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Comet McNaught from Kingston, New York

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  • Tony Hoffman
    I saw Comet McNaught under quite unusual circumstances tonight. I had tried for it from the roof of an apartment building in Brooklyn, New York two nights ago,
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 8, 2007
      I saw Comet McNaught under quite unusual circumstances tonight. I had
      tried for it from the roof of an apartment building in Brooklyn, New
      York two nights ago, but clouds were a problem. They got worse
      yesterday, and it rained last night, with snow expected for tomorrow--
      it was rainy this morning, so I didn't hold out much hope of
      glimpsing the comet. My brother spent this morning in surgery, in
      Kingston, New York to have an aneurysm in his neck repaired. Shortly
      after noon, I got a call that he was out of surgery and it had gone
      well, so I drove over to the hospital. Almost as an afterthought, I
      brought my 7x50 binoculars (maybe I could sneak out after I saw him
      for a look, if I could find a place with a decent horizon); the sky
      was still murky, but there was a small patch of clearing. By the time
      I got to Kingston, there was a mix of sun and clouds. When I reached
      the hospital around 3 p.m., my brother was still undergoing tests,
      and I was told I could wait in the room that would soon be his. To my
      surprise his room faced the sunset, with a fairly unobstructed
      horizon, so I went down to the car and retrieved my binoculars, went
      back up and waited with my brother's best friend for his arrival. At
      around 4:30 they wheeled his bed in; he had come through the
      operation very well, better than expected. Starting at around 4:45 I
      started scanning the sunset sky; there was some cloud, but also a
      clear belt down to the horizon (though I couldn't see Venus). For a
      while a nurse took data for his chart, blocking my access to the
      window. When she finally moved, it was about 5:15. I saw Venus,
      partly immersed in some clouds, then was able to figure where the
      comet would be—in a zone where it was mostly cloud. Finally I picked
      up the comet through thin cloud, hanging just above a thicker
      cloudbank. It looked orange-white (likely due to its low altitude)
      and condensed, though fuzzy. I thought there was a hint of tail, but
      with the cloudiness around it, it was hard to tell. Just based on its
      appearance, I would have guessed that its magnitude was closer to 0
      than the -2 that I've been hearing, but with the clouds and lack of
      comparison stars it was impossible to make a real estimate. So I have
      two things to be thankful for tonight--my brother's successful
      operation, and my first (and perhaps only) glimpse of this major
      comet.

      --Tony
    • John Armstrong
      Tony, Blessings to your brother - glad to hear his surgery went exceedingly well! And congrats to you for spotting McNaught! Hoping I get a chance here in
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 8, 2007
        Tony,

        Blessings to your brother - glad to hear his surgery went exceedingly well! And congrats to you for spotting McNaught! Hoping I get a chance here in the morning. Directly west of us is Lake Michigan, so always during winter is low cloud banks. Maybe the east will provide a view in the AM. Cheers!

        Clear Skies and Calm Winds,
        John Armstrong
        Muskegon, MI
        ----------------------------
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Tony Hoffman<mailto:tonyhoffman@...>
        To: CometChasing@yahoogroups.com<mailto:CometChasing@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, January 08, 2007 11:21 PM
        Subject: [CometChasing] Comet McNaught from Kingston, New York


        I saw Comet McNaught under quite unusual circumstances tonight. I had
        tried for it from the roof of an apartment building in Brooklyn, New
        York two nights ago, but clouds were a problem. They got worse
        yesterday, and it rained last night, with snow expected for tomorrow--
        it was rainy this morning, so I didn't hold out much hope of
        glimpsing the comet. My brother spent this morning in surgery, in
        Kingston, New York to have an aneurysm in his neck repaired. Shortly
        after noon, I got a call that he was out of surgery and it had gone
        well, so I drove over to the hospital. Almost as an afterthought, I
        brought my 7x50 binoculars (maybe I could sneak out after I saw him
        for a look, if I could find a place with a decent horizon); the sky
        was still murky, but there was a small patch of clearing. By the time
        I got to Kingston, there was a mix of sun and clouds. When I reached
        the hospital around 3 p.m., my brother was still undergoing tests,
        and I was told I could wait in the room that would soon be his. To my
        surprise his room faced the sunset, with a fairly unobstructed
        horizon, so I went down to the car and retrieved my binoculars, went
        back up and waited with my brother's best friend for his arrival. At
        around 4:30 they wheeled his bed in; he had come through the
        operation very well, better than expected. Starting at around 4:45 I
        started scanning the sunset sky; there was some cloud, but also a
        clear belt down to the horizon (though I couldn't see Venus). For a
        while a nurse took data for his chart, blocking my access to the
        window. When she finally moved, it was about 5:15. I saw Venus,
        partly immersed in some clouds, then was able to figure where the
        comet would be-in a zone where it was mostly cloud. Finally I picked
        up the comet through thin cloud, hanging just above a thicker
        cloudbank. It looked orange-white (likely due to its low altitude)
        and condensed, though fuzzy. I thought there was a hint of tail, but
        with the cloudiness around it, it was hard to tell. Just based on its
        appearance, I would have guessed that its magnitude was closer to 0
        than the -2 that I've been hearing, but with the clouds and lack of
        comparison stars it was impossible to make a real estimate. So I have
        two things to be thankful for tonight--my brother's successful
        operation, and my first (and perhaps only) glimpse of this major
        comet.

        --Tony

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ellen Papenburg
        (Tony: That was a great story! Hope all is well with your brother!) From Drayton, Ontario 43N (and some) Well, I was up this morning with great hopes to see
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 9, 2007
          (Tony: That was a great story! Hope all is well with your brother!)

          From Drayton, Ontario 43N (and some)

          Well, I was up this morning with great hopes to see the comet, as it had
          been clear through the night (don't ask why I know).. but at 7 this
          morning, rushing to the car (covered with snow finally), I was greatly
          disappointed seeing the moon peeking through a nice layer of clouds. So
          that ... was that....

          Cry!

          Hope others will have some more luck!

          Ellen - only early up for comets, otherwise not a morning person, and
          now sipping my coffee.
        • Forest Markowitz
          Hello - back in New York City and yes - caught a fuzzy glimpse at about 5:19pm from my roof top in Manhattan thru 10X50 s - just an orange tinged blob (no
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 9, 2007
            Hello - back in New York City and yes - caught a fuzzy glimpse at about 5:19pm from my roof top in Manhattan thru 10X50's - just an orange tinged blob (no tail) and just discernable - I have a great southwest view and after a day of heavy rain it cleared out about 4pm - visibilty for Manhattan was outstanding, the wind was strong from the northwest and horizon was clear. Wasn't much to see but afterall is was from Manhattan. Venus was spectacular - guess we'll have so UFO reports soon.

            Tony Hoffman <tonyhoffman@...> wrote: I saw Comet McNaught under quite unusual circumstances tonight. I had
            tried for it from the roof of an apartment building in Brooklyn, New
            York two nights ago, but clouds were a problem. They got worse
            yesterday, and it rained last night, with snow expected for tomorrow--
            it was rainy this morning, so I didn't hold out much hope of
            glimpsing the comet. My brother spent this morning in surgery, in
            Kingston, New York to have an aneurysm in his neck repaired. Shortly
            after noon, I got a call that he was out of surgery and it had gone
            well, so I drove over to the hospital. Almost as an afterthought, I
            brought my 7x50 binoculars (maybe I could sneak out after I saw him
            for a look, if I could find a place with a decent horizon); the sky
            was still murky, but there was a small patch of clearing. By the time
            I got to Kingston, there was a mix of sun and clouds. When I reached
            the hospital around 3 p.m., my brother was still undergoing tests,
            and I was told I could wait in the room that would soon be his. To my
            surprise his room faced the sunset, with a fairly unobstructed
            horizon, so I went down to the car and retrieved my binoculars, went
            back up and waited with my brother's best friend for his arrival. At
            around 4:30 they wheeled his bed in; he had come through the
            operation very well, better than expected. Starting at around 4:45 I
            started scanning the sunset sky; there was some cloud, but also a
            clear belt down to the horizon (though I couldn't see Venus). For a
            while a nurse took data for his chart, blocking my access to the
            window. When she finally moved, it was about 5:15. I saw Venus,
            partly immersed in some clouds, then was able to figure where the
            comet would be—in a zone where it was mostly cloud. Finally I picked
            up the comet through thin cloud, hanging just above a thicker
            cloudbank. It looked orange-white (likely due to its low altitude)
            and condensed, though fuzzy. I thought there was a hint of tail, but
            with the cloudiness around it, it was hard to tell. Just based on its
            appearance, I would have guessed that its magnitude was closer to 0
            than the -2 that I've been hearing, but with the clouds and lack of
            comparison stars it was impossible to make a real estimate. So I have
            two things to be thankful for tonight--my brother's successful
            operation, and my first (and perhaps only) glimpse of this major
            comet.

            --Tony






            Forest Markowitz
            New York USA
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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Tony Hoffman
            Congrats on finding McNaught from Manhattan, Forest. John and Ellen, thanks for your kind words. My brother is doing great, and was released from the hospital
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 9, 2007
              Congrats on finding McNaught from Manhattan, Forest. John and Ellen,
              thanks for your kind words. My brother is doing great, and was
              released from the hospital today.

              Tonight I was able to catch Comet McNaught again, this time from an
              elevated train platform near my home in Queens, New York, in 20x80
              binoculars, through thin clouds. I wasn't able to make a magnitude
              estimate, but although Venus, in a similar cloud layer, was easy
              naked-eye, I was unable to see the comet at all with the naked eye.
              In binoculars, the comet looked orangeish, and about 0.4 degrees of
              tail were visible. The paraboloid shape of the coma going into the
              tail was striking and beautiful. A splendid twilight comet.

              --Tony


              --- In CometChasing@yahoogroups.com, Forest Markowitz
              <hampton_west@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello - back in New York City and yes - caught a fuzzy glimpse at
              about 5:19pm from my roof top in Manhattan thru 10X50's - just an
              orange tinged blob (no tail) and just discernable - I have a great
              southwest view and after a day of heavy rain it cleared out about
              4pm - visibilty for Manhattan was outstanding, the wind was strong
              from the northwest and horizon was clear. Wasn't much to see but
              afterall is was from Manhattan. Venus was spectacular - guess we'll
              have so UFO reports soon.
              >
              >
              > Forest Markowitz
              > New York USA
            • Forest Markowitz
              Yony, Guess Queens has better skys - I tried from my rooftop again - shutout - oh well Congrats on finding McNaught from Manhattan, Forest. John and Ellen,
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 10, 2007
                Yony,

                Guess Queens has better skys - I tried from my rooftop again - shutout - oh well


                Congrats on finding McNaught from Manhattan, Forest. John and Ellen,
                thanks for your kind words. My brother is doing great, and was
                released from the hospital today.

                Tonight I was able to catch Comet McNaught again, this time from an
                elevated train platform near my home in Queens, New York, in 20x80
                binoculars, through thin clouds. I wasn't able to make a magnitude
                estimate, but although Venus, in a similar cloud layer, was easy
                naked-eye, I was unable to see the comet at all with the naked eye.
                In binoculars, the comet looked orangeish, and about 0.4 degrees of
                tail were visible. The paraboloid shape of the coma going into the
                tail was striking and beautiful. A splendid twilight comet.

                --Tony

                --- In CometChasing@yahoogroups.com, Forest Markowitz
                <hampton_west@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hello - back in New York City and yes - caught a fuzzy glimpse at
                about 5:19pm from my roof top in Manhattan thru 10X50's - just an
                orange tinged blob (no tail) and just discernable - I have a great
                southwest view and after a day of heavy rain it cleared out about
                4pm - visibilty for Manhattan was outstanding, the wind was strong
                from the northwest and horizon was clear. Wasn't much to see but
                afterall is was from Manhattan. Venus was spectacular - guess we'll
                have so UFO reports soon.
                >
                >
                > Forest Markowitz
                > New York USA






                Forest Markowitz
                New York USA

                ---------------------------------
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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Forest Markowitz
                believe it or not - I m flying to Paris tonight from Kennedy - plane leaves at 4:30 pm you can bet I ll take a window seat on the correct side and do my
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 10, 2007
                  believe it or not - I'm flying to Paris tonight from Kennedy - plane leaves at 4:30 pm you can bet I'll take a window seat on the correct side and do my damnest to get a glimpse!

                  Tony Hoffman <tonyhoffman@...> wrote: Congrats on finding McNaught from Manhattan, Forest. John and Ellen,
                  thanks for your kind words. My brother is doing great, and was
                  released from the hospital today.

                  Tonight I was able to catch Comet McNaught again, this time from an
                  elevated train platform near my home in Queens, New York, in 20x80
                  binoculars, through thin clouds. I wasn't able to make a magnitude
                  estimate, but although Venus, in a similar cloud layer, was easy
                  naked-eye, I was unable to see the comet at all with the naked eye.
                  In binoculars, the comet looked orangeish, and about 0.4 degrees of
                  tail were visible. The paraboloid shape of the coma going into the
                  tail was striking and beautiful. A splendid twilight comet.

                  --Tony

                  --- In CometChasing@yahoogroups.com, Forest Markowitz
                  <hampton_west@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello - back in New York City and yes - caught a fuzzy glimpse at
                  about 5:19pm from my roof top in Manhattan thru 10X50's - just an
                  orange tinged blob (no tail) and just discernable - I have a great
                  southwest view and after a day of heavy rain it cleared out about
                  4pm - visibilty for Manhattan was outstanding, the wind was strong
                  from the northwest and horizon was clear. Wasn't much to see but
                  afterall is was from Manhattan. Venus was spectacular - guess we'll
                  have so UFO reports soon.
                  >
                  >
                  > Forest Markowitz
                  > New York USA






                  Forest Markowitz
                  New York USA

                  ---------------------------------
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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Forest Markowitz
                  back from France; Jan 10th took off from Kennedy International at 4:47pm. Sky was clear. Unfortunately my seat was on the East side of the plane. As I boarded
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 15, 2007
                    back from France;
                    Jan 10th took off from Kennedy International at 4:47pm. Sky was clear. Unfortunately my seat was on the East side of the plane. As I boarded the pilot was greeting passengers and I told him about the comet - he knew about it and had seen it a few days previous - he also told me the plane would loop about 5:15 or so (depending on actual takeoff) and I'd have my chance to observe. Sure enough after a Northwest takeoff the plane looped to head east over the Atlantic and there it was - in clear view from 30,000 feet - with a brilliant Venus nearby - what a sight! Though slightly orange from twilight the tail was a light bluish color extending northwest; hard to give dimensions and magnitude but it was a sight I'll never forget.
                    I had my loop for about 2 minutes and then I managed to switch seats with someone and observed for about 5 more minutes. Amazing!

                    Forest Markowitz <hampton_west@...> wrote:
                    believe it or not - I'm flying to Paris tonight from Kennedy - plane leaves at 4:30 pm you can bet I'll take a window seat on the correct side and do my damnest to get a glimpse!

                    Tony Hoffman <tonyhoffman@...> wrote: Congrats on finding McNaught from Manhattan, Forest. John and Ellen,
                    thanks for your kind words. My brother is doing great, and was
                    released from the hospital today.

                    Tonight I was able to catch Comet McNaught again, this time from an
                    elevated train platform near my home in Queens, New York, in 20x80
                    binoculars, through thin clouds. I wasn't able to make a magnitude
                    estimate, but although Venus, in a similar cloud layer, was easy
                    naked-eye, I was unable to see the comet at all with the naked eye.
                    In binoculars, the comet looked orangeish, and about 0.4 degrees of
                    tail were visible. The paraboloid shape of the coma going into the
                    tail was striking and beautiful. A splendid twilight comet.

                    --Tony

                    --- In CometChasing@yahoogroups.com, Forest Markowitz
                    <hampton_west@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello - back in New York City and yes - caught a fuzzy glimpse at
                    about 5:19pm from my roof top in Manhattan thru 10X50's - just an
                    orange tinged blob (no tail) and just discernable - I have a great
                    southwest view and after a day of heavy rain it cleared out about
                    4pm - visibilty for Manhattan was outstanding, the wind was strong
                    from the northwest and horizon was clear. Wasn't much to see but
                    afterall is was from Manhattan. Venus was spectacular - guess we'll
                    have so UFO reports soon.
                    >
                    >
                    > Forest Markowitz
                    > New York USA

                    Forest Markowitz
                    New York USA

                    ---------------------------------
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                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                    Forest Markowitz
                    New York USA

                    ---------------------------------
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                  • Tony Hoffman
                    Great-- Congratulations, Forest! Tony ... clear. Unfortunately my seat was on the East side of the plane. As I boarded the pilot was greeting passengers and I
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 16, 2007
                      Great--
                      Congratulations, Forest!
                      Tony

                      --- In CometChasing@yahoogroups.com, Forest Markowitz
                      <hampton_west@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > back from France;
                      > Jan 10th took off from Kennedy International at 4:47pm. Sky was
                      clear. Unfortunately my seat was on the East side of the plane. As I
                      boarded the pilot was greeting passengers and I told him about the
                      comet - he knew about it and had seen it a few days previous - he
                      also told me the plane would loop about 5:15 or so (depending on
                      actual takeoff) and I'd have my chance to observe. Sure enough after
                      a Northwest takeoff the plane looped to head east over the Atlantic
                      and there it was - in clear view from 30,000 feet - with a brilliant
                      Venus nearby - what a sight! Though slightly orange from twilight the
                      tail was a light bluish color extending northwest; hard to give
                      dimensions and magnitude but it was a sight I'll never forget.
                      > I had my loop for about 2 minutes and then I managed to switch
                      seats with someone and observed for about 5 more minutes. Amazing!
                      >
                      > Forest Markowitz <hampton_west@...> wrote:
                      > believe it or not - I'm flying to Paris tonight from
                      Kennedy - plane leaves at 4:30 pm you can bet I'll take a window seat
                      on the correct side and do my damnest to get a glimpse!
                      >
                      >
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