Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

How much corn in a Pickup Truck?

Expand Messages
  • Harry & Linda Clift
    Mary, Two long bed pickup truck full of corn will heat most very large homes in Tennessee a full season. $300 is the total farm amount for the season to load
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 14, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Mary, Two long bed pickup truck full of corn will heat most very
      large homes in Tennessee a full season. $300 is the total farm
      amount for the season to load the corn in bulk or bag. Return the
      bags and save $0.30/bag. Unlimited corn is delivered for $500 yr.

      All total that is 100 bushel bags of corn representing two trips to
      the local corn farm in a pickup truck or SUV. Small vehicles with
      small trunk space should plan trip three. Perhaps consider pulling a
      small utility trailer or be kind to a neighbor with a truck for a
      couple of hours. Outsmart XMart where deer and turkey corn cost
      twice that amount. Either event outsmarts other options. Coming
      soon will be a corn transfer method perhaps utilizing the existing
      vacuum cleaner. Everyone has a vacuum cleaner, correct?

      1.5 feet (1'6") deep, one ton of corn in a Ford F250 bed size,
      6.5'Lx4.0'Wx1'-6"D assuming the unobstructed no-fenderwell no spare
      tire size of the truck bed is 6.5feet long and 4.0 feet wide, one
      ton of loose whole kernel shelled corn would be one and one half
      feet deep.

      2.0 ft deep, 1.5 tons, the eight foot long bed pickup x 4 feet wide
      x 2.0 feet deep holds 1.5 tons corn.

      Two long bed pickup truck full of corn will heat most very large
      homes in Tennessee a full season. The farm will charge $300 and
      load the corn in bulk or bag. Return the bags and save $0.30/bag.
      All total that is 100 bushel bags of corn representing two trips to
      the local corn farm.

      41.5 cu ft holds one ton corn, 33.3 bushels, 2150 cu inches.

      If corn is in bags, the height may be 3' rather than 2' to allow for
      space between bags
      If you live in Iowa, Iowa, Mi, Pa in a breeze home, double the fuel
      but pay less for corn and likewise, double the savings in fuel cost.

      One absolute exceeds birth, death, taxes, and corn price.
      Corn miracle for 200 years in America stable price. Corn cost more
      in 1817 than in 2005. See http://webpages.charter.net/clift for
      bargraph of corn, gasoline, and bread since 1817.

      Harry and Linda



      --- In CornStoves@yahoogroups.com, "Hurd's Cornstoves"
      <restqnet@v...> wrote:
      > Question: How much dry shelled corn will fit in the back of my
      pick up truck (estimated). It is a Ford F250. It is the short bed so
      the length of the bed is 6-1/2 feet. Not sure on exact width and
      height at the time of this writing. I am going to load it with
      unbagged shelled corn, right out of the shoot and into my truck bed.
      AND will the weight be too much for a 3/4 ton truck?
      >
      > My guess is that you'd get about a ton in your truck.
      > Our 8' bed truck holds 1.5 tons bagged corn.
      > If your truck bed is not rusted and suspension good; you should
      have no problem.
      >
      > Whatever you do; don't do this:
      > My husband hoisted his previous truck on our previous car lift
      with 1 ton of bagged corn still in the back.
      > The truck fell off the lift; nearly killing him and basically bent
      the truck in half.
      > It was hell trying to get the truck off the lift and the truck was
      sold for parts at a loss of about $5000.
      > The lift pulled the 8" bolts out of the concrete floor; but was
      still in working order.
      > We sold the lift at a loss (of about $500), repaired the cement
      floor and ordered a new lift ($2600).
      > Unfortunately, the man with our new lift seems to have
      disappeared; after 6 anxious months of waiting.
      > After buying a new (used) truck for $6000; we are out about
      $14,000.
      > Not bad for a "know-it-all" husband, huh?
      >
      > Mary - NW Pennsylvania
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.