Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

A question on Coaxial Rotors

Expand Messages
  • Parazo Jerico
    One of the cited problems of the V-22 is that it has a high disc loading due to the short rotor blades, requiring the prop rotors to spin at higher speeds than
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      One of the cited problems of the V-22 is that it has a high disc loading due to the short rotor blades, requiring the prop rotors to spin at higher speeds than almost all other choppers.  I wonder if going coaxial with the V-22 for both engine pods might reduce disc loading and rpm.  This arrangement is used in the Tu-95, which is one of the fastest, if not the fastest, propeller plane.  Imagine the arrangement used on the choppers in the movie, "Avatar".


      Will this also reduce VRS?

    • max c
      To a degree, it s all been done before, with medicore results, due to inherent difficulties with the concepts, and to some extent limitations of the
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        To a degree, it's all been done before, with medicore results, due to
        inherent difficulties
        with the concepts, and to some extent limitations of the technology of
        the day.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_XV-5_Vertifan

        http://vstol.org/

        M



        --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, Parazo Jerico <jericoparazo@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > One of the cited problems of the V-22 is that it has a high disc
        loading due to the short rotor blades, requiring the prop rotors to spin
        at higher speeds than almost all other choppers. I wonder if going
        coaxial with the V-22 for both engine pods might reduce disc loading and
        rpm. This arrangement is used in the Tu-95, which is one of the
        fastest, if not the fastest, propeller plane. Imagine the arrangement
        used on the choppers in the movie, "Avatar".
        >
        >
        > Will this also reduce VRS?
        >
      • max c
        The only question maybe, who s more stupid ! ? Those that build it, laughing all the way to the bank ? Those who pay for it, while our roads and bridges
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 1, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          The only question maybe,  who's more stupid ! ?
          Those that build it,  laughing all the way to the bank ?
          Those who pay for it,  while our roads and bridges crumble ?
          Or those who try to fly it ?
          M

          http://tinyurl.com/3yfxb95

          [Open in new window]

          http://media.defenseindustrydaily.com/images/AIR_MV-22_Downwash_Dust_Cloud_lg.jpg
          http://tinyurl.com/34an4ma
          [Open in new window]


          http://tinyurl.com/345w79g
          [Open in new window]





          --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, Parazo Jerico <jericoparazo@...> wrote:
          >
          > One of the cited problems of the V-22 is that it has a high disc loading due to the short rotor blades, requiring the prop rotors to spin at higher speeds than almost all other choppers.  I wonder if going coaxial with the V-22 for both engine pods might reduce disc loading and rpm.  This arrangement is used in the Tu-95, which is one of the fastest, if not the fastest, propeller plane.  Imagine the arrangement used on the choppers in the movie, "Avatar".
          >
          >
          > Will this also reduce VRS?
          >
        • max c
          ... deployment ... In theory. From what I gather in practice, they dare not take into an intense threat enviroment. It has so many quirks, and is so
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 1, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, Chris Fowler <sflraptor@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I agree. The V-22 is designed to solve the inherent tactical
            deployment
            > problems associated with helicopters.


            In theory.
            From what I gather in practice, they dare not take into an intense
            threat enviroment.
            It has so many quirks, and is so intensely vunerable to ground fire.

            It's being used essentially in a very timid way, basically in the role
            of
            the C-47 transport, of mid & post WW-2 fame.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C-47_Skytrain

            Trust the US defence establishment, to take a $ 100 million dollar
            machine, with hideously complex, expensive, and intense maintenance
            requirements, to replace a simple afforable, proven, and easily
            maintained
            platform like the C-41.

            More evidence this protracted mis-adventure in Afganistan is little
            more than an employment money making exersize and
            for beta testing weapons and methodolgies.

            M
          • max c
            Then, you ll hear the thing coming, from 10 kilometers away, and can be ready for it. M
            Message 5 of 17 , Jul 1, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Then, you'll hear the thing coming, from
              10 kilometers away, and can be ready for it.

              M

              --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, Parazo Jerico <jericoparazo@...> wrote:
              >
              > One of the cited problems of the V-22 is that it has a high disc loading due to the short rotor blades, requiring the prop rotors to spin at higher speeds than almost all other choppers.  I wonder if going coaxial with the V-22 for both engine pods might reduce disc loading and rpm.  This arrangement is used in the Tu-95, which is one of the fastest, if not the fastest, propeller plane.  Imagine the arrangement used on the choppers in the movie, "Avatar".
              >
              >
              > Will this also reduce VRS?
              >
            • Parazo Jerico
              Ahh....I get your point.  The Tu-95 can actually be tracked on SOSUS.   Of course, you could eschew the Tu-95 s engines and just fit rotors that can turn
              Message 6 of 17 , Jul 1, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Ahh....I get your point.  The Tu-95 can actually be tracked on SOSUS.   Of course, you could eschew the Tu-95's engines and just fit rotors that can turn slower.   Maybe they can add rotor blades.

                --- On Thu, 7/1/10, max c <max_g_cunningham@...> wrote:

                From: max c <max_g_cunningham@...>
                Subject: [CombatAircraft] A question on Coaxial Rotors
                To: CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, July 1, 2010, 11:33 PM

                 

                Then, you'll hear the thing coming, from
                10 kilometers away, and can be ready for it.

                M

                --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, Parazo Jerico <jericoparazo@...> wrote:
                >
                > One of the cited problems of the V-22 is that it has a high disc loading due to the short rotor blades, requiring the prop rotors to spin at higher speeds than almost all other choppers.  I wonder if going coaxial with the V-22 for both engine pods might reduce disc loading and rpm.  This arrangement is used in the Tu-95, which is one of the fastest, if not the fastest, propeller plane.  Imagine the arrangement used on the choppers in the movie, "Avatar".
                >
                >
                > Will this also reduce VRS?
                >


              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.