Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: QUESTION MARKS MULTIPLY AFTER RUSSIAN PLANE CRASH IN LITHUANIA

Expand Messages
  • MGC
    Hello Justin, Very interesting story. It comes across as somewhat of a bizzare episode, and the writer seems to put forth a bit of an agenda. On the one hand
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 2, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Justin,

      Very interesting story. It comes across as somewhat of a bizzare
      episode, and the writer seems to put forth a bit of an agenda.

      On the one hand he's daming the of the East German AFP's and
      equipment, and on the other, the Russians themselves, lost a very
      valuable aircraft, for no apparent reason, that was apparently way
      of course (lost) in the first place,,.

      What's your take on this ?

      I once met a German Phantom crew at Nigara Falls AFB NYS,
      before the wall came down, so these guys were West German.
      I impression was that of absolutely first class flyers, in every
      respect, with older equipment, but never the less immaculately
      maintained, and entirely upto the task.
      MC

      --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, "Justin" <jjmessenger@y...>
      wrote:
      > QUESTION MARKS MULTIPLY AFTER RUSSIAN PLANE CRASH IN LITHUANIA
      >
      > By Vladimir Socor
      >
      > Tuesday, September 27, 2005
      >
      > The incident has demonstrated that NATO's air policing operation
      > for
      > the Baltic states needs to be upgraded. NATO radars and planes --
      > four German F-4 Phantom jets in the current rotation, based at
      > Zokniai in Lithuania -- were slow to detect and failed to intercept
      > the intruding plane. Russia's Air Force Commander-in-Chief, General
      > Vladimir Mikhailov, reacted with glee: "Air defense forces and
      > assets in Lithuania simply turned out to be good for nothing. The
      > vaunted NATO German pilots were on duty that day. Were they
      drinking
      > beer, I wonder? For more than 20 minutes this big aircraft was
      > flying over the territory of Lithuania, but it was spotted only
      when
      > it crashed," Mikhailov told a news conference at air force
      > headquarters in Torzhok (RIA-Novosti, Interfax, September 26).
      >
    • Justin
      Even an F-15s sitting on the ground would need good vectors to find their target in a scramble like this. It does sound like the NATO early warning system was
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 14, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Even an F-15s sitting on the ground would need good vectors to find
        their target in a scramble like this. It does sound like the NATO
        early warning system was not up to the task.

        The F-4F today is much improved over the late 80's F-4, with new
        radar and AMRAAM.

        My impression of the German F-4 crews that I met last year was the
        same as yours.

        Follow up reports reveal that the Russian planes were flying in a
        long line with several minutes of separation betweent the fighters.
        When the fighter got lost the rest of the planes had already
        returned to base. It appears Russian Air Force maintenance is in bad
        shape.
        Justin

        --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, "MGC" <max_g_cunningham@y...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hello Justin,
        >
        > Very interesting story. It comes across as somewhat of a bizzare
        > episode, and the writer seems to put forth a bit of an agenda.
        >
        > On the one hand he's daming the of the East German AFP's and
        > equipment, and on the other, the Russians themselves, lost a
        very
        > valuable aircraft, for no apparent reason, that was apparently
        way
        > of course (lost) in the first place,,.
        >
        > What's your take on this ?
        >
        > I once met a German Phantom crew at Nigara Falls AFB NYS,
        > before the wall came down, so these guys were West German.
        > I impression was that of absolutely first class flyers, in every
        > respect, with older equipment, but never the less immaculately
        > maintained, and entirely upto the task.
        > MC
        >
        > --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, "Justin" <jjmessenger@y...>
        > wrote:
        > > QUESTION MARKS MULTIPLY AFTER RUSSIAN PLANE CRASH IN LITHUANIA
        > >
        > > By Vladimir Socor
        > >
        > > Tuesday, September 27, 2005
        > >
        > > The incident has demonstrated that NATO's air policing operation
        > > for
        > > the Baltic states needs to be upgraded. NATO radars and planes --

        > > four German F-4 Phantom jets in the current rotation, based at
        > > Zokniai in Lithuania -- were slow to detect and failed to
        intercept
        > > the intruding plane. Russia's Air Force Commander-in-Chief,
        General
        > > Vladimir Mikhailov, reacted with glee: "Air defense forces and
        > > assets in Lithuania simply turned out to be good for nothing.
        The
        > > vaunted NATO German pilots were on duty that day. Were they
        > drinking
        > > beer, I wonder? For more than 20 minutes this big aircraft was
        > > flying over the territory of Lithuania, but it was spotted only
        > when
        > > it crashed," Mikhailov told a news conference at air force
        > > headquarters in Torzhok (RIA-Novosti, Interfax, September 26).
        > >
        >
      • MGC
        The whole story is redicoulous, The Russians arn t much of a credible threat to NATO these days, to the dispair of F-22 advocates, they seem to have thier
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 15, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          The whole story is redicoulous,

          The "Russians" arn't much of a credible threat to NATO these days,
          to the dispair of F-22 advocates, they seem to have thier hands full
          dealing with Chetchnia.
          M










          --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, "Justin" <jjmessenger@y...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Even an F-15s sitting on the ground would need good vectors to find
          > their target in a scramble like this. It does sound like the NATO
          > early warning system was not up to the task.
          >
          > The F-4F today is much improved over the late 80's F-4, with new
          > radar and AMRAAM.
          >
          > My impression of the German F-4 crews that I met last year was the
          > same as yours.
          >
          > Follow up reports reveal that the Russian planes were flying in a
          > long line with several minutes of separation betweent the fighters.
          > When the fighter got lost the rest of the planes had already
          > returned to base. It appears Russian Air Force maintenance is in
          bad
          > shape.
          > Justin
          >
          > --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, "MGC"
          <max_g_cunningham@y...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Hello Justin,
          > >
          > > Very interesting story. It comes across as somewhat of a bizzare
          > > episode, and the writer seems to put forth a bit of an agenda.
          > >
          > > On the one hand he's daming the of the East German AFP's and
          > > equipment, and on the other, the Russians themselves, lost a
          > very
          > > valuable aircraft, for no apparent reason, that was apparently
          > way
          > > of course (lost) in the first place,,.
          > >
          > > What's your take on this ?
          > >
          > > I once met a German Phantom crew at Nigara Falls AFB NYS,
          > > before the wall came down, so these guys were West German.
          > > I impression was that of absolutely first class flyers, in every
          > > respect, with older equipment, but never the less immaculately
          > > maintained, and entirely upto the task.
          > > MC
          > >
          > > --- In CombatAircraft@yahoogroups.com, "Justin"
          <jjmessenger@y...>
          > > wrote:
          > > > QUESTION MARKS MULTIPLY AFTER RUSSIAN PLANE CRASH IN LITHUANIA
          > > >
          > > > By Vladimir Socor
          > > >
          > > > Tuesday, September 27, 2005
          > > >
          > > > The incident has demonstrated that NATO's air policing
          operation
          > > > for
          > > > the Baltic states needs to be upgraded. NATO radars and planes -
          -
          >
          > > > four German F-4 Phantom jets in the current rotation, based at
          > > > Zokniai in Lithuania -- were slow to detect and failed to
          > intercept
          > > > the intruding plane. Russia's Air Force Commander-in-Chief,
          > General
          > > > Vladimir Mikhailov, reacted with glee: "Air defense forces and
          > > > assets in Lithuania simply turned out to be good for nothing.
          > The
          > > > vaunted NATO German pilots were on duty that day. Were they
          > > drinking
          > > > beer, I wonder? For more than 20 minutes this big aircraft was
          > > > flying over the territory of Lithuania, but it was spotted only
          > > when
          > > > it crashed," Mikhailov told a news conference at air force
          > > > headquarters in Torzhok (RIA-Novosti, Interfax, September 26).
          > > >
          > >
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.