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Re: [CombatAircraft] They came to thier senses ?

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  • Benscan@aol.com
    Hi MC! You ve got an interesting point! I heard the same thing and specifically the item that has brought the Apaches low is an old nemesis... The RPG-7. This
    Message 1 of 67 , Mar 1, 2004
      Hi MC!
      You've got an interesting point! I heard the same thing and specifically the item that has brought the Apaches low is an old nemesis... The RPG-7. This little mutha has a switch on the side of the rocket-propelled grenade so that the firer can switch it from contact detonation to proximity which makes it a rather formidable anti-aircraft weapon especially against the slower-flying helicoptors.

      And I got the word direction from a technician at the Naval Air Warefare Center at Patuxent River Maryland.. The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is the supposed replacement for the A-10... not likely, I think.

      Happy Landings!
      Ben


      In a message dated 2/27/04 7:13:58 AM Eastern Standard Time, max_g_cunningham@... writes:


      I suspect one factor might be,  that in the latest Iraqu
      war,  I heard accounts of US Appaches being mauled
      quite severely in ambush,  by Iraqu's Repulican Guard
      infantry units,  sporting heavy automatic weaponry.

      Now the USAF wants to replace the A10 with the VTOL JSF,
      wich I also regard as a mistake.
      MC



    • Brooks Rowlett
      ... Soviet SAM systems usually but not always, are organized such that there are one or more air search set for a group of SAM sites (if fixed) or units (if
      Message 67 of 67 , Mar 31, 2004
        On Mar 31, 2004, at 12:00 AM, Parazo Jerico wrote:

        > I forgot. I got the info from a Serbian webpage so it
        > might not be reliable, though I got from a webpage on
        > aircraft that steath aircraft could be found using LF
        > radar. Don't they use one radar set for each SAM
        > model?


        Soviet SAM systems usually but not always, are organized such that
        there are one or more air search set for a group of SAM sites (if
        fixed) or units (if mobile). The air search radars are generally in
        the HF- UHF-old P band frequencies (which is better for range anyway,
        because the lower RFs suffer less loss from atmospheric attenuation and
        weather). Then there is generally a local acquisition radar for the
        actual site or SAM battery/unit; finally there are one or more fire
        control radars associated with the site. In recent years the fire
        control radar has often been supplemented by an electro-optic tracking
        system. The key point here is that the low frequency radar which spots
        the aircraft has nothing to do with the fire control system.

        - Brooks A. Rowlett
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