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New owner of Old Coronado 25... Should she have a DNR?

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  • jpncommunications@sbcglobal.net
    I am now an owner of a 1968 fixed keel Coronado 25. I am looking to find out if she is worth trying to save or if I should scrap her out. She sat with about 2
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 4, 2009
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      I am now an owner of a 1968 fixed keel Coronado 25. I am looking to find out if she is worth trying to save or if I should scrap her out. She sat with about 2 feet of water in her this past winter. Combined with incorrect positioning of the hull on the trailer and the weight of the water, she now has indentations or what appears to be soft spots on both sides of the back of the boat where she rested on the rollers. My father in-law is a 30 year body man and expert in fiberglass work. On auto that is. I was given the boat for free so I have no cost yet . There are 2 sets of sails that appear to be in good shape with no rips or tears. All the interior is there and in ok shape I suppose and the engine is fine as well. The mast and boom also seem to be fine. There is no rudder or tiller. I am trying to find out what the cost factor is before going in to this. I have always wanted a sailboat but could never afford a good size one. Any help or input would be gratly appreciated. Thanks everyone. I am in Chicago. Just a side note, 25 ft should be big enough for Lake Michigan, No?
    • world_in_chaos
      Hey, Well let s see if I can give my perspective of the answers to your questions. 1. If you ve got an expert on fiberglass, regardless of the field, it can
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 5, 2009
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        Hey,

        Well let's see if I can give my perspective of the answers to your questions.

        1. If you've got an expert on fiberglass, regardless of the field, it can easily be adapted to boatwork and is a much better start than having zero experience. I would recommend buying a good sailboat DIY bible ~$40, and then laying up the fiberglass soft spots from the inside, with some kind of strong backing while you're at it. If you have to cut away part of the cabin with a jigsaw to reach an arm in there, so be it, just make sure you cut away the right part of the cabin interior, and not the hull or a place where you can't reach it from. This job is 90% labor, 10% cost, so since you got the boat for free, you're fine.

        2. A lot of the stuff that you state "seem" to be fine will make or break whether you can fix her up for cheap. For instance, the engine. If the engine really is fine, you're set. But if it's not, the money will start flowing. However being in a big city like Chi you should be able to find someone to fix an A4 for cheap. (or was it an outboard, because that will be even easier to fix since you can remove it and bring it where your want)... The same goes with the mast, boom, and sails, and more specifically all the standing rigging, as that is where a fault would likely be with an old rig. If all of the wires are mostly free of rust, and there are no broken strands, then you are good to go. If you have a few broken strands here and there then I would heavily suggest replacing all the wires of the standing rigging, and that can be $300 or more, depending upon if you swage it yourself or have it all made for you.

        3. The rudder and tiller are do-able, but probably on the more difficult end. There is a guy on this forum who is making his own rudder and I'm sure he can help you out. From my impression, you have to get the right size pipe for the length of the whole yoke and rudder and then weld on some support beams, layup fiberglass around it, coat it, and then weld/bolt on the yoke/tiller assembly on the top. Around the boat yards in Long beach and Los Angeles, this would be very easy for me because I have specifically seen either very similar rudders or the exact Coronado rudders, as well as 20-30 intact tiller assemblies. It would only cost $150 at most of these places assuming that the wood of the tiller looks greyish and old, which you could cleanup anyway. What I'm getting at is that you may be able to find a boat salvage yard around Chicago/ Lake Michigan area.

        4. As for the side note, I met a couple that sailed to Hawaii in a Coronado 25 about 10 years ago from Baja California area. So, 25 feet will do fine for Lake Michigan as far as I know. You probably have to worry more about giant jet boats and diesel powered #$&*%^s cutting you off and nearly hitting you, in which case the size of your boat is more about intimidation rather than safety.

        We all know my opinion on powerboats now, don't we?

        Hope that helps
        Peter


        --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "jpncommunications@..." <jpncommunications@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am now an owner of a 1968 fixed keel Coronado 25. I am looking to find out if she is worth trying to save or if I should scrap her out. She sat with about 2 feet of water in her this past winter. Combined with incorrect positioning of the hull on the trailer and the weight of the water, she now has indentations or what appears to be soft spots on both sides of the back of the boat where she rested on the rollers. My father in-law is a 30 year body man and expert in fiberglass work. On auto that is. I was given the boat for free so I have no cost yet . There are 2 sets of sails that appear to be in good shape with no rips or tears. All the interior is there and in ok shape I suppose and the engine is fine as well. The mast and boom also seem to be fine. There is no rudder or tiller. I am trying to find out what the cost factor is before going in to this. I have always wanted a sailboat but could never afford a good size one. Any help or input would be gratly appreciated. Thanks everyone. I am in Chicago. Just a side note, 25 ft should be big enough for Lake Michigan, No?
        >
      • jpncommunications@sbcglobal.net
        Hey Peter, Thanks for all the info. I will be heading out to my local Bookstore this weekend to get started on my grail quest for a watered down education.
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 6, 2009
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          Hey Peter,

          Thanks for all the info. I will be heading out to my local Bookstore this weekend to get started on my grail quest for a watered down education. The wire/cable that lines the perimeter of the boat (standing rigging?)isnt rusted or have any broken strands, so thats a good thing. The engine is a 9.9 outboard so that makes repair easier I suppose. I do know that a couple of the stancions have some spider web cracks and there are cushions for the v berth only.

          As for the #$&*@^s power boats, I will be steering clear of any objects either mobile or stationary until I complete some sailing classes. Assuming I can get her sea worthy buy the end of summer. I appreciate all information and will be posting pictures as I get them and progress. Thanks again.



          --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "world_in_chaos" <peter.scranton@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hey,
          >
          > Well let's see if I can give my perspective of the answers to your questions.
          >
          > 1. If you've got an expert on fiberglass, regardless of the field, it can easily be adapted to boatwork and is a much better start than having zero experience. I would recommend buying a good sailboat DIY bible ~$40, and then laying up the fiberglass soft spots from the inside, with some kind of strong backing while you're at it. If you have to cut away part of the cabin with a jigsaw to reach an arm in there, so be it, just make sure you cut away the right part of the cabin interior, and not the hull or a place where you can't reach it from. This job is 90% labor, 10% cost, so since you got the boat for free, you're fine.
          >
          > 2. A lot of the stuff that you state "seem" to be fine will make or break whether you can fix her up for cheap. For instance, the engine. If the engine really is fine, you're set. But if it's not, the money will start flowing. However being in a big city like Chi you should be able to find someone to fix an A4 for cheap. (or was it an outboard, because that will be even easier to fix since you can remove it and bring it where your want)... The same goes with the mast, boom, and sails, and more specifically all the standing rigging, as that is where a fault would likely be with an old rig. If all of the wires are mostly free of rust, and there are no broken strands, then you are good to go. If you have a few broken strands here and there then I would heavily suggest replacing all the wires of the standing rigging, and that can be $300 or more, depending upon if you swage it yourself or have it all made for you.
          >
          > 3. The rudder and tiller are do-able, but probably on the more difficult end. There is a guy on this forum who is making his own rudder and I'm sure he can help you out. From my impression, you have to get the right size pipe for the length of the whole yoke and rudder and then weld on some support beams, layup fiberglass around it, coat it, and then weld/bolt on the yoke/tiller assembly on the top. Around the boat yards in Long beach and Los Angeles, this would be very easy for me because I have specifically seen either very similar rudders or the exact Coronado rudders, as well as 20-30 intact tiller assemblies. It would only cost $150 at most of these places assuming that the wood of the tiller looks greyish and old, which you could cleanup anyway. What I'm getting at is that you may be able to find a boat salvage yard around Chicago/ Lake Michigan area.
          >
          > 4. As for the side note, I met a couple that sailed to Hawaii in a Coronado 25 about 10 years ago from Baja California area. So, 25 feet will do fine for Lake Michigan as far as I know. You probably have to worry more about giant jet boats and diesel powered #$&*%^s cutting you off and nearly hitting you, in which case the size of your boat is more about intimidation rather than safety.
          >
          > We all know my opinion on powerboats now, don't we?
          >
          > Hope that helps
          > Peter
          >
          >
          > --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "jpncommunications@" <jpncommunications@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I am now an owner of a 1968 fixed keel Coronado 25. I am looking to find out if she is worth trying to save or if I should scrap her out. She sat with about 2 feet of water in her this past winter. Combined with incorrect positioning of the hull on the trailer and the weight of the water, she now has indentations or what appears to be soft spots on both sides of the back of the boat where she rested on the rollers. My father in-law is a 30 year body man and expert in fiberglass work. On auto that is. I was given the boat for free so I have no cost yet . There are 2 sets of sails that appear to be in good shape with no rips or tears. All the interior is there and in ok shape I suppose and the engine is fine as well. The mast and boom also seem to be fine. There is no rudder or tiller. I am trying to find out what the cost factor is before going in to this. I have always wanted a sailboat but could never afford a good size one. Any help or input would be gratly appreciated. Thanks everyone. I am in Chicago. Just a side note, 25 ft should be big enough for Lake Michigan, No?
          > >
          >
        • bjwebb217
          The standing rigging is actually the shrouds and stays that run from the 4 points on the boat, up to the top of the mast. These are crucial, they have to be in
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 7, 2009
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            The standing rigging is actually the shrouds and stays that run from the 4 points on the boat, up to the top of the mast. These are crucial, they have to be in good shape, no rust or broken strands, or you could lose your whole rig, (mast, boom, etc) Also check the chainplates, large pieces of steel that the shrouds are attached to (port and starboard). Also if you have a wire halyard be sure to check your spreader bars, I just dropped my mast and found that mine have flat spots worn into them from the steel cable. The line you described, the lifeline or jackline, is important but more for your own safety than for the safety of the boat. On a sailboat I'd say your 3 most expensive things are, 1st your sails, cheapest I've seen a new set for is about 2500, 2nd is your outboard, and 3rd is your standing rigging/mast/boom. If all 3 of these are in good shape (along with a decent hull) then the rest of the boat is really cosmetic repairs. Interior work is tedious but not that hard.

            PS If you want to know how to drop the mast on a 25 without a crane, I rigged up a tripod that worked great, just finished using it today :) Send me an e-mail and I'll send you the specs on it.

            --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "jpncommunications@..." <jpncommunications@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hey Peter,
            >
            > Thanks for all the info. I will be heading out to my local Bookstore this weekend to get started on my grail quest for a watered down education. The wire/cable that lines the perimeter of the boat (standing rigging?)isnt rusted or have any broken strands, so thats a good thing. The engine is a 9.9 outboard so that makes repair easier I suppose. I do know that a couple of the stancions have some spider web cracks and there are cushions for the v berth only.
            >
            > As for the #$&*@^s power boats, I will be steering clear of any objects either mobile or stationary until I complete some sailing classes. Assuming I can get her sea worthy buy the end of summer. I appreciate all information and will be posting pictures as I get them and progress. Thanks again.
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "world_in_chaos" <peter.scranton@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hey,
            > >
            > > Well let's see if I can give my perspective of the answers to your questions.
            > >
            > > 1. If you've got an expert on fiberglass, regardless of the field, it can easily be adapted to boatwork and is a much better start than having zero experience. I would recommend buying a good sailboat DIY bible ~$40, and then laying up the fiberglass soft spots from the inside, with some kind of strong backing while you're at it. If you have to cut away part of the cabin with a jigsaw to reach an arm in there, so be it, just make sure you cut away the right part of the cabin interior, and not the hull or a place where you can't reach it from. This job is 90% labor, 10% cost, so since you got the boat for free, you're fine.
            > >
            > > 2. A lot of the stuff that you state "seem" to be fine will make or break whether you can fix her up for cheap. For instance, the engine. If the engine really is fine, you're set. But if it's not, the money will start flowing. However being in a big city like Chi you should be able to find someone to fix an A4 for cheap. (or was it an outboard, because that will be even easier to fix since you can remove it and bring it where your want)... The same goes with the mast, boom, and sails, and more specifically all the standing rigging, as that is where a fault would likely be with an old rig. If all of the wires are mostly free of rust, and there are no broken strands, then you are good to go. If you have a few broken strands here and there then I would heavily suggest replacing all the wires of the standing rigging, and that can be $300 or more, depending upon if you swage it yourself or have it all made for you.
            > >
            > > 3. The rudder and tiller are do-able, but probably on the more difficult end. There is a guy on this forum who is making his own rudder and I'm sure he can help you out. From my impression, you have to get the right size pipe for the length of the whole yoke and rudder and then weld on some support beams, layup fiberglass around it, coat it, and then weld/bolt on the yoke/tiller assembly on the top. Around the boat yards in Long beach and Los Angeles, this would be very easy for me because I have specifically seen either very similar rudders or the exact Coronado rudders, as well as 20-30 intact tiller assemblies. It would only cost $150 at most of these places assuming that the wood of the tiller looks greyish and old, which you could cleanup anyway. What I'm getting at is that you may be able to find a boat salvage yard around Chicago/ Lake Michigan area.
            > >
            > > 4. As for the side note, I met a couple that sailed to Hawaii in a Coronado 25 about 10 years ago from Baja California area. So, 25 feet will do fine for Lake Michigan as far as I know. You probably have to worry more about giant jet boats and diesel powered #$&*%^s cutting you off and nearly hitting you, in which case the size of your boat is more about intimidation rather than safety.
            > >
            > > We all know my opinion on powerboats now, don't we?
            > >
            > > Hope that helps
            > > Peter
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In Coronado25@yahoogroups.com, "jpncommunications@" <jpncommunications@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I am now an owner of a 1968 fixed keel Coronado 25. I am looking to find out if she is worth trying to save or if I should scrap her out. She sat with about 2 feet of water in her this past winter. Combined with incorrect positioning of the hull on the trailer and the weight of the water, she now has indentations or what appears to be soft spots on both sides of the back of the boat where she rested on the rollers. My father in-law is a 30 year body man and expert in fiberglass work. On auto that is. I was given the boat for free so I have no cost yet . There are 2 sets of sails that appear to be in good shape with no rips or tears. All the interior is there and in ok shape I suppose and the engine is fine as well. The mast and boom also seem to be fine. There is no rudder or tiller. I am trying to find out what the cost factor is before going in to this. I have always wanted a sailboat but could never afford a good size one. Any help or input would be gratly appreciated. Thanks everyone. I am in Chicago. Just a side note, 25 ft should be big enough for Lake Michigan, No?
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • xnjgarcia@yahoo.com
            bjwebb217 Can I get them specs on the attathment to lower the mast? Is that an A-gear right? I need to de-rig my boat next weekend, even thought I sail I have
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 13, 2009
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              bjwebb217

              Can I get them specs on the attathment to lower the mast? Is that an A-gear right? I need to de-rig my boat next weekend, even thought I sail I have never done it before, so if you kind enough to throw in some instructions and guidelines I will greatly appreciate it

              Thanks!
              Xavier
              Solomons's Island, MD

              Sent on the Now Network´┐Ż from my Sprint┬« BlackBerry


              From: "bjwebb217"
              Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 21:08:28 -0000
              To: <Coronado25@yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: [Coronado25] Re: New owner of Old Coronado 25... Should she have a DNR?

              The standing rigging is actually the shrouds and stays that run from the 4 points on the boat, up to the top of the mast. These are crucial, they have to be in good shape, no rust or broken strands, or you could lose your whole rig, (mast, boom, etc) Also check the chainplates, large pieces of steel that the shrouds are attached to (port and starboard). Also if you have a wire halyard be sure to check your spreader bars, I just dropped my mast and found that mine have flat spots worn into them from the steel cable. The line you described, the lifeline or jackline, is important but more for your own safety than for the safety of the boat. On a sailboat I'd say your 3 most expensive things are, 1st your sails, cheapest I've seen a new set for is about 2500, 2nd is your outboard, and 3rd is your standing rigging/mast/ boom. If all 3 of these are in good shape (along with a decent hull) then the rest of the boat is really cosmetic repairs. Interior work is tedious but not that hard.

              PS If you want to know how to drop the mast on a 25 without a crane, I rigged up a tripod that worked great, just finished using it today :) Send me an e-mail and I'll send you the specs on it.

              --- In Coronado25@yahoogro ups.com, "jpncommunications@ ..." <jpncommunications@ ...> wrote:
              >
              > Hey Peter,
              >
              > Thanks for all the info. I will be heading out to my local Bookstore this weekend to get started on my grail quest for a watered down education. The wire/cable that lines the perimeter of the boat (standing rigging?)isnt rusted or have any broken strands, so thats a good thing. The engine is a 9.9 outboard so that makes repair easier I suppose. I do know that a couple of the stancions have some spider web cracks and there are cushions for the v berth only.
              >
              > As for the #$&*@^s power boats, I will be steering clear of any objects either mobile or stationary until I complete some sailing classes. Assuming I can get her sea worthy buy the end of summer. I appreciate all information and will be posting pictures as I get them and progress. Thanks again.
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In Coronado25@yahoogro ups.com, "world_in_chaos" <peter.scranton@ > wrote:
              > >
              > > Hey,
              > >
              > > Well let's see if I can give my perspective of the answers to your questions.
              > >
              > > 1. If you've got an expert on fiberglass, regardless of the field, it can easily be adapted to boatwork and is a much better start than having zero experience. I would recommend buying a good sailboat DIY bible ~$40, and then laying up the fiberglass soft spots from the inside, with some kind of strong backing while you're at it. If you have to cut away part of the cabin with a jigsaw to reach an arm in there, so be it, just make sure you cut away the right part of the cabin interior, and not the hull or a place where you can't reach it from. This job is 90% labor, 10% cost, so since you got the boat for free, you're fine.
              > >
              > > 2. A lot of the stuff that you state "seem" to be fine will make or break whether you can fix her up for cheap. For instance, the engine. If the engine really is fine, you're set. But if it's not, the money will start flowing. However being in a big city like Chi you should be able to find someone to fix an A4 for cheap. (or was it an outboard, because that will be even easier to fix since you can remove it and bring it where your want)... The same goes with the mast, boom, and sails, and more specifically all the standing rigging, as that is where a fault would likely be with an old rig. If all of the wires are mostly free of rust, and there are no broken strands, then you are good to go. If you have a few broken strands here and there then I would heavily suggest replacing all the wires of the standing rigging, and that can be $300 or more, depending upon if you swage it yourself or have it all made for you.
              > >
              > > 3. The rudder and tiller are do-able, but probably on the more difficult end. There is a guy on this forum who is making his own rudder and I'm sure he can help you out. From my impression, you have to get the right size pipe for the length of the whole yoke and rudder and then weld on some support beams, layup fiberglass around it, coat it, and then weld/bolt on the yoke/tiller assembly on the top. Around the boat yards in Long beach and Los Angeles, this would be very easy for me because I have specifically seen either very similar rudders or the exact Coronado rudders, as well as 20-30 intact tiller assemblies. It would only cost $150 at most of these places assuming that the wood of the tiller looks greyish and old, which you could cleanup anyway. What I'm getting at is that you may be able to find a boat salvage yard around Chicago/ Lake Michigan area.
              > >
              > > 4. As for the side note, I met a couple that sailed to Hawaii in a Coronado 25 about 10 years ago from Baja California area. So, 25 feet will do fine for Lake Michigan as far as I know. You probably have to worry more about giant jet boats and diesel powered #$&*%^s cutting you off and nearly hitting you, in which case the size of your boat is more about intimidation rather than safety.
              > >
              > > We all know my opinion on powerboats now, don't we?
              > >
              > > Hope that helps
              > > Peter
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In Coronado25@yahoogro ups.com, "jpncommunications@ " <jpncommunications@ > wrote:
              > > >
              > > > I am now an owner of a 1968 fixed keel Coronado 25. I am looking to find out if she is worth trying to save or if I should scrap her out. She sat with about 2 feet of water in her this past winter. Combined with incorrect positioning of the hull on the trailer and the weight of the water, she now has indentations or what appears to be soft spots on both sides of the back of the boat where she rested on the rollers. My father in-law is a 30 year body man and expert in fiberglass work. On auto that is. I was given the boat for free so I have no cost yet . There are 2 sets of sails that appear to be in good shape with no rips or tears. All the interior is there and in ok shape I suppose and the engine is fine as well. The mast and boom also seem to be fine. There is no rudder or tiller. I am trying to find out what the cost factor is before going in to this. I have always wanted a sailboat but could never afford a good size one. Any help or input would be gratly appreciated. Thanks everyone. I am in Chicago. Just a side note, 25 ft should be big enough for Lake Michigan, No?
              > > >
              > >
              >

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