itself.

      Launched across the boat to the dinette table, the pair hit on the far side then came sliding back on the boat's reverse swing. After skipping on the lip at the edge of the table they jumped the gap and hit almost squarely on the edge of the galley counter, but just high enough to vault into the face of the stove. The stove came completely off its gimbals during this event. (And of course everything not tied down ultimately ended up on the cabin sole just as happened in Phil's story... drawers and their contents too.)

      While possibly being guilty of some exaggeration sometimes, I may have actually underreported the up-and-down swing the bow of my boat was going through when I hit those tidal surge waves I'd previously described. Upon further consideration, I recall hanging on the forestay at the top of each swing and looking back at the cockpit wistfully... except that I didn't perceive myself so much to be looking aft at the cockpit, but rather down at it.



      X Herrmann
    • philmbray2001
      Xherrmann, Stuff finding it s way to the floor is not unusual for me as I m such a forgetful and untidy so and so, and I would probably have an extra few
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 6, 2011
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        Xherrmann,

        Stuff finding it's way to the floor is not unusual for me as I'm such a forgetful and untidy so and so, and I would probably have an extra few inches of freeboard if I removed some of the crap I keep aboard.

        Anyway, I remember going for a spin in mine one Sunday morning a few years ago. A sunny day with a lovely southeasterly breeze. My pal, a sailor of many years experience, was the crew. Up went the mains'l as we left the West Pier behind, the headsail already hanked on. We'd left an hour later than most of the other boats out there through pure laziness but we weren't going anywhere in particular, just a pleasant morning sail followed by a few drinks in the clubhouse was the plan.

        We were surprised, on such a lovely day, to see a convoy of around a dozen boats returning to harbour - it wasn't long before we discovered why! The famous (infamous) Channel Slop. This is a wind-against tide situation in the Bristol Channel when the westerly swell, assisted by the incoming tide hits the barrier of any wind with East in it and creates a nasty steep sea. Once you're outside the shelter of the headland there's nowhere to hide. If you're going to be seasick now is the time - even the fish don't bite in those conditions! Bad enough in a yacht, what it's like in a small fishing boat I wouldn't to discover for myself.

        Soon it was time to put a reef in the main and change the genoa for the No.1, my boat, my job. Forehatch open with the new sail ready, it was up to the mast to drop the halliard then off to the foredeck with lifejacket and harness both securely attached. By the time I got there the swell had steepened to about 6-8 feet which means that at the top you're about 12-18 feet and more above the water and having the occasional shower. Talk about a bare knuckle ride! I managed to unhank the old sail and fit the new - just! I was soaked and shattered by the time I edged my way back to the cockpit and we decided, within 30 minutes, to call it a day.

        We sat back at the berth whilst waiting for the sails to dry a bit, and after mopping up and clearing the cabin floor. I believe it was then that I decided to bite the bullet and fit a furling headsail. Now that was a great decision!
      • xherrmann
        I can be a bit untidy myself... Sometimes when I m in a particular hurry to get sailing - perhaps due to failing light or a burgeoning foul current - I ll
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 6, 2011
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          I can be a bit untidy myself...

          Sometimes when I'm in a particular hurry to get sailing - perhaps due to failing light or a burgeoning foul current - I'll simply clear whatever is on the table and counter while reciting a phrase which rhymes somewhat with a railroad conductor's historic cry: "All afloor that's going afloor." When the wind is gusting over 20kts I know it's all going to end up down there anyhow: might as well get it over with a minimum of breakage and in-transit noise surprises.

          I remember K. Adlard Coles whose Heavy Weather Sailing book early editions included many stories about racing in such conditions as you describe - back in the day before boats went to weather quite as well as they do now - and he advocated lying at anchor even during a race rather than face the steep waves created when a favorable current is opposing the wind. Then it was accepted wisdom that more progress could be made to windward against a foul current then with the current at one's stern. I really think these older editions have a quality that can be underappreciated, because despite the inapplicability - or just plain inaccuracy - of much of the advice therein, he teaches many fantastic lessons concerning the psychology of heavy weather sailing with those stories. Those have been a great help to me.

          I have never rigged a proper jackline so I could use a harness which will keep me from falling overboard, so I try to never let go of the boat and view the edge of the deck like a 1000 foot precipice. I do keep my deck lifelines in good order and replace them when the juncture between the wire and the swage fitting at the pulpit shows the least sign of rust. And I seldom fail to wear my life vest as my worst fear is to spend my last minutes on earth cursing myself for not wearing it. Far better to be floating high and in relatively good spirits to facilitate my planning for survival if such an situation might come to pass.

          As for roller furling, I used to sail on another fellow's Coronado 25 that had a small jib which rolled up just behind the forestay, and that worked quite well and the whole works could be lowered to the deck after rolling and stuffed down the foredeck hatch. In general, though, I consider the trade-offs of a roller furler to be unappealing - though to be sure if someone were to give me one for free I might decide to install it.

          I don't care for the extra windage created by a roller furler which I think might tend to increase kiting around at anchor and unmanageability while navigating under power in confined areas. Most of all I don't care for the diminished performance which derives from the turbulence at the luff created whenever such a sail is rolled up in the least part, but especially so if it is rolled up more than 25 percent. My preference is to run a small jib when a fresh breeze can be expected and depower my sailplan be reefing - or completely lowering - my mainsail. I've come to realize that my boat goes quite well with a small staysail and often those times are the only times I can fully power up the main.

          In over 20 knots my boat balances perfectly with just the small jib and no main and I've passed many a larger vessel going to windward with that sailplan.

          One other advantage of hank-on headsails is that these are more readily available at a bargain due to the prevalence of roller furling systems being installed on older boats.

          X Herrmann

          --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "philmbray2001" <philmbray2001@...> wrote:
          >
          > Xherrmann,
          >
          > Stuff finding it's way to the floor is not unusual for me as I'm such a forgetful and untidy so and so, and I would probably have an extra few inches of freeboard if I removed some of the crap I keep aboard.
          >
          > Anyway, I remember going for a spin in mine one Sunday morning a few years ago. A sunny day with a lovely southeasterly breeze. My pal, a sailor of many years experience, was the crew. Up went the mains'l as we left the West Pier behind, the headsail already hanked on. We'd left an hour later than most of the other boats out there through pure laziness but we weren't going anywhere in particular, just a pleasant morning sail followed by a few drinks in the clubhouse was the plan.
          >
          > We were surprised, on such a lovely day, to see a convoy of around a dozen boats returning to harbour - it wasn't long before we discovered why! The famous (infamous) Channel Slop. This is a wind-against tide situation in the Bristol Channel when the westerly swell, assisted by the incoming tide hits the barrier of any wind with East in it and creates a nasty steep sea. Once you're outside the shelter of the headland there's nowhere to hide. If you're going to be seasick now is the time - even the fish don't bite in those conditions! Bad enough in a yacht, what it's like in a small fishing boat I wouldn't to discover for myself.
          >
          > Soon it was time to put a reef in the main and change the genoa for the No.1, my boat, my job. Forehatch open with the new sail ready, it was up to the mast to drop the halliard then off to the foredeck with lifejacket and harness both securely attached. By the time I got there the swell had steepened to about 6-8 feet which means that at the top you're about 12-18 feet and more above the water and having the occasional shower. Talk about a bare knuckle ride! I managed to unhank the old sail and fit the new - just! I was soaked and shattered by the time I edged my way back to the cockpit and we decided, within 30 minutes, to call it a day.
          >
          > We sat back at the berth whilst waiting for the sails to dry a bit, and after mopping up and clearing the cabin floor. I believe it was then that I decided to bite the bullet and fit a furling headsail. Now that was a great decision!
          >
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